USS Cincinnati CL-6 - History

USS Cincinnati CL-6 - History

USS Cincinnati CL-6

Cincinnati III
(CL-6: dp. 7,050; 1. 555'6"; b. 55'4"; dr. 13'6"; s. 34 k.
cpl. 468; a. 12 6", 4 3", 10 21" tt.; cl. Omaha)

The third Cincinnati was launched 23 May 1921 by Seattle Construction Drydock Co., Seattle, Wash., sponsored by Mrs. C. E. Tudor; completed by Todd Dry Dock and Construction Co., Tacoma, Wash.; and commissioned 1 January 1924, Captain C. P. Nelson in command.

After a shakedown cruise off South America, Cincinnati joined the Scouting Fleet in June 1924, for operations along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. With this force, she joined in fleet maneuvers in the Pacific and off the Panama Canal Zone in spring 1925, then resumed Atlantic and Caribbean operations until early in 1927.

On 17 February 1927, Cincinnati sailed from Balboa, C.Z., for duty in the Far East, based at Shanghai until October, then at Manila, and again at Shanghai from February 1928 to April. On the long cruise home to the east coast, she joined in exercises off Oahu and, carried men from Honolulu to Corinto, Nicaragua, returning to Newport, R.I., 25 July 1928, for operations on the east coast until 1932.

Early in 1932, she joined the Battle Force, U.S. Fleet, in the Pacific, taking part in the Fleet's cruise to the east coast between April and July 1934 for the Presidential Review of 31 May at New York. Returning to the west coast, she operated on summer training cruises for naval reservists from 1935 to 1938, then was reassigned to Atlantic duty during 1939.

Cincinnati was based at Pearl Harbor from April 1940, voyaging to Guam and the Philippines on transport duty at the close of that year. In March 1941, she returned to the Atlantic, and joined in the ever-expanding patrol operations in the western Atlantic. Upon the outbreak of war, she continued patrols and convoy escort assignments in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, blockading French men-of-war at Martinique, and searching for German blockade runners. With Milwaukee (CL-5) and Somers (DD-381), Cincinnati discovered one of these, SS Annaliese Essberger, on 21 November 1942. The German crew scuttled their ship but a boarding party reached the ship in time to discover its identity and take all 62 crew members prisoners before the blockade runner sank.

Overhauled at New York early in 1944, Cincinnati served as escort flagship for the crossing of three convoys from New York to Belfast between March and July 1944, guarding the passage of men and equipment essential to the invasion of Europe. On 28 July, she sailed from Norfolk to patrol the Western Mediterranean during the time of the assault on Southern France, and returned to New York 9 September. After overhaul, she joined the 4th Fleet at Recife, Brazil, 17 November, and patrolled South Atlantic shipping lanes until the close of the European phase of the war.

In the summer of 1945, Cincinnati carried midshipmen on two training cruises, and on 29 September arrived at Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned 1 November 1945 and scrapped 27 February 1946.

Cincinnati received one battle star for World War II service.


  • Construction and design
  • Armament changes
  • Service history
  • Inter-war period
  • World War II
  • Notable commanders
  • Awards
  • References
  • Bibliography
  • Further reading
  • External links

Cincinnati split her pre-war career between the Atlantic and the Pacific fleets. She served in the Scouting Fleet, based in the Atlantic, in 1924 to 1927, serving in the Pacific for a brief time in 1925 for fleet maneuvers. Cincinnati joined the Asiatic Fleet in 1927, and returned to the Atlantic from 1928 to 1932. She continued to go back and forth between oceans until March 1941, when she was assigned to Neutrality Patrol in the western Atlantic.

When the United States entered World War II she was assigned to TF41, based at Recife, and used on convoy escort duties and patrols in the south Atlantic. In 1944, she sailed for the Mediterranean to support Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the south of France. After the war, she was deemed surplus and scrapped at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in February 1946.


Contents

Cincinnati was ordered on 29 August 1916 [2] and contracted to be built by Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co., Tacoma, Washington, [3] 27 August 1917. Her keel was laid on 15 May 1920 and launched on 23 May 1921, [2] the cruiser was christened by Mrs. Charles E. Tudor, wife of the Director of Safety of Cincinnati, Ohio, having been designated by the Honorable John Galvin, Mayor of Cincinnati and commissioned 1 January 1924, Captain Charles P. Nelson in command. [4]

Cincinnati was 550 feet (170 metres) long at the waterline with an overall length of 555 feet 6 inches (169.32 metres), her beam was 55 feet 4 inches (16.87 metres) and a mean draft of 13 feet 6 inches (4.11 metres). Her standard displacement was 7,050 long tons (7,160 t) and 9,508 long tons (9,661 t) at full load. [2] [5] Her crew, during peace time, consisted of 29 officers and 429 enlisted men. [6]

Cincinnati was powered by four Westinghouse geared steam turbines, each driving one screw, using steam generated by 12 Yarrow boilers. The engines were designed to produce 90,000 indicated horsepower (67,000 kW) and reach a top speed of 35 knots (65 km/h 40 mph). [2] She was designed to provided a range of 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km 12,000 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h 12 mph), but was only capable of 8,460 nautical miles (15,670 km 9,740 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h 12 mph) [5]

Cincinnati ' s main armament went through many changes while she was being designed. Originally she was to mount ten 6 in (150 mm)/53 caliber guns two on either side at the waist, with the remaining eight mounted in tiered casemates on either side of the fore and aft superstructures. After America's entry into World War I the US Navy worked alongside the Royal Navy and it was deceided to mount four 6-in/53 caliber guns in two twin gun turrets fore and aft and keep the eight guns in the tiered casemates so that she would have an eight gun broadside and, due to limited arcs of fire from the casemate guns, four to six guns firing fore or aft. Her secondary armament consisted of two 3 in (76 mm)/50 caliber anti-aircraft guns in single mounts. Cincinnati was initially built with the capacity to carry 224 mines, but these were removed early in her career to make way for more crew accommodations. She also carried two triple and two twin, above-water, torpedo tube mounts for 21 inches (530 mm) torpedoes. The triple mounts were fitted on either side of the upper deck, aft of the aircraft catapults, and the twin mounts were one deck lower on either side, covered by hatches in the side of the hull. [2] [7] [8]

The ship lacked a full-length waterline armor belt. The sides of her boiler and engine rooms and steering gear were protected by 3 inches (76 mm) of armor. The transverse bulkheads at the end of her machinery rooms were 1.5 inches (38 mm) thick forward and three inches thick aft. The deck over the machinery spaces and steering gear had a thickness of 1.5 inches. The gun turrets were not armored and only provided protection against muzzle blast and the conning tower had 1.5 inches of armor. [8] Cincinnati carried two floatplanes aboard that were stored on the two catapults. Initially these were probably Vought VE-9s until the early 1930s when the ship may have operated OJ-2 until 1935 and Curtiss SOC Seagulls until 1940 when Vought OS2U Kingfishers where used on ships without hangars. [6]

Armament changes

During her career Cincinnati went through several armament changes, some of these changes were save weight, but others were to incress her AA armament. The lower torpedo tube mounts proved to be very wet and were removed, and the openings plated over, before the start of World War II. Another change made before the war was to increase the 3 in (76 mm) guns to eight, all mounted in the ship's waist. After 1940 the lower aft 6 in (150 mm) guns were removed and the casemates plated over for the same reason as the lower torpedo mounts. [7] The ship's anti-aircraft armament were originally augmented by three quadruple 1.1 in (28 mm)/75 gun mounts by early 1942, however, these didn't prove reliable and were replaced by twin 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors guns along with 14 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon cannons by the end of the war. [6] Its also reported that Cincinnati mounted a pair of Army 40mm Bofors guns too. [8]


USS Cincinnati CL-6 - History

USS Cincinnati , a 7050-ton Omaha class light cruiser, was built at Tacoma, Washington. Commissioned in January 1924, she cruised to South America on shakedown and then became part of the Scouting Fleet. Following operations in the Atlantic, Caribbean and Pacific, early in 1927 Cincinnati steamed across the Pacific for a year's tour with the Asiatic Fleet. She mainly served in the Atlantic during 1928-1932, then was assigned to the U.S. Fleet's Battle Force, which was based on the U.S. West Coast. The cruiser briefly revisited the Atlantic for the May 1934 fleet review off New York City, trained Naval Reservists in 1935-1938, and was reassigned to the Atlantic at the end of the decade.

Cincinnati returned to the Pacific in April 1940. She voyaged to Guam and the Philippines late in the year and, in April 1941, joined the Atlantic Fleet for Neutrality Patrol operations. She continued patrol and convoy escort duties after the United States formally entered World War II in December 1941. While serving in the South Atlantic in November 1942, Cincinnati assisted in the interception and destruction of the German blockade runner Annalise Essberger .

The remainder of Cincinnati 's World War II career consisted of Atlantic patrol and convoy operations, among them escorting three convoys to the United Kingdom between March and July 1944, service in the western Mediterranean in August and September of that year, and duty with the Brazil-based Fourth Fleet. In the summer of 1945, after Germany's surrender, she was employed as a midshipmen's training ship. USS Cincinnati was decommissioned in November 1945 and scrapped in 1946.

This page features selected views of USS Cincinnati (CL-6).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

In harbor, circa the mid-1920s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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Underway in harbor, circa the later 1930s.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 450 pixels

Visits Portland, Oregon, circa the later 1930s.
Photographed by the Angelus Commercial Studio, Portland.

Collection of Admiral Harold R. Stark, USN.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 142KB 740 x 600 pixels

Underway off New York City, 8 July 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

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Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off New York City, 8 July 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

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Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off New York City, 9 July 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

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Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Off New York City, 22 March 1944.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

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Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

In New York Harbor, 22 March 1944.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

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Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

In New York Harbor, 22 March 1944.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 137KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

View looking up at the cruiser's mainmast in November 1923, just before she left the New York Navy Yard for speed trials off Rockland, Maine.
View was taken from between the after smokestack and the mainmast. Note the extensive use of blocks on the mast rigging.

Courtesy of the San Francisco Maritime Museum, San Francisco, California, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 93KB 575 x 765 pixels

Vought O2U-1 "Corsair" floatplane
(Bureau # A-7918)

Suspended over a ship's catapult during the later 1920s.
This plane, from Scouting Squadron SIX, is assigned to USS Cincinnati (CL-6).

Collection of Vice Admiral Dixwell Ketcham.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 68KB 740 x 600 pixels

View on deck, looking aft from the ship's bow, showing her forward 6"/53 gun turret and superstructure. Photographed at the New York Navy Yard, 4 July 1942.
Recent alterations are marked and identified.
Note Mark XXXII Mod. 1 Rangefinder on the bridge wings.


USS Cincinnati CL-6 - History

The Cincinnati (LCS 20) is the tenth ship in the Independence-class littoral combat ships and the fifth ship in the U.S. Navy named in honor of the city of Cincinnati, Ohio.

April 10, 2017 The keel authentication ceremony for the future-USS Cincinnati was held at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Ala.

May 5, 2018 The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Cincinnati was christened during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. Penny S. Pritzker, Chicago billionaire and the 38th U.S. Secretary of Commerce, served as sponsor of the ship.

May 21, PCU Cincinnati exited the assembly bay #4 at Austal's facility for the first time and was transported down river, while sitting on a deck barge, to BAE Systems Southeast Shipyard's floating dry-dock Launched on May 22 Moved to Vessel Completion Yard on Oct. 5.

December 20, The Cincinnati moored at Vessel Completion Yard after underway for the first time to conduct Builder's (Alpha) trials.

February 8, 2019 LCS 20 moored at Vessel Completion Yard after a one-day underway for acceptance trials with the INSURV.

June 21, U.S. Navy accepted delivery of the future USS Cincinnati during a short ceremony aboard the ship.

September 28, PCU Cincinnati (Crew 214 - Blue) departed Mobile, Ala., for the last time Moored at Berth 7, West Pier Terminal in Port of Gulfport, Miss., for a nine-day visit in preparation for its commissioning ceremony, on Saturday afternoon.

October 3, Cmdr. Jedediah A. Kloppel relieved Cmdr. Kurt A. Braeckel as CO of the Cincinnati (Blue) during a pierside ceremony in Port of Gulfport.

October 5, USS Cincinnati was commissioned during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony in Gulfport, Mississippi.

October 10, The Cincinnati moored at Wharf C1 on Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a two-day port call Moored at Quay Wall East on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Va., from Oct. 14-29 Transited the Windward Passage southbound on Nov. 1 Moored at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a brief stop to refuel on Nov. 1.

November 4, USS Cincinnati moored at Pier 16 in Port of Cristobal, Panama, for a one-day stop to refuel Transited the Panama Canal southbound on Nov. 5 Moored at Marina Fuel Dock in Golfito, Costa Rica, from Nov. 7-10 Moored at Cruise Ship Dock 3 in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, from Nov. 15-18.

November 20, USS Cincinnati moored at Berth 5, Pier 5 in its homeport of Naval Base San Diego, Calif., for the first time Underway for routine operations from Jan. 15-16.

January 30, 2020 The Cincinnati moored at Bravo Pier, Naval Air Station North Island for a brief stop to onload ammo before underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Returned home on Jan. 31 Underway again from Feb. 12-13 Day-long underway for Final Contract Trials (FCT) with the INSURV on March 4.

April 3, LCS 20 moored at Berth 5, Pier 5 on Naval Base San Diego after a three-day underway off the coast of southern California Underway again from April 29- May 1, May 11-18 and June 8-11.

September 21, USS Cincinnati returned to homeport after a brief underway off the coast of San Diego.

October 2, The Rotational LCS Crew 206, commanded by Cmdr. Aaron Anderson, assumed command of the Cincinnati after completing a crew exchange with the USS Manchester (LCS 14).

October 13, USS Cincinnati moored at Berth 5, Pier 5 after a brief underway off the coast of San Diego Underway again from Nov. 2-3, Nov. 5-7 and Nov. 30- Dec. 1 Moored at Bravo Pier for a brief stop on Dec. 10.

January 18, 2021 The Cincinnati moored at Berth 5, Pier 5 on Naval Base San Diego after a three-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway again from Feb. 1-3, Feb. 8-13 and Feb. 17-27 Moored at Bravo Pier for a brief stop to onload ammo on April 1.

April 9, The Cincinnati moored at Berth 5, Pier 5 after a four-day underway for routine training off the coast of southern California Underway again from May 17-18 and May 19 Moored at Bravo Pier for a brief stop to onload ammo on May 20 Returned home on May 21 Underway again from June 1-7.


Ohio Native Proud To Serve On The New USS Cincinnati

Two Ohioans are among the crew of the USS Cincinnati being commissioned Saturday in Gulfport, Miss.

Chief Petty Officer Kara Rush of Shaker Heights, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland, tells WVXU she feels a sense of pride to be part of the crew on a newly commissioned ship.

"Commissioning a new ship is a sense of heritage within the military where you get to build a ship from the ground up," the gunner's mate says. "A part of you is going to always be with that ship."

The fact that it carries the name of a city from her home state? That's icing on the cake.

"It feels amazing, actually," she says with a laugh. "To be honest, Ohio doesn't get recognized for a lot of things, I'll be honest about that, and for an actual Navy war ship to be recognized in Ohio, that's a big honor."

Cincinnati and Cleveland have a history of disliking each other, but Rush - the Cleveland native - isn't bothered by that.

"I mean it's our sister city so anytime Ohio's recognized it's a win for all of us." She does have a message for the people of Ohio: "The Browns are going to be big this year!"

The 70-member crew's first mission is to get the ship home safely. That process begins following Saturday's commissioning ceremony. The USS Cincinnati will be stationed at Naval Base San Diego.

The USS Cincinnati is a littoral combat ship, meaning it is a "high-speed, agile, shallow draft, focused-mission surface combatant designed to conduct surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and mine countermeasures missions in the littoral region," according to Austal USA, the company that built it.

The ship was delivered to the Navy in June by Austal USA, which has a more than $4.5 billion contract to provide 19 ships. The USS Cincinnati is the 10th Independence-variant littoral combat ship and will be the 18th LCS to enter the fleet, according to the company.

As WVXU previously reported, the ship includes two LM2500 marine gas turbine engines built at GE Aviation in Evendale. "Each LM2500 engine produces over 29,500 horsepower, propelling the ship to speeds in excess of 40 knots, or 46 miles per hour," GE says.

Cincinnati council member and Navy veteran David Mann traveled to Alabama for the ship's christening ceremony in May 2018. He presented several items from the city to be enshrined aboard the ship. A key to the city, a history of previous USS Cincinnati vessels, several medallions of sentimental value, and a letter from the mayor were added to a small aluminum box that was welded to the inside of the ship's mast like a time capsule during a "mast stepping" ceremony.

Mann will be on hand again for the commissioning to present the "long glass" to the First Officer of the Watch.

This is the Navy's fifth vessel to carry the name "Cincinnati."

    was an ironclad river gunboat commissioned in 1862 that sunk twice in battle and raised each time. It was sold in 1866. was a protected cruiser in service from 1894 to 1919. was a light cruiser commissioned in 1924, on patrols in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II, and scrapped in 1946. was a Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarine in service from 1978 to 1996.
  • USS Queen City (Tinclad #26) commissioned in April 1863 and ultimately blown up and destroyed by Confederate forces.

(Information courtesy of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County and the City of Cincinnati.)


Omaha Class Cruisers

The Omaha class cruisers were the only American cruisers to be ordered during the First World War, although they weren't completed until the early 1920s. Although they were somewhat outdated even when they were completed they remained in service into the Second World War, where they were used in the south Pacific, the Aleutians and the Atlantic.

The US Navy had stopped building cruisers ten years before work began on the Omaha class, but there were some clear links to the earlier designs. The previous Chester or Salem class of 1905 were flush decked four funnelled cruisers, with very little superstructure, and a clear resemblance to the famous flush-decked destroyers. The big different was size - the Chester class ships had a displacement of 3,750t, were 423ft 2in long and 47ft 1in wide. The Omaha class cruisers were twice as heavy, at, 7,050t normal displacement, and were 555ft long and 55ft 5in wide, so were much more substantial vessels.

The US Navy had spent most of the intervening decade arguing about the type of cruisers they needed, producing a wide range of designs from very light scout cruisers up to massive battlecruisers. The Omaha class cruisers were ordered as part of the 1916 naval programme, which also included a large number of destroyers and fast cruisers.

The Omaha class ships were originally designed to carry ten 6in guns in a rather unusual configuration. Two were to be carried in the waist and the remaining eight in individual casemates. These were to be carried on either side of the fore and aft superstructures, with two levels of casemates in each position. The aim was to maximise forward and aft firepower, with four guns being able to fire directly ahead or behind the ship. Originally five guns could fire on the broadside, but this was reduced to four when the waist guns were deleted early in the design process. The casemated guns also had a limited arc of fire, so targets that weren't directly ahead or behind the ships could only be hit by two. They were designed on the assumption that cruisers would either be chasing weaker enemies or being chased by stronger foes, and so would need to concentrate their firepower fore and aft. Spotting was to be performed by aircraft, and they were designed to use a fixed catapult on the quarterdeck, but they were built with trainable catapults in the waist.

This layout soon came in for criticism. After the American entry into the First World War the US Navy worked alongside the Royal Navy. Most contemporary British cruisers had more powerful broadsides, and turret mounted guns fore and aft, with a wider arc of fire than the casemated guns of the Omaha class. To compensate the Omahas were given two twin 6in gun mounts, carried fore and aft. This meant that they could fire six guns at targets directly ahead or behind, four at targets off to one side (two in casemates and two in the mounting), or a broadside of eight guns. Even this design wasn't without its flaws - the lower pair of rear casemates turned out to be too close to the water, and were thus very wet in action and by the start of the Second World War they had been removed from the surviving ships. The next American cruisers, the Pensacola class, carried their guns in superfiring turrets on the centre line, a much more flexible layout.

The number of torpedo tubes was also increased. Originally they had been designed with twin banks of 21in tubes. They were built with the twin bank and with two triple banks of torpedo tubes. In service the twin tubes were removed, so by the Second World War they had six 21in torpedo tubes in two triple banks. The secondary armament was also changed, generally by removing guns to save weight. They caught also lay mines.

Visually the Omaha class cruisers greatly resembled the flush-deck destroyers, with four funnels, a small rear superstructure and larger forward superstructure. Their machinery used the unit system, with twelve boilers in four boiler rooms, two forward and two aft. The turbine rooms were between the fore and aft boiler rooms.

The boilers and turbines installed varied depending on the builders. Production was split between three builders - Todd of Seattle, Cramp of Philadelphia and Bethlehem of Quincy.

CL-4 to CL-6 were built by Todd. They used Yarrow boilers and Westinghouse turbines, and shorter range cruising turbines.

CL-7 and CL-8 were built by Bethlehem, and used Yarrow boilers, Curtis turbines and shorter range cruising turbines.

CL-9 to CL-13 were built by Cramp. They had White-Forster boilers, Parsons turbines and longer range cruising turbines.

For their size the Omaha ships were given powerful engines, which gave them a top speed of 34-35kts. They were designed to have an endurance of 10,000nm at 10kts, but rarely managed to achieve this.

Service Records

Omaha (CL-4) served in the Atlantic for most of her career, taking part in the Neutrality Patrol before the American entry into the war and the campaign against Axis blockade runners afterwards. She also supported Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the south of France.

Milwaukee (CL-5) was in the Pacific from 1928-1940, then moved to the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic. After the American entry into the war she served in the Caribbean and briefly in the Pacific, before returning to the Atlantic from 1942-44. In 1944 she was given to the Soviet Union where she served as the Murmanskuntil 1949.

Cincinnati (CL-6) served in the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Asiatic Fleets between the wars, but from 1941-45 served in the Atlantic. Like the Omaha she took part in Operation Dragoon.

Raleigh (CL-7) served in the Atlantic and Pacific before the war. She was based at Pearl Harbor from 1938 and was hit by Japanese torpedoes during the attack on Pearl Harbor of 7 December 1941. After her repairs she served in the Aleutians and the North Pacific.

Detroit (CL-8) was at Pearl Harbor. She served in the Pacific for the rest of the war, operating in areas as far apart as the Aleutians and the South East Pacific.

Richmond (CL-9) served as flagship of the Scouting Force, then the Light Cruiser Division. She then served on the China Station (1927), the US East Coast (1934-37) and in the Pacific (1937-1940). She then joined the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic. After the US entry into the war she escorted convoys in the Pacific (1941-43) then moved to the North Pacific, where she fought in the Aleutians campaign.

Concord (CL-10) served in the Atlantic from 1925-31, then with the Scouting Force and the Battle Force. After the American entry into the war she served on convoy escort duty in the south-east Pacific, then in the Aleutians from April 1944 onwards.

Trenton (CL-11) served in the South Pacific from 1942-44 then in the Aleutians, where she remained for the rest of the war.

Marblehead (CL-12) was in the Philippines when the Japanese attacked and was involved in the disastrous campaign in the Dutch East Indies. She was badly damaged by Japanese bombs but reached Ceylon. After being repaired she served in the Atlantic, then supported Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the south of France.

Memphis (CL-13) initially served in the Atlantic, but was also deployed in Europe and Australasia. She was based in the Pacific from 1928 and in Alaska from 1939-41. She then became part of the Neutrality Patrol in the Atlantic before spending most of the Second World War in the South Atlantic. During 1945 she was the flagship, Commander USN Forces in Europe, based in the Mediterranean.


Contents

After a shakedown cruise off South America, Cincinnati joined the Scouting Fleet in June 1924, for operations along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. With this force, she joined in fleet maneuvers in the Pacific and off the Panama Canal Zone in spring 1925, then resumed Atlantic and Caribbean operations until early in 1927.

On 17 February 1927, Cincinnati sailed from Balboa, C.Z., for duty in the Far East, based at Shanghai until October, then at Manila, and again at Shanghai from February-April 1928. On the long cruise home to the east coast, she joined in exercises off Oahu and, carried men from Honolulu to Corinto, Nicaragua, returning to Newport, R.I. on 25 July, for operations on the east coast until 1932.

Early in 1932, she joined the Battle Force, US Fleet, in the Pacific, taking part in the Fleet's cruise to the east coast from April-July 1934 for the Presidential Review of 31 May at New York. Returning to the west coast, she operated on summer training cruises for naval reservists from 1935 to 1938, then was reassigned to Atlantic duty during 1939.


Mục lục

Cincinnati được chế tạo bởi hãng Todd Dry Dock and Construction Co., Tacoma, Washington, nơi nó được đặt lườn vào ngày 15 tháng 5 năm 1920. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 23 tháng 5 năm 1921, được đỡ đầu bởi bà Charles E. Tudor, phu nhân một quan chức của thành phố Cincinnati và được cho nhập biên chế vào ngày 1 tháng 1 năm 1924 dưới quyền chỉ huy của hạm trưởng, Đại tá Hải quân Charles P. Nelson. [1] [2]

Những năm giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

Sau chuyến đi chạy thử máy ngoài khơi Nam Mỹ, Cincinnati gia nhập Hạm đội Tuần tiễu vào tháng 6 năm 1924 để hoạt động dọc theo bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và tại vùng biển Caribbe. Cùng với lực lượng này, nó đã tham gia các cuộc cơ động hạm đội tại Thái Bình Dương và ngoài khơi Khu vực kênh đào Panama vào mùa Xuân năm 1925, rồi tiếp nối các hoạt động tại Đại Tây Dương và Caribbe cho đến đầu năm 1927. [2]

Vào ngày 17 tháng 2 năm 1927, Cincinnati khởi hành từ Balboa, Panama để hoạt động tại Viễn Đông, đặt căn cứ tại Thượng Hải cho đến tháng 10, và sau đó là Manila, rồi trở lại Thượng Hải từ tháng 2 đến tháng 4 năm 1928. Trên chuyến đi dài quay trở về nhà đến Bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ, nó tham gia các cuộc tập trận ngoài khơi Oahu và vận chuyển nhân sự từ Honolulu đến Corinto, Nicaragua, trước khi quay trở về Newport, Rhodes Island vào ngày 25 tháng 7 để hoạt động tại khu vực Bờ Đông. [2]

Đầu năm 1932, Cincinnati tham gia Lực lượng Chiến trận thuộc Hạm đội Hoa Kỳ tại Thái Bình Dương, và đã tham gia vào chuyến đi của Hạm đội đến Bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ từ tháng 4 đến tháng 7 năm 1934 cho cuộc Duyệt binh Tổng thống vào ngày 31 tháng 5 tại New York. Quay trở lại khu vực Bờ Tây, nó hoạt động trong các chuyến đi huấn luyện mùa hè dành cho quân nhân hải quân dự bị từ năm 1935 đến năm 1938, rồi chuyển sang hoạt động tại Đại Tây Dương vào năm 1939. [2]

Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai Sửa đổi

Cincinnati đặt căn cứ tại Trân Châu Cảng từ tháng 4 năm 1940, di chuyển đến Guam và Philippines trong các nhiệm vụ vận chuyển vào cuối năm đó. Đến tháng 3 năm 1941, nó quay trở lại khu vực Đại Tây Dương tham gia các cuộc tuần tra đang được mở rộng ở phía Tây Đại Tây Dương. Vào lúc chiến tranh nổ ra, nó tiếp tục các chuyến tuần tra và hộ tống tại Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribbe, ngăn chặn các tàu chiến Pháp tại Martinique, và săn lùng các tàu buôn Đức đang tìm cách vượt qua sự phong tỏa. Cùng với tàu tuần dương Milwaukee và tàu khu trục Somers, Cincinnati khám phá ra một chiếc như vậy, SS Annaliese Essberger, vào ngày 21 tháng 11 năm 1942. Thủy thủ đoàn Đức tìm cách đánh đắm tàu của họ, nhưng một đội đổ bộ đã lên được tàu để truy tìm nguồn gốc con tàu và bắt giữ toàn bộ 62 người trên tàu làm tù binh chiến tranh trước khi nó chìm. [2]

Được đại tu tại New York vào đầu năm 1944, Cincinnati tiếp tục phục vụ như là tàu chỉ huy hộ tống cho ba đoàn tàu vận tải từ New York đi đến Belfast trong thời gian từ tháng 3 đến tháng 7, bảo vệ cho việc vận chuyển nhân sự và thiết bị cần thiết trong cuộc đổ bộ lên lục địa châu Âu. Vào ngày 28 tháng 7, nó khởi hành từ Norfolk để tuần tra khu vực Tây Địa Trung Hải vào lúc diễn ra cuộc đổ bộ lên miền Nam nước Pháp, rồi quay trở về New York vào ngày 9 tháng 9. Sau một đợt đại tu, nó gia nhập Đệ Tứ hạm đội tại Recife, Brasil vào ngày 17 tháng 11 để tuần tra các tuyến đượng vận tải hàng hải phía Nam Đại Tây Dương cho đến khi chiến tranh kết thúc tại châu Âu. [2]

Vào mùa Hè năm 1945, Cincinnati đón lên tàu học viên sĩ quan trong hai chuyến đi huấn luyện và vào ngày 29 tháng 9 nó đi đến Philadelphia, nơi nó ngừng hoạt động vào ngày 1 tháng 11 năm 1945 và bị tháo dỡ vào ngày 27 tháng 2 năm 1946. [2]

Cincinnati được tặng thưởng một Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II. [1] [2]


USS Cincinnati CL-6 - History

By CHRISTIAN LOPEZ | STARS AND STRIPES Published: October 4, 2019

The Navy plans to commission its newest littoral combat ship, the USS Cincinnati, during a ceremony Saturday in Gulfport, Miss.

A departure in design from its sister vessels, the LCS was plagued with problems during its development but is showing potential. For example, an LCS recently successfully launched an advanced type of over-the-horizon ship-killing missile during an exercise near Guam.

Former Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, the USS Cincinnati’s sponsor, is slated to follow naval tradition by shattering a bottle of sparkling wine across the ship’s bow and giving the order to “man our ship and bring her to life!”

Rep. Brad Wenstrup, R-Ohio, will give the principal address.

“USS Cincinnati and her crew will play an important role in the defense of our nation and maritime freedom,” Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer said in a statement.

Farther north on Saturday, the Navy will christen its newest Virginia-class attack submarine, the USS Oregon, in Groton, Conn.

The Cincinnati was built by General Dynamics and Austal USA. It holds up to 40 sailors and carries two MH-60R/S Seahawk helicopters and a MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned autonomous helicopter.

The ship is the ninth of the Independence class and the 20th LCS of a planned 32 ships in two designs, Independence and Freedom, according to naval-technology.com.

The 418-foot-long vessel is capable of more than 47 knots, or 54 mph, according to the ship’s website.

“She stands as proof of what teamwork – from civilian to contractor to military – can accomplish,” Spencer said in the statement. “This fast, agile platform will deliver her motto, ‘Strength in Unity’ worldwide thanks to their efforts.”

The $12.4 billion LCS program, begun during President George W. Bush’s administration, was assailed by critics for cost overruns, faulty design and poor performance at sea.

The warship redeemed itself somewhat when the USS Coronado deployed to the western Pacific in 2016-17, according to the Navy Times. Although mechanical issues laid the vessel up for a month in Hawaii, the ship and its crew completed an uneventful remainder of the cruise, the newspaper reported.

And Tuesday, another LCS, the USS Gabrielle Giffords, successfully fired the latest version of a Naval Strike Missile at a target ship, the decommissioned frigate USS Ford, while at sea near Guam. It was the first test of the missile in the region.

The Navy in a statement Thursday said the Ford was targeted and sunk by fire from several ships and aircraft during the Griffin Pacific exercise with Singapore.

The Cincinnati will be homeported at Naval Base San Diego, according to the Navy.

Littoral combat ships are built to conduct mine countermeasures, antisubmarine warfare or surface warfare missions in near shore or open ocean environments in a swift and nimble manner.

The Cincinnati is the fifth Navy ship to be named after Ohio’s third-largest city. The first was a stern-wheel casemate gunboat that served during the Civil War and was decommissioned following the war. The second served as a cruiser from 1894 until the end of the Spanish-American War in 1919.

The third ship to bear the name was a light cruiser commissioned in 1924 that earned a battle star for service in World War II and then was decommissioned after the war ended in 1945. The fourth Cincinnati was a Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine that served the Navy from 1978 to 1995.


Watch the video: Cincinnati CL-6 Laser