Humphrey Babour

Humphrey Babour

Humphrey Babour was born in Glasgow. A talented centre-forward, Barbour played for Third Lanark and Airdrie in the Scottish League.

In November 1888, Babour moved to London to work at at Royal Arsenal in Woolwich, one of the government's main munition factories.

Barbour made his debut for Woolwich Arsenal in the 1888-89 season. He joined a team that included J. M. Charteris, Peter Connolly, David Danskin, Richard Horsington, Fred Beardsley, Joseph Bates, John McBean and W. Scott.

Woolwich Arsenal continued to make good progress and won the London Charity Cup in 1890 and the London Senior Cup in 1891.

The club entered the FA Cup in 1892 but was knocked out by First Division side Derby County. Barbour joined Clapton Orient in 1893. During his time at the club he scored 59 goals in 71 games.


The Old Manse in Kilbarchan : Information from an old document

The Old Manse at No. 14 Steeple Street is one of the oldest houses in Kilbarchan. A Latin inscription on a plaque above the main door states that the dwelling house was built in 1730 in the curateship of R I (Robert Johnstoun). Robert Johnstoun was the parish minister from 1701 until 1738.

The manse was a substantial building for the time and continued to house the parish ministers until early in the nineteenth century. It was occupied by the Rev. John Warner from 1739-86, the Rev. Patrick Maxwell 1787-1806, and for some years by Rev. Robert Douglas (parish minister from 1806-1846). The latter two ministers respectively contributed the accounts on Kilbarchan Parish in the Old Statistical Account (1791) and the New Statistical Account (1845). In 1811 a new parish manse was built and the old manse with a small green or bleachfield was sold to a Greenock merchant, James Stewart, in 1817.

Recently, I was fortunate to have access to an old document in the possession of the current owners of the Old Manse. This document contains information on the manse and the adjacent properties with the names of some of the owners dating back to the 1750s. Some of these owners were people who were born or married in Kilbarchan Parish between 1711 and 1740, a period when Kilbarchan Parish Records are missing. From this single document on the Old Manse and a little further research, some interesting information on Kilbarchan’s history has come to light.

The document clearly states that John Warner, Minister of the Gospel at Kilbarchan, possessed the Old Manse ‘with court, offices houses and garden and roads and passages to and from it’. Other owners of adjacent properties in the eighteenth century were John Park, Annabella Sempill, John Barbour, and Agnes Hair, who was the relict (widow) of Humphrey Barbour, and in the nineteenth century the Ramsay family who owned the manse and the surrounding land.
John Park was a Kilbarchan weaver who owned adjacent property. He must have been a prosperous weaver as he was stated as owner of a little yard at the foot and south end of the manse garden and houses which he let to his sub-tenants and cottars, lying within the Vicar Lands of Kilbarchan.

Annabella Sempill, relict of the deceased Ebenezer Campbell, a merchant in Kilbarchan, was stated to have at some time owned a house, a barn and backhouses on the east of the manse. Annabella Sempill’s birth is unrecorded in parish records, but further research revealed that she was born in 1729 and died in 1812. She was the daughter of Robert Sempill, the last Laird of Belltrees, who sold his lands of Thirdpart in 1758 and retired to Kilbarchan. He lived in Belltrees Cottage and is known for his longevity, surviving to the grand old age of 102. He is famed for having witnessed the burning of the last witch in Paisley when he was a child. Annabella married Ebenezer Campbell, the son of an Ayrshire clergyman, and had four daughters, all born between 1751 and 1756. Ebenezer was still resident in Kilbarchan in 1762, but later went to Jamaica where he died.

John Barbour and Humphrey Barbour are mentioned in the document as formerly owning bleachfields adjacent to the manse. Initially it appeared that this John Barbour was John Barbour of Law (d. 1794), the son of Baillie John Barbour (1701- 1770). Both father and son were prosperous linen merchants in Kilbarchan. The document also mentions a house and yard on the east side of the manse garden formerly belonged to the deceased Humphrey Barbour, Merchant in Kilbarchan, and thereafter by Agnes Hair his relict (widow).

However, this presented a bit of an enigma. John of Law had a younger brother, Humphrey, who was born in 1743 and died in 1817. But his wife was Elizabeth Freeland, not Agnes Hair. So who was this Humphrey Barbour named in the document? As he was a merchant who owned a bleachfield he was, presumably, another member of the linen Barbour family, but where did he fit in?

There is no mention of the births or a marriage between Humphrey Barbour and Agnes Hair in Kilbarchan Parish Records. Were they born and married in the years 1711 to 1740 when Kilbarchan Parish Records are missing? Further research has revealed an alternative primary source which verifies their existence. A four page pamphlet entitled ‘Answers for Agnes Hair relict of Humphry Barbour merchant in Kilbarchan, defender, to the petition of John Barbour merchant in Kilbarchan and William Blackwood in Oldyeard of Lochquinnoch, pursuers’ was written in 1752. A further connected reference to Humphrey and Agnes appears again in 1766 in Decisions of the Court of Session. In a dispute (Ann Murray v Elizabeth Drew 18.6.1766) concerning the legality of a bill of exchange, mention is made of a legal precedent in 1753 where Humphrey Barbour some days before his death delivered two bills to his wife, Agnes Hair. The Lords had found that these bills were properly conveyed to Agnes Hair and she won her case against John Barbour.

From this evidence it can be concluded that Humphrey Barbour (born and married between 1711 and 1740) was a younger brother of Baillie John Barbour and in 1752 after Humphrey’s death, Baillie John Barbour was disputing the right of his sister-in-law, Agnes Hair’s entitlement to the two bills Humphrey had delivered to his wife.

John Ramsay and later his heir James Ramsay are recorded in the Old Manse document as owners of both the Old Manse and adjacent properties and old bleachfields on the north east of the burn from the mid-1800s until the 1930s. The Ramsay family ran a very successful business as fleshers (butchers). What is now the dentist‘s surgery was their butcher’s shop and the manse garage, behind the premises of Kilbarchan Chiropody, (formerly the Bull Inn) was their slaughter house.

The document also reveals that John Ramsay was a shrewd businessman. When Milliken Estate was sold in the 1880s he purchased all or part of Over Johnstone Farm from the owners of Milliken Estate and in 1888 and 1889 sold off plots for building. By the 1891 Census Nos. 1-11 Easwaldbank and Reston Cottage in St Barchan’s Road had been erected on these plots and were occupied mainly by local weavers and tradesmen. The probable builders were Matthew Blair and John Gardner. They certainly were the builders of No 8 Easwaldbank. This plot was purchased by them jointly in 1889 and in 1891 the building housed a number of families including John Gardner and his family.

The document on the Old Manse is of some significance because it has given clear indication of lines of research into information on little-known residents in the village in the eighteenth century and the building of Easwaldbank. If anyone in Kilbarchan holds any old documents which might similarly add to the village history please contact Helen Calcluth or Russell Young, or e-mail The Advertizer.


Humphrey M. Barbour World War I Scrapbooks

Almost all the items in the collection are tipped or bound in to a set of four cloth-covered scrapbook volumes of 29 cm., with the title "With the 42nd Division 1917-19" stamped on the spines. The volumes contain a total of 678 leaves virtually all the rectos, and more than half the versos, bear content. Barbour took great care in the arrangement of his materials, to achieve a chronologically organized textual, documentary, and pictorial account of his military service, from his departure from New York (October 1917) to his return (April 1919). Nothing in the volumes indicates precisely when Barbour put the scrapbooks together material evidence suggests a date prior to World War II. Included in the books is a memoir, whose 220-odd typescript leaves, organized into eleven chapters, are spread throughout the volumes. The memoir's prose is not obviously retrospective much of it clearly derives from passages in letters written by Barbour to his mother, seemingly adopted without a great deal of editing. This is especially true of the earlier parts of the memoir, covering the period before the offensives of July-November 1918. Later parts of the memoir seem not at all epistolary, and may have been inspired by a journal. In any case, Barbour's prose is polished and engaging, with a frequent eye for telling detail.

Accompanying the memoir are illustrative materials of various kinds. There are a good many original photographic prints, presumably taken by Barbour or members of his unit and retained by him for eventual use in the scrapbooks. More common are halftone photographs clipped from periodicals and other publications. Some of these are referenced in the text of the memoir and others bear an obvious relation to it, but most lack captions (as do most of the photographic prints). There are also many photographic postcards, usually of towns or other locations through which Barbour passed. All told, there are more than 400 photographic images in the books. There are also a number of maps.

Equally important in carrying the narrative are more than 500 military documents and bits of ephemera saved by Barbour and integrated into the scrapbooks. Many of these documents are bound in to the scrapbooks as independent leaves, to make both sides accessible. There are divisional, regimental, battalion, and company orders memoranda, reports, plans, and circulars (including many daily summaries of intelligence) fire orders and reports of fire and drawings of sections of the front. A few are printed most are typed or handwritten. There are also occasional pieces of printed ephemera, especially in vol. 4.


Contents

The Wars of Scottish Independence between England and Scotland began in 1296 and initially the English were successful under the command of Edward I, having won victories at the Battle of Dunbar (1296) and at the Capture of Berwick (1296). [11] The removal of John Balliol from the Scottish throne also contributed to the English success. [11] The Scots had been victorious in defeating the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. This was countered, however, by Edward I's victory at the Battle of Falkirk (1298). [11] By 1304, Scotland had been conquered, but in 1306 Robert the Bruce seized the Scottish throne and the war was reopened. [11]

After the death of Edward I, his son Edward II of England came to the throne in 1307 but was incapable of providing the determined leadership his father had shown, and the English position soon became more difficult. [11]

In 1313, Bruce demanded the allegiance of all remaining Balliol supporters, under threat of losing their lands, as well as the surrender of the English garrison at Stirling Castle. [9] The castle was one of the most important castles held by the English, as it commanded the route north into the Scottish Highlands. [11] It was besieged in 1314 by Robert the Bruce's younger brother, Edward Bruce, and an agreement was made that if the castle was not relieved by mid-summer it would be surrendered to the Scots. [11]

The English could not ignore this challenge and prepared and equipped a substantial campaign. It is known that Edward II requested 2,000 heavily armoured cavalry and 25,000 infantry, many of whom were likely armed with longbows, from England, Wales and Ireland it is estimated no more than half the infantry actually arrived, but the English army was still by far the largest ever to invade Scotland. The Scottish army probably numbered around 6,000 men, [9] including no more than 500 mounted forces. [11] Unlike the English, the Scottish cavalry was probably unequipped for charging enemy lines and suitable only for skirmishing and reconnaissance. The Scottish infantry was likely armed with axes, swords and pikes, and included only a few bowmen. [11]

The precise numerical advantage of the English forces relative to the Scottish forces is unknown, but modern researchers estimate that the Scottish faced English forces one-and-a-half to two or three times their size. [12]

Edward II and his advisors were aware of the places the Scots were likely to challenge them and sent orders for their troops to prepare for an enemy established in boggy ground near the River Forth, near Stirling. [11] The English appear to have advanced in four divisions. The Scots assembled defensive formations known as 'schiltrons', which were strong defensive squares of men with pikes. [13] [11] Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray, commanded the Scottish vanguard, which was stationed about a mile south of Stirling, near the church of St. Ninian, while the king commanded the rearguard at the entrance to the New Park. His brother Edward led the third division. The fourth division was nominally under the youthful Walter the Steward, but actually under the command of Sir James Douglas. [14] The Scottish archers used yew-stave longbows and, though these were not weaker than or inferior to English longbows, there were fewer Scottish archers, [15] possibly only 500. These archers played little part in the battle. [16] There is first-hand evidence in a poem, written just after the battle by the captured Carmelite friar Robert Baston, that one or both sides employed slingers and crossbowmen. [17]

Location of the battlefield Edit

The exact site of the Battle of Bannockburn has been debated for many years, [18] but most modern historians agree that the traditional site, [19] where a visitor centre and statue have been erected, is not correct. [20]

A large number of alternative locations have been considered but modern researchers believe only two merit serious consideration: [21]

  • An area of peaty ground outside the village of Balquhiderock known as the Dryfield, about .75 miles (1.21 km) east of the traditional site. [22]
  • The Carse of Balquhiderock, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northeast of the traditional site. This location is accepted by the National Trust as the most likely site. [23]

First day of battle Edit

Most medieval battles were short-lived, lasting only a few hours, so the Battle of Bannockburn is unusual in that it lasted two days. [11] On 23 June 1314 two English cavalry formations advanced. The first was commanded by the Earl of Gloucester and by the Earl of Hereford. [11]

They encountered a body of Scots led by Robert the Bruce. [11] Bruce and Henry de Bohun, nephew of the Earl of Hereford, faced off in what became a celebrated instance of single combat. [11] Bohun charged at Bruce and, when the two passed side by side, Bruce split Bohun's head with his axe. [11] [24] The Scots then rushed the English forces under Gloucester's and Hereford's command, who retreated, struggling back over the Bannockburn. [25]

The second English cavalry force was commanded by Robert Clifford and Henry de Beaumont. Their forces included Sir Thomas de Grey of Heaton, father of the chronicler Thomas Grey. The younger Grey described the battle:

Robert Lord de Clifford and Henry de Beaumont, with three hundred men-at-arms, made a circuit upon the other side of the wood towards the castle, keeping the open ground. Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray, Robert de Brus's nephew, who was leader of the Scottish advanced guard, hearing that his uncle had repulsed the advanced guard of the English on the other side of the wood, thought that he must have his share, and issuing from the wood with his division marched across the open ground towards the two afore-named lords.

Sir Henry de Beaumont called to his men: "Let us wait a little let them come on give them room".

"Sir," said Sir Thomas Gray, "I doubt that whatever you give them now, they will have all too soon".

"Very well" exclaimed the said Henry, "if you are afraid, be off".

"Sir," answered the said Thomas, "it is not from fear that I shall fly this day."

So saying, he spurred in between Beaumont and Sir William Deyncourt and charged into the thick of the enemy. William was killed, Thomas was taken prisoner, his horse being killed on the pikes, and he himself carried off with the Scots on foot when they marched off, having utterly routed the squadron of the said two lords. Some of the English fled to the castle, others to the king's army, which having already left the road through the wood had debouched upon a plain near the water of Forth beyond Bannockburn, an evil, deep, wet marsh, where the said English army unharnessed and remained all night, having sadly lost confidence and being too much disaffected by the events of the day.

Second day of battle Edit

During the night the English forces crossed the stream known as the Bannockburn, establishing their position on the plain beyond it. [11] A Scottish knight, Alexander Seton, who was fighting in the service of Edward II of England, deserted the English camp and told Bruce that English morale was low and encouraged him to attack. [11]

In the morning the Scots advanced from New Park. [11] Not long after daybreak, Edward was surprised to see the Scottish pikemen emerge from the cover of the woods and advance towards his position. As Bruce's army drew nearer, they paused and knelt in prayer. Edward reportedly said in surprise, "They pray for mercy!" "For mercy, yes," one of his attendants replied, "but from God, not you. These men will conquer or die." [27]

The Earl of Gloucester had argued with the Earl of Hereford over who should lead the vanguard into battle. He had also tried to persuade the king that the battle should be postponed. This led the king to accuse him of cowardice. Goaded by the accusation, the Earl of Gloucester advanced to meet the Scots. [11] Few accompanied Gloucester and, when he reached the Scottish lines, he was quickly surrounded and killed. [11]

The English were gradually pushed back and ground down by the Scots' schiltrons. [11] The English longbowmen attempted to support the advance of the knights but were ordered to stop shooting, as they were causing casualties among their own. The English then attempted to deploy their English and Welsh longbowmen to flank the advancing Scots, but they were dispersed by 500 Scottish cavalry under the Marischal Sir Robert Keith. [28] (Although the Scottish cavalry is sometimes described as light cavalry, this appears to be a misinterpretation of Barbour's statement that these were men-at-arms on lighter horses than those of their English counterparts. [29] )

The English cavalry was hemmed in against the Bannockburn, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre. [11] Unable to hold their formations, they broke rank. [11] It soon became clear to Aymer de Valence and Giles d'Argentan (reputedly the third-best knight in Europe) that the English had lost the battle and Edward II needed at all costs to be led to safety. Seizing the reins of the king's horse, they dragged him away, closely followed by 500 knights of the royal bodyguard. [30]

Once they were clear of the battle d'Argentan turned to the king and said: "Sire, your protection was committed to me, but since you are safely on your way, I will bid you farewell for never yet have I fled from a battle, nor will I now." He turned his horse to charge back into the ranks of Scottish, where he was overborne and slain. [31]

English retreat Edit

Edward fled with his personal bodyguard and panic spread among the remaining troops, turning their defeat into a rout. King Edward with about 500 men first fled for Stirling Castle where Sir Philip de Moubray, commander of the castle, turned him away as the castle would shortly be surrendered to the Scots. [32] Then, pursued by James Douglas and a small troop of horsemen, Edward fled to Dunbar Castle, from which he took a ship to Berwick. From the carnage of Bannockburn, the rest of the army tried to escape to the safety of the English border, 90 miles (140 km) south. Many were killed by the pursuing Scottish army or by the inhabitants of the countryside they passed through.

Historian Peter Reese wrote that "only one sizeable group of men – all foot soldiers – made good their escape to England." [33] These were a force of Welsh spearmen who were kept together by their commander, Sir Maurice de Berkeley. The majority of them reached Carlisle. [33] Weighing the available evidence, Reese concludes that "it seems doubtful if even a third of the foot soldiers returned to England." [33] If his estimate is accurate, of 16,000 English infantrymen, about 11,000 were killed. The English chronicler Thomas Walsingham gave the number of English men-at-arms who were killed as 700, [6] while 500 more men-at-arms were spared for ransom. [7] The Scottish losses appear to have been comparatively light, with only two knights among those killed. [34]

The immediate aftermath was the surrender of Stirling Castle, one of Scotland's most important fortresses, to King Robert. He then slighted (razed) it to prevent it from being retaken. Nearly as important was the surrender of Bothwell Castle where a sizeable party of English nobles, including the Earl of Hereford, had taken refuge. [35] In exchange for the captured nobles, Edward II released Robert's wife Elizabeth de Burgh, sisters Christina Bruce, Mary Bruce and daughter Marjorie Bruce, and Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow, ending their 8-year imprisonment in England.

The defeat of the English opened up the north of England to Scottish raids [11] and allowed the Scottish invasion of Ireland. [28] These finally led, after the failure of the Declaration of Arbroath to secure diplomatic recognition of Scotland's independence by the Pope, to the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton in 1328. [28] Under the treaty the English crown recognised the full independence of the Kingdom of Scotland, and acknowledged Robert the Bruce, and his heirs and successors, as the rightful rulers. [ citation needed ]

The following are the notable casualties and captives of the battle. [36]


Barbour and Morrill

Dr. E.H. Barbour arrived in the fall of 1891, bringing with him not only a doctorate degree from Yale, but also an extensive collection of minerals, sediment samples, and vertebrate fossils from his summer field trip to northwestern Nebraska. He financed this expedition from his own finances the summer before he was officially hired on as a faculty member at UNL, and brought his findings with him.

Barbour was hired as a professor of geology, as well as to act as the Nebraska state geologist. In addition to these duties, the complimentory honor of director of the Nebraska State Museum was bequeathed to him as well. Barbour took on these responsibilities and began enthusiastically adding to the museum, even funding his own expeditions for fossils in 1891 and 1892. In 1893, John Morrill, the head of the Nebraska Board of Regents at the time, heard about Barbour's lack of funding and offered to fund several expeditions a year out of his own expenses until 1902. Due to this generous offer, the collection grew exponentially, and began featuring larger vertebrate fossils for the first time.

As the collection grew, the top two floors in Nebraska Hall quickly became crowded with artifacts. Within a few years, Barbour was already working to try to secure funding for the construction of a separate museum building, with enough room for the current collection as well as future additions.


Barbour Silver Company design catalogues and historical information

Above, advertisement in Jewelers’ Circular on 8 February 1893. For more information, see the entry below.

"BARBOUR SILVER CO., Hartford and Meriden, Conn.
Organized in 1892 in Hartford, Connecticut. this company itself was the product of a consolidation of I. J. Steane & Co., Barbour Hobson Co., and Barbour Bros. Co. Barbour made sterling hollowware and fine quality silverplated hollowware, specializing in heavily chased and engraved pieces plated on a nickel silver base. From 1921 to 1931, the company also made an extensive line of ’Dutch’ silver, plated on copper. In 1921, Barbour Sterling was transferred to the Wilcox & Evertsen plant. The plant closed in 1931 and the trademark was retired from active use."

&mdash Edmund P. Hogan in An American heritage: A book about the International Silver Company (1977), p. 159. (See entry below.)

Barbour Silver Company - design catalogues and historical information (by year)

Barbour Silver Co. predecessors: Albany Silver Plate Co. Barbour Bros. Co., Barbour Hobson Co. Cromwell Plate Co. Hartford Silver Plate Co. I. J. Steane & Co. Steane, Son & Hall Taunton Silver Plate Co. (definitely listing, in process).

Material status: = online
= link to more info
= completely offline

Various newspapers, magazines and other sources

(c. 1881-). Various newspapers, magazines and other sources - search engines. (Updated 22 July 2020. C01255 D01213 H01535 L01816).

1882 - patent - burnishing-machine

Newell S. Valentine, assignor to Hartford Silver Plate Co. [predecessor of Barbour Silver Co.] (12 September 1882 filed 1 July 1882). Letters patent no. 264,423: Burnishing-machine. (Viewed 18 July 2020. L01653).

1884 - advertisement

Hartford Silver Plate Co. [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor]. (c. January & February 1884). Advertisement: "The Hartford Silver Plate Co. . Salesrooms at Hartford, Conn., 52 Park Place, N. Y,, 537 Market St., San Francisco ." [with two illustrations]. The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. LXIX. (Viewed 21 October 2018. B01172).

1885 - news mention

(September 1885). Trade gossip [including mention of Hartford Silver Plate Co. (Barbour Silver Co. predecessor). The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 260. (Viewed 13 May 2020. H01508).

"The Hartford Silver Plate Company has recently patented a new form of water cooler which they have christened ’the Arctic.’ . " (Excerpt from above.)

1885 - news mention

(October 1885). Trade gossip [including a paragraph on Hartford Silver Plate Co. (Barbour Silver Co. predecessor)]. The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 296. (Viewed 21 October 2018. C00299-300).

"The Hartford Silver Plate Company [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor] have prepared and now offer some new and beautiful designs in their quadruple plated hollow ware. They also present for the inspection of buyers a full line of plated flat ware. " (Excerpt in full from above.)

1885 - patent - fluid-cooler

Newell S. Valentine, assignor to Hartford Silver Plate Co. [predecessor of Barbour Silver Co.] (14 July 1885 filed 28 February 1885). Letters patent no. 322,081: Fluid-cooler. (Viewed 18 July 2020. L01652).

1886 articles

1886 - news mention

(July 1886). Trade gossip [including mention of the Hartford Silver Plate Co. (Barbour Silver Co. predecessor) opening an office in St. Louis.] The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 202. (Viewed 21 October 2018. L00723).

1886 - news mention

(August 1886). Trade gossip [with mention that Hartford Silver Plate Co. (Barbour Silver Co. predecessor) claims to have discovered a process to reduce tarnish.] The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 241, col. 2. (Viewed 18 October 2020. F01534).

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1890 - two advertisements

A. & J. Plaut, Cincinnati, OH. (6 & 7 September 1890). Advertisement: "Fall offering! . Silver-Plated Table Ware. Barbour Bros. [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor] . " [with no illustrations]. Cincinnati Enquirer. (Viewed 21 June 2019. C00995-96).

1892 articles

1892 - news mention

(1 June 1892). Connecticut concerns that have applied for space at Chicago [World’s Fair]. [Mention of Barbour Bros. & Co.] The Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 12. (Viewed 28 August 2018. H00366-67).

1892 - news mention

(15 June 1892). The Barbour Silver Co. of Hartford [paragraph announcement]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 28. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02957-58).

Hartford, Conn., June 10 &mdash The Barbour Silver Co. has been organized in this city to buy, sell and deal in merchandise made of silver, britannia or other metal, glass or other material. The capital is $100,000 in 100[0] shares of $100 each, $20,000 of which has been paid in cash and $80,000 in property.

The incorporators are I. J. Steane, 501 shares S. L. Barbour, 300, and J. L. Dalgleish, 199, all of Hartford. (Full excerpt from above.)

1892 - patent - handle

Charles H. Maschmeyer, assignor to Hartford Silver Plate Co. [predecessor of Barbour Silver Co.]. (8 November 1892 filed 13 April 1892). Letters patent no. 485,846 serial no. 429,006: Handle. (Viewed 18 July 2020. L01651).

C. 1890s - design catalogue

Barbour Silver Company. (c. 1890s). Sterling silver and silver plate: in hallow ware only. 116 pp. (Viewed 17 August 2018. L00554).

C. 1890s - design catalogue

Barbour Silver Company. (c. 1890s). Catalogue C - Sterling silver and silver plate in holloware only. 92 pp. (Viewed 27 July 2018. C00186-03).

1893 - directory listing

(1893). "Barbour Silver Co." listing. In The New England business directory and gazetteer, [p. 1546 (Silver Plated Ware Manufs.)]. (Sampson & Murdock Company: Boston, MA). (Viewed 5 May 2020. H01348-49).

1893 - directory listing

(1893). "Hartford Silver Plate Co." (Barbour Silver Co. predecessor) listing. In The New England business directory and gazetteer, [pp. 1546 (Silver Plated Ware Manufs.) 1816 (Manufacturing Companies)]. (Sampson, Murdock & Co.: Boston, MA). (Viewed 13 May 2020. H01348-49 H01509).

1893 - spotlighted news brief

(2 August 1893). The Hartford Silver Plate Co. absorbed by the Barbour Silver Co. Jewelers’ Circular, p. 10, col. 2. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01654).

1893 - spotlighted news brief

(9 August 1893). The Barbour Silver Co.’s purchase. Jewelers’ Circular, p. 8. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01655).

1893 articles

1893 - news mention

(1 February 1893). Trade gossip [with mention: ". [Barbour Silver Co.] will place on the market the coming season a number of original and striking designs. " Jewelers’ Circular, p. 32, col. 1. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01652).

1893 - news mention

(8 February 1893). Chicago [with mention: "At the Chicago office of the Barbour Silver Co., 122 Wabash Ave., the trade will find a complete line of samples. "]. Jewelers’ Circular, p. 42, col. 2. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01651).

1893 - news mention

(13 September 1893). St. Louis (with mention: "S. Barbour. has been here on a visit to the Hartford Silver [Plate] Co’s establishment on 4th St. . ") Jewelers’ Circular, p. 32. (Viewed 3 June 2020. H01962).

1893 - news mention

(18 October 1893). Connecticut [with mention: "Hartford city authorities have granted a permit to the Barbour Silver Co. to build a brick structure of four stories on the south side of Temple St."] Jewelers’ Circular and Horological Review, p. 35, col. 2. (Viewed 2 June 2020. H01961).

1893 - advertisement

Barbour Silver Co. ( 8 February 1893). Advertisement: ". Sterling silver and silver plated hollow ware. 122 Wabash Avenue, Chicago Factories: Hartford, Conn." [with illustration of coffee set with tray]. Jewelers’ Circular, p. 5. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01653).

1894 articles

1894 - article mention

(15 May 1894). New company formed ["The Biggins, Rodgers company"]. Meriden Daily Republican, p. 7, col. 4. (Viewed 5 February 2021. R00515).

". Biggins, Rogers company . President&mdash Henry E. Biggins Treasurer&mdash Frank L. Rodgers Secretary&mdash Henry B. Hall. The company are to manufacture sterling silver, silver plated and metal goods. The factory has been completed and the machinery of the Hartford Silver Plate company [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor] has been purchased and will be put in place at once. The company mean to have their factory running by July first. Mr. Hall for some years was connected with R. Wallace and Son’s and at one time was manager and sale[s]man of the Bristol Brass and Clock Company. Mr. Hall has the reputation of being one of the most successful salesmen on the road and will be of great value to the new company. " (Excerpt from above.)

1894 - news mention

(21 August 1894). Wallingford [with mention of Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. Hartford Silver Plate Co. and Biggins-Rodgers Co.]. Daily Morning Journal Courier (New Haven, CT), p. 5, col. 5. (Viewed 6 February 2021. R01019).

"Eugene Hotchkiss, formerly employed at Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co.’s and later at the Hartford Silver Plate company [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor], will be the plater at the Biggins & Rodgers Co.’s new factory." (Excerpt from above.)

1895 - news mention

(23 January 1895). Chicago notes: ". H. D. Cretcher, formerly for five years salesman for the Hartford Silver Plate Co. [Barbour Silver Co. predecessor] . will represent the Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. and the Manhattan Silver Plate Co., on the road in Michigan and Wisconsin. " Jewelers’ Circular (Western Supplement), p. 28. (Viewed 10 October 2020. F01483).

C. 1895 - design catalogue

Barbour Silver Company. (c. 1895). Catalogue D - Sterling silver and high grade silver plates ware in holloware only. 92 pp. (Viewed 27 July 2018. C00186-04).

C. 1895 - design catalogue supplement

Barbour Silver Company. (c. 1895). Supplement to catalogue D - high grade electro silver plated ware and sterling silver. 18 pp. (Viewed 27 July 2018. C00186-05).

1897 advertisements

1897 - advertisement

G. Fox & Co., Hartford, CT. (22 June 1897). Advertisement: "Plated ware, Such makes as Meriden Britannia, Derby Silver Co., Rogers & Hamilton, and Barbour Silver Plate Co. . Soup ladles, Berry Spoons, Tomato Servers, Oyster Sets, Salad Forks, Fish Forks. " [with no illustrations]. Hartford Courant, p. 5. (Viewed 19 October 2018. D00346).

1897 - text-based advertisement

Gimbel Brothers, Philadelphia, PA. (11 October 1897). Advertisement: ". Silverware and Cutlery. Barbour Silver Co. . We sell their goods. " [with no illustrations]. Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), p. 3, col. 3. (Viewed 28 August 2020. E01220).

C. 1897 - design catalogue page excerpt

Unidentified company. (c. 1897). [Catalogue page showing three Barbour Silver Co. trinket boxes illustrated]. [Company description at top of page: "The leading jobber in all reliable makes of American cases and movements", (p. 141 or 441).] Collectors Weekly website. (Viewed 23 May 2020. H01658).

C. 1897 - historical information

Davis, William T. (Ed.) (c. 1897). On "Barbour Silver Co.", (p. 833). In The New England states, their constitutional, judicial, educational, commercial, professional and industrial history, vol. 2. Boston: D. H. Hurd & Co. (Viewed 9 June 2017. A02626 A02632.)

1898 advertisements

1898 - advertisement

Wm. Hengerer Co., Buffalo, NY. (4 October 1898). Advertisement: ". Tea set, 5 pieces, best quadruple plate&mdash Barbour Silver Co.’s goods&mdash fluted Colonial shape. " [with no illustrations]. Buffalo Evening News (New York), p. 2, cols. 7-8. (Viewed 12 October 2018. B00984).

1898 - advertisement

Wm. Hengerer Co., Buffalo, NY. (31 October 1898). Advertisement: ". High Grade Silverware. Tea Set&mdash 5 pieces. Barbour Silver Co. . " Buffalo Courier (New York), p. 4, cols. 5-7. (Viewed 12 October 2018. B00985).

C. 1898 - design catalogue

Barbour Silver Company. (c. 1898). Catalogue E - Sterling silver and highest grade silver plated ware in hollow ware only. 110 pp. (Viewed 27 July 2018. C00186-06).

The Barbour Silver Company became part of the International Silver Company in 1898. After this date, it is assumed that any design patents utilized by the Barbour Silver Company division or brand were assigned to the International Silver Company. (See the ISC historical documentation page).

1899 articles

1899 - article

(19 June 1899). Barbour silver works Plant will go to Meriden after January 1. Hartford Courant, p. 8. (Viewed 19 October 2018. D00317).

". The Barbour Silver Company began business in this city [Hartford] about ten years ago coming from New York, where Mr. Barbour had made a fine reputation for the goods manufactured. The company manufactures all kinds of hollow ware in silver plated goods, German silver and sterling silver, and has been very prosporous. . The buildings owned and occupied by the company on Market Street are quite extensive and include the old theater. The Barbour Silver Company some years ago absorbed the Hartford Silver Plate Company. " (Excerpt from above.)

1899 - news mention

(13 October 1899). The new Allyn House [hotel, Asylum Street, Hartford]: Elegant, homelike appointments throughout (with mention: ". the silverware, in special design, by the Barbour Silver Company [/ International Silver Company]. ") Hartford Courant, p. 5. (Viewed 26 December 2018. D00323).

1899 - news mention

(1 November 1899). Connecticut [news briefs]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 43. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967-68).

After Jan 1, the Barbour Silver Co., Hartford, who are absorbed in the International Silver Co., will occupy the old Meriden Silver Plate Co. factory, Meriden. The Barbour Silver Co. have been employing from 200 to 300 persons. (Full excerpt from above.)

1899 - news mention

(22 November 1899). Connecticut [news briefs, mentions International Silver Co., Barbour Silver Co., and Meriden Silver Plate Co.]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 47. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02070).

1899 - news mention

(29 November 1899). The removal of Barbour Silver Co. to Meriden [mentions International Silver Co., Barbour Silver Co., and Meriden Silver Plate Co.]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 17. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02071).

1899 - news mention

(6 December 1899). Connecticut [news briefs, mentions International Silver Co., Barbour Silver Co., and Meriden Silver Plate Co.]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 43. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02072).

1899 - article

(25 December 1899). Going to Meriden [one-paragraph article with mention of Barbour Silver Company and Meriden Silver Plate Company (/International Silver Co.)]. Hartford Courant, p. 9. (Viewed 19 October 2018. D00318).

"The plant of the Barbour Silver Company. is being transferred from [Hartford] to Meriden. It will occupy the building on Cross street, formerly used by the cut glass department of the old Meriden Silver Plate Company. " (Excerpt from above.)

1899 advertisements

1899 - classified advertisement, auction

W. Ballantyne, Auctioneer, presumably Boston, MA. (19 June 1899). Classified advertisement: "Wednesday, June 21, 1000 pieces silver-plated ware, manufactured by Barbour Silver Co., Hartford Silver [Plate] Co., etc. . " Boston Globe (Massachusetts), p. 11, col. 7. (Viewed 21 October 2020. F01565).

1899 - two advertisements

International Silver Company. (22 November 1899 20 December 1899). Advertisement: "International Silver Co., Successor to the Holmes & Edwards Silver Co. and The Barbour Silver Co. . St. Louis Salesrooms: Holland Building, 209-211-213 North Seventh St., St Louis, MO." Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02966-67 AAA02969).

1899 - two advertisements

Walbridge’s, Buffalo, NY. (December 1899). Advertisement: "Silverware. Barbour Silver Co. [/ International Silver Co.] . " [without relevant illustrations]. Buffalo Evening News (New York). (Viewed 13 October 2018. B001011-14).

  • Online - fultonhistory.com. (Search the archive and scroll down for the link: for 11 December 1899, page unknown, cols. 6-8, search: "Buffalo NY Evening News 1899 - 7477" for 14 December 1899, p. 4, cols. 6-8, search "Buffalo NY Evening News 1899 - 7489").

1899 - advertisement

Walbridge’s, Buffalo, NY. (13 December 1899). Advertisement: ". The Best of Plated Ware. Barbour Silver Co.’s [/ International Silver Co.] Solid Nickel, Silver or Hard Metal Tea Sets. " Buffalo Evening News (New York), p. 4, cols. 5-8. (Viewed 13 October 2018. B01015-16).

1899 - advertisement

Walbridge & Co., Buffalo, NY. (14 December 1899). Advertisement: ". The finest Christmas Goods. The Best of Plated Ware. Barbour Silver Co. [/ International Silver Co.] . " [no illustrations]. Buffalo Courier (New York), p. 3, cols. 4-7. (Viewed 13 October 2018. B00990-91).

1900 articles

1900 - news mention

(3 January 1900). Connecticut [news briefs, mentions International Silver Co., Barbour Silver Co., and Meriden Silver Plate Co.]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 33. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02073).

1900 - news mention

(3 January 1900). Chicago notes [news brief, talks about International Silver Co. consolidation and salesrooms effects in Chicago mentions Barbour Silver Co., Holmes & Edwards Silver Co., Manhattan Silver Plate Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Rogers & Hamilton Co., Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 34. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02074).

1900 - news mention

(17 January 1900). Connecticut [news briefs, mentions Barbour Silver Co. and Meriden Silver Plate Co., which refers to the International Silver Co.]. Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, p. 27. (Viewed 7 May 2018. AAA02967 AAA02075).

1900 - news mention

(5 February 1900). [No article heading listing the "Barber [sic] Silver Company" as "Factory A" of the International Silver Company Barbour has "gone out of their old place of business and merged into the Meriden branch. "]. The Daily Morning Journal and Courier (New Haven, CT), p. 1, col. 7. (Viewed 29 September 2018. B00566-67).

1900 advertisements

1900 - advertisement

S. E. Olson, Co., Minneapolis, MN. (5 October 1900). Advertisement: ". The opening of our grand Jewelry, Silverware and Bric-a-Brac Department. Barbour Silver Co. [/ International Silver Co.] . " [with no product illustrations]. Minneapolis Tribune / Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minnesota), p. 5, cols. 4-7. (Viewed 20 January 2021. D01720).

1900 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (22 November 1900). Advertisement: ". Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 7, col. 6. (Viewed 26 June 2020. F01227).

1901 advertisements

1901 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (7 March 1901). Advertisement: ". Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 7, col. 6. (Viewed 27 June 2020. F01260).

1901 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (25 July 1901). Advertisement: ". Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 7, col. 4. (Viewed 24 November 2020. F01892).

1901 - two advertisements

International Silver Co. (15 & 22 August 1901). Advertisements: . Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican. F01650 F01652).

1901 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (5 September 1901). Advertisement: ". Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 6. (Viewed 28 June 2020. F01261).

1901 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (12 December 1901). Advertisement: ". Makers of Gold and Silver Plate Rich Cut Glass, Etc. Successor to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden Silver Plate Co., Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others . General Offices, Meriden, Conn. Branches: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Hamilton, Ont." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 2 or 3, col. 7. (Viewed 24 June 2020. L01484).

1902 - article mention

(4 September 1902). Alterations on [International] Silver Co.’s various shops (with mention of Barbour Silver Co., "Factory E" [Meriden Britannia Co.], "Wallingford" [Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co.], Watrous Manufacturing Co., and William Rogers Mfg. Co.). Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 2, col. 1. (Viewed 3 July 2020. F01352-53).

1902 advertisements

1902 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (6 March 1902). Advertisement: "International Silver Co., Silversmiths, Successor to Barbour Silver Co. Meriden Britannia Co. Meriden Silver Plate Co. Wilcox Silver Plate Co. Meriden Cut Glass Co., and others. " Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, column 6. (Viewed 9 September 2017. G00238).

1902 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (4 September 1902). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. Also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Hartford [presumably Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], Lyons, N.Y. [presumably Manhattan Silver Plate Co.] and Canada [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 6. (Viewed 28 June 2020. F01266).

1902 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (11 December 1902). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. Also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Hartford [presumably Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], Lyons, N.Y. [presumably Manhattan Silver Plate Co.] and Canada [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 6. (Viewed 2 July 2020. F01301).

1902 or 1903 - advertisement

Geo. H. Smith, Fairfield, CT. (11 December 1902 or 1903). Advertisement: "Christmas novelties. Barbour Silver Company [/ International Silver Co.] . " [with no illustration]. The Chronicle (Southport, CT), page unknown, cols. 5-6. (Viewed 6 June 2019. B00987).

1903 advertisements

1903 - news brief

(January 1903). Untitled news brief mentioning Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. [/ International Silver Company], Barbour Silver Co. [/ISC]. House Furnishing Review, p. 32, col. 1. (Viewed 28 July 2020. G01137).

1903 - two advertisements

International Silver Company. (January-February 1903). Advertisements: "Makers of Wares of Sterling and Silver Plate. [Factories:] The Barbour Silver Co., The Holmes & Edwards Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., The Meriden Silver Plate Co., Rogers & Brother, Wilcox Silver Plate Co., The Meriden Cut Glass Co., The Derby Silver Co., Manhattan Silver Plate Co., The Forbes Silver Co., The Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co., The Rogers & Hamilton Co. Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co., The Watrous Mfg. Co." House Furnishing Review. (Viewed 7 October 2017. G01135 G01151.)

1903 - four advertisements

International Silver Company. (March-June 1903). Advertisements: ". Makers of Wares in Sterling and Silver Plate. [Factories:] The Barbour Silver Co., The Holmes & Edwards Silver Co., Meriden Britannia Co., The Meriden Silver Plate Co., Rogers & Brother, Wilcox Silver Plate Co., The Meriden Cut Glass Co., The Derby Silver Co., The Forbes Silver Co., The Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co., The Rogers & Hamilton Co. Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co., The Watrous Mfg. Co., Middletown Plate Co. . " House Furnishing Review. (Viewed 7 October 2017. G01154 G01159 .)

1903 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (10 December 1903). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’H,’ formerly Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co., ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. Also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], Lyons, N.Y. [presumably Manhattan Silver Plate Co.] and Canada [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 6. (Viewed 2 July 2020. F01302).

1904 advertisements

1904 - classified advertisement

Barbour Silver Co. / International Silver Co. (17 April 1904). Classified advertisement: "Wanted&mdash First class ornamental engravers on silverware. State past experience and apply to Barbour Silver Co., Meriden, Conn." New York Herald, p. 20, col. 5. (Viewed 30 April 2020. H01272-73).

1904 - advertisement

Walbridge’s, Buffalo, NY. (9 October 1904). Advertisement: ". Silver plated tea sets. Barbour Silver Co. [/ International Silver Co.] . " [with no specified illustrations]. The Buffalo Courier (New York), p. 45, cols. 4-7. (Viewed 12 October 2018. B00988).

1905 advertisements

1905 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (4 October 1905). Advertisement: "Rich American cut glass. " [including listing of Barbour Silver Co. with illustration of product design]. The Jewelers’ Circular &mdash Weekly, p. 27. (Viewed 2 September 2018. H00386.)

1905 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (25 October 1905). Advertisement [including listing of Barbour Silver Co. with product illustration]. The Jewelers’ Circular &mdash Weekly, p. 33. (Viewed 2 September 2018. H00399).

1905 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (1 November 1905). Advertisement: "Rich American cut glass. " [including listing of Barbour Silver Co. with product illustration]. The Jewelers’ Circular &mdash Weekly, p. 31. (Viewed 2 September 2018. D00253).

1905 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (8 November 1905). Advertisement: ". Many new and seasonable goods. " [includes listing of Barbour Silver Company no illustration]. The Jewelers’ Circular &mdash Weekly, p. 37. (Viewed 2 September 2018. D00257).

1906 advertisements

1906 - advertisement

Walbridge & Co., presumably Buffalo, NY. (20 May 1906). Advertisement: ". Special Sale of Tea Sets. Barbour Silver Co. [/ International Silver Co.] 5-piece Tea Set. [tea set] heavily plated on nickel silver" [with no illustration]. The Buffalo Courier (New York), page number unknown. (Viewed 15 June 2019. F00950-51).

1906 - advertisement

International Silver Company. (14 June 1906). Advertisement: ". Makers of Wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass, Salesrooms[:] Meriden, New York, Chicago, San Francisco. Barbour Silver Co." [with no illustrations]. Meriden Morning Record, p. 7, col. 1. (Viewed 23 October 2018. B01192).

1907 - article mention

(6 May 1907). Hartford the hub of the wheel of commerce of Connecticut ("Barbour Silver Company" [/ International Silver Co.] mention). New York Herald, unknown page number. (Viewed 23 April 2020. C01210).

1907 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (10 December 1907). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F,’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’H,’ formerly Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], and Canada" [with no illustrations]. Meriden Morning Record, p. 9, col. 1. (Viewed 29 June 2020. F01272).

1908 - news mention

(13 October 1908). A golden wedding [with mention of ". a beautiful bowl of solid silver, gold lined, 12 inches in diameter and 5 inches high. It was a special order made by the Barbour Silver Co. [/International Silver Co.], of Meriden, Conn. . " The Columbia Republican (Hudson, New York), p. 4, col. 7. (Viewed 13 October 2018. B00989).

1908 advertisements

1908 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (2 April 1908). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F,’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’H,’ formerly Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], and Canada" [with no illustrations]. Meriden Morning Record, p. 7, col. 1. (Viewed 2 July 2020. F01303).

1908 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (11 June 1908). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F,’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’H,’ formerly Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], and Canada" [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 1. (Viewed 22 October 2020. F01625).

1908 - advertisement

International Silver Co. (13 August 1908). Advertisement: ". Makers of wares in Sterling Silver, Gold and Silver Plate and Rich Cut Glass. Salesrooms: Meriden, New York, Chicago, Hamilton, Ontario Factories: ’A,’ formerly Barbour Silver Co., ’E,’ formerly Meriden Britannia Co., ’F,’ formerly Meriden Silver Plate Co., ’H,’ formerly Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. ’N,’ formerly Wilcox Silver Plate Co. also Bridgeport [presumably Holmes & Edwards], Derby [presumably Derby Silver Co.], Norwich [presumably Norwich Cutlery], Waterbury [presumably Rogers & Brother and Rogers & Hamilton], Wallingford [presumably Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. and Watrous Manufacturing Co.], and Canada" [with no illustrations]. Meriden Weekly Republican, p. 3, col. 1. (Viewed 10 November 2020. F01866).


Barton Barbour

Professor Barton H. Barbour received his Ph.D from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, in 1993. He has worked at Boise State University since 2001, and teaches courses in early American history, including classes in Colonial America, Native American history and US Indian Policy, and North American Exploration.

Dr. Barbour worked for several years in museums and cultural institutions administered by local, state, and federal agencies. From 1998 to 2001 Barbour worked as a research historian with the National Park Service at Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has taught at the University of New Mexico and the Albuquerque Technical-Vocational Institute, at Bishop’s University in Québec, Canada, and he was a visiting professor at Boise State University in 1994-95.

Barton Barbour has published five books and numerous articles that deal with the North American fur trade and its affects on various “frontiers” of society, ethnicity, business, law and politics. Barbour’s 2001 book, Fort Union and the Upper Missouri Fur Trade (University of Oklahoma Press) was a finalist for a Western Writers of America SPUR Award (2002) and received an honor award from the Denver Public Library’s Caroline Bancroft Trust Award for Western History books (2003). Dr. Barbour’s most recent book is a biography of a famed fur trader and explorer titled Jedediah Smith: No Ordinary Mountain Man (University of Oklahoma Press, 2009). In 2010 Dr. Barbour was named a a recipient of Boise State’s first Arts & Humanities Fellowship (2010-2011).

Phone: (208)426-1255
Email: [email protected]

To read more about Dr. Barbour, his work or his research, click on his Scholarworks page below:
Scholarworks


History

In 1914, Snelling Speedway sat where the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) operates today. The auto-racing venue was unsuccessful, and the Minneapolis Aero Club acquired the property for loftier purposes. The first hangar, a wooden structure, was constructed in 1920 to accommodate airmail service, and the 160-acre property became known as Speedway Field. In 1923, the airport was renamed Wold-Chamberlain Field in honor of two local pilots, Ernest Wold and Cyrus Chamberlain, who lost their lives in combat during World War I.

The airport soon became home to Northwest Airways, which in 1926 won the government's airmail contract and acquired the airport's only hangar.

Progress

In its 80-year history, MSP has undergone numerous changes, from its first landing strip in 1920, to its first passenger service in 1929 and massive expansion efforts in the early 1960s, including construction of the Lindbergh Terminal (now Terminal 1), a maintenance base and Northwest Airlines' world headquarters.

With the arrival of international service, MSP underwent its final name change in 1948, becoming Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

In 1958, ground breaking ceremonies were held for the terminal, which opened to the public in 1962. It was designed to serve four million passengers a year by 1975. Passenger growth far exceeded projections, however, with more than 4.1 million people using the airport by 1967.

Passenger growth continued to exceed expectations in the 1970s and 1980s. To address this growth, the Minnesota legislature passed the Metropolitan Airport Planning Act in 1989, establishing the Dual Track Airport Planning Process. Conducted by the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) and the Metropolitan Council, the seven-year planning process explored options for providing needed air service capacity and facilities for the region.

Specifically, competing plans were developed to either expand MSP at its present site or build a new airport elsewhere.

The Next Generation

Upon completion of the study in 1996, the Minnesota Legislature directed the MAC to implement the MSP 2010 Long-Term Comprehensive Plan, providing for $3.1 billion in airport improvements at the current site.

Virtually every aspect of MSP has been transformed in the years since, with a major expansion of Terminal 1, a new Terminal 2, expanded roadways and parking, two automated airport trams, and development of a light-rail system connecting both MSP terminals to the Mall of America and the downtowns of Minneapolis and St. Paul.

With the final major aspect of the 2010 program, a new fourth runway, having opened in October 2005, the MAC is now implementing improvements identified through its 2030 Long-Term Comprehensive Plan.


The Barbour Estate

Casa Feliz, or "Happy House" in Spanish, is the signature residential work of noted architect James Gamble Rogers II. Initially known as the Barbour Estate, this Andalusian-style masonry farmhouse has significantly influenced the architectural and cultural aspects of this community. In 1932, when Massachusetts industrialist Robert Bruce Barbour commissioned Rogers to design a home on the shore of Lake Osceola, the young architect described it as a "dream come true." Barbour offered Rogers unheard-of freedom for an architect "Design it any way you like. If I don't like it, I'll sell it." Thus, perhaps more than any of Rogers' buildings, Casa Feliz bears his imprimatur. Built during the Great Depression for a cost of $28,000, the house was Rogers' only project at the time. He set up his drawing board on site, rolling up his shirt sleeves to help with the carpentry and masonry.

Barbour loved the resulting house, as did the Winter Park community which cherished the home as the crown jewel in this "City of Homes" over the next 70 years. Community members rallied around the house in the year 2000, when the property faced the threat of demolition. More than $1.2 million was raised in private donations to save and restore the home. The first step was to move the house across Interlachen Avenue to its present location on the Winter Park Golf Course. The event became a media spectacle, as the 750 ton behemoth, balanced on 20 pneumatically leveled dollies, rode the 300 yards to its new home. Once the house was positioned in its new location, restoration began. Highly skilled craftsmen and artisans worked to restore the house to its original design. Copies of Rogers' original drawings and interior photographs taken in the 1930s by Harold Haliday Costain were used to ensure authenticity.

Today, Casa serves the community as a historic home museum and rental location for private parties, weddings, and business events. Come visit during our public open houses--each Sunday from 12-3, and Tuesday and Thursday from 10-12. Private tours of 10 or more guests can be arranged by calling 407.628.8200.


THE MANY FACES OF MODERN WAXED COTTON

Nowadays the terms “oilcloth” and “waxed cotton” are sometimes used interchangeably to describe the same material, in spite of their real and historic differences. Our partners at Barbour make outerwear of waxed cotton manufactured to different specifications depending on its anticipated use:

Sylkoil is an “unshorn” wax where the cotton comes straight from the loom while it’s slightly fluffy and is then dyed and waxed. The natural imperfections of the weave are reflected in the rich variations of color and finish. Over time, this fabric softens into a lovely, slightly peachy looking cotton between waxes.

Thornproof is a lustrous wax with a deep color and even touch. The cotton is calendered between rollers and then dyed. The resulting finish is smooth cotton which we term Thornproof because it is extremely resistant to snags and pulls from spiky plants such as brambles and hawthorn.

In spite of waxed cotton’s utility and appeal, modern polymers (GORE-TEX® is an example) have threatened its extinction in recent years. And it is really no wonder: they’re more practical and require less maintenance.

This begs the question, why choose a Barbour waxed cotton jacket? You could as easily ask why a book holds sway over a tablet reader, a mechanical watch over a digital one, or wood over laminate, and the answer would be the same: because it possesses a depth of character its modern counterpart lacks. When you wear a Barbour jacket, you are wearing a piece of history.

And in the end, waxed cotton has rallied: while the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries may have seen its widest use in the marine industries, the classic waxed cotton jacket has made a comeback as essential outerwear for the discriminating country sportsman, fashion maven, and urbanite alike. It is a garment that develops patina with age, each mark a reminder of a page in a chapter, or a chapter in a story.

For many of us the waxed cotton jacket never went out of style. As stewards of a living garment—one that will likely enjoy use by multiple generations—we proudly wear this wardrobe beacon of our forebears.


The Barbour story began in 1894 in the Market Place in South Shields, England. Today the 5th generation family owned business remains in the read, with Barbour’s headquarters located in Simonside, South Shields. Although it sources products from around the globe, Barbour’s classic wax jackets are still manufactured by hand in the factory in Simonside and each year over 100,000 jackets are processed via the central, subsidiary and local customer service operations.

In 2004, Barbour began to work with Lord James Percy, in the design and marketing of its flagship shooting clothing range—the Northumberland range. Technically advanced and highly acclaimed in 2005, the Northumberland Range won the Shooting Industry Award for best clothing product, and the Linhope 3-in-1 won the Shooting Industry Award for best clothing product, 2008. Percy was also involved, alongside Vice Chairman Helen Barbour, in designing the new Barbour Sporting collection launched for Autumn Winter 2011.

Barbour now has 11 of its own retail shops in the UK, and a presence in over 40 countries worldwide including the United States, Germany, Holland, Austria, France, Italy, Spain, Argentina, New Zealand and Japan.

There are now over 2,000 products across the two seasons and the collections now cater for Men, Ladies and Children. Broadening out from its countrywear roots, today the heritage and lifestyle clothing brand produces clothing that is designed for a full lifestyle wardrobe. As well as jackets and coats, the Barbour wardrobe includes trousers, shirts, socks, knitwear and a range of accessories.

Nevertheless, in whichever area the company now operates, it remains true to its core values as a family business which espouses the unique values of the British Countryside and brings the qualities of wit, grit, and glamour to its beautifully functional clothing.

You can’t think of the classic Barbour wax cotton jacket’s provenance without a nod to England’s nineteenth-century marine industry. And if necessity is the mother of invention, hat tip to hardworking 15th-century mariners who slathered their sailcloth in fish oil. It’s the earliest known iteration of waxed cotton, the textile we admire so much these days for its weather-resistant functionality and timeless appeal. Resourceful ancient fishermen repurposed worn sailcloth as capes for themselves: the same properties to make their sails more efficient in dry weather, and lighter during storms, also kept their own backs dry.

A few centuries hence, “oilcloth” had morphed into a linseed oil-saturated Egyptian cotton, a flax plant derivative replacing the erstwhile smelly fish oil as a weather deterrent. A cheap alternative to leather, oilcloth could be used in many of the same applications. Problem was, linseed oil also made the material stiff in cold weather (and thus prone to cracking), and turned it yellow. It took a long time to dry once it was soaked, and it was toxic to some degree. Still, it served its purpose in the marine industry and remained more or less unchanged from the mid-nineteenth century until the 1930s.

It was then, over a period of two years and with the combined efforts of three companies, a new generation of proofed cottons emerged, now impregnated with paraffin-based wax instead of linseed oil. The result was a pliant and breathable, water-resistant cotton that did not yellow. Manufactured exclusively for outerwear, the newfangled waxed cotton in short order supplanted oilcloth as the preferred material for heavy-duty foul weather gear.

Although J. Barbour & Sons Ltd. did not invent waxed cotton, the company was an early champion and purveyor of it. Barbour called the first thick, waterproof waxed cotton fabric Oilskin, and its clothing line Beacon Brand. Oilskin outerwear answered the demands of sailors, fishermen, and river, dock, and shipyard workers in coastal South Shields, a busy port in the North East of England that is still home to Barbour. Waxed cotton also appealed to farmers and gamekeepers, and even found its way into Barbour motorcycling apparel as early as 1934, later popularized by American actor and cycling enthusiast Steve McQueen.

THE MANY FACES OF MODERN WAXED COTTON

Nowadays the terms “oilcloth” and “waxed cotton” are sometimes used interchangeably to describe the same material, in spite of their real and historic differences. Our partners at Barbour make outerwear of waxed cotton manufactured to different specifications depending on its anticipated use:

Sylkoil is an “unshorn” wax where the cotton comes straight from the loom while it’s slightly fluffy and is then dyed and waxed. The natural imperfections of the weave are reflected in the rich variations of color and finish. Over time, this fabric softens into a lovely, slightly peachy looking cotton between waxes.

Thornproof is a lustrous wax with a deep color and even touch. The cotton is calendered between rollers and then dyed. The resulting finish is smooth cotton which we term Thornproof because it is extremely resistant to snags and pulls from spiky plants such as brambles and hawthorn.

In spite of waxed cotton’s utility and appeal, modern polymers (GORE-TEX® is an example) have threatened its extinction in recent years. And it is really no wonder: they’re more practical and require less maintenance.

This begs the question, why choose a Barbour waxed cotton jacket? You could as easily ask why a book holds sway over a tablet reader, a mechanical watch over a digital one, or wood over laminate, and the answer would be the same: because it possesses a depth of character its modern counterpart lacks. When you wear a Barbour jacket, you are wearing a piece of history.

And in the end, waxed cotton has rallied: while the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries may have seen its widest use in the marine industries, the classic waxed cotton jacket has made a comeback as essential outerwear for the discriminating country sportsman, fashion maven, and urbanite alike. It is a garment that develops patina with age, each mark a reminder of a page in a chapter, or a chapter in a story.

For many of us the waxed cotton jacket never went out of style. As stewards of a living garment—one that will likely enjoy use by multiple generations—we proudly wear this wardrobe beacon of our forebears.


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