USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945

USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945

USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945

Here we see the Clemsen class destroyer USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea on 27 February 1945. The thick third smokestack was installed in 1937 when she was given experimental high pressure boilers, and retained after they were removed.


“And this we planned as a quiet day.” (USS Bugara Ship Log, 29 July 1945) USS Bugara (SS 331), one of 120 Balao-class submarines completed during the war, was launched on 2 July 1944 by Electric Boat Company in Groton, CT. Commander A.F. Schade was the first commanding officer. Her service from 21 February to

Victory at Sea is a new multi-year program from the Ocean Exploration Trust that will use various sea-going assets to explore, discover, and document iconic ships and aircraft lost during WWII. The goal of organizations like NHF during this 5-year campaign is to create compelling media content that can be used to engage new and


Historic Ships

The untimely end of the battleship Arizona solidified her place in American naval history. Countless generations of visitors still make the pilgrimage to her final resting place at Pearl Harbor. But while Arizona was destroyed in the first battle for the US in World War Two her overlooked sister, USS Pennsylvania, was not only at Pearl Harbor as well, but was the last major American ship to be damaged in that conflict.

Pennsylvania managed to escape the dubious honor of having been on Battleship Row during the attack on Pearl Harbor, but this fortunate set of circumstances also did not give her as much visibility in the public eye. For the older battleships present during the attack, Oklahoma and Arizona were destroyed and Nevada gained fame attempting to escape out of the harbor. And the newer "Big Five" battleships would be resurrected and some would be completely transformed to the point they were almost unrecognizable. But Pennsylvania, stuck in drydock, became best known for being in the background. In this case, the background for the wrecks of the destroyers Cassin and Downes.

Pennsylvania at Pearl Harbor. The marked guns would later be used in a memorial.

Pennsylvania
was the older of the two Pennsylvania-class battleships, laid down at Newport News on 27 October 1913. She escorted President Wilson to France just after World War One and then operated primarily in the Atlantic until 1931 when she was transferred to the Pacific.

She sustained relatively minor damage during the Pearl Harbor attack, then spent much of 1942 training and conducting patrols of the United States west coast. In early 1943 she was sent to the Aleutians to help force out the Japanese forces on Attu and Kiska. A crater from one of her 14" main guns can still be seen on Kiska.

Pennsylvania then went on to slug her way through numerous landings throughout the South and Central Pacific. Her closest opportunity to fame (excluding perhaps, her presence at Pearl Harbor) came at Surigao Strait in the early morning of 26 October 1944, when the Japanese attempted to force their way through into Leyte Gulf. In the last engagement between battleships, Pennsylvania was unable to get a fix on the Japanese fleet due to her older older fire control systems and her geometric position vis-a-vis the Japanese battle line. Her moment of glory had come and gone.


The Melting Thought

This is a post from my blog section “Profiles of True Heroes – Military and Law Enforcement“. I love to go cycling. As I started getting serious about it, I decided to name my routes after people – and who better to dedicate my routes to than the heroes in military and law enforcement?

After completing a route, I would select a hero I had heard about and then write about them. There are three types of people in this post: some gave their service for America and served in the armed forces. Some have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. And some protected the local community and died in the line of duty.

After their story, I included information about the route I dedicated to these heroes. I hope you can learn more about them and gain an understanding of what they have done for us.

US Navy Lieutenant Charles Ware – WWII

This route is dedicated to US Navy Lieutenant Charles Rollins Ware. Charles was an SBD Dauntless dive bomber pilot, USS Texas (BB-35), USS Dahlgren (DD-187), USS Enterprise (CV-6), Scouting Squadron 6.

Charles Rollins Ware was born on March 11, 1911 in Knoxville, Tennessee. He enlisted in the US Navy in 1929 and was appointed to the Naval Academy in 1930. Upon graduation in 1934, Ware served on the battleship the USS Texas (BB-35) and the destroyer USS Dahlgren (DD-187) until February 1940, when he entered flight training in Pensacola, FL.

Lieutenant Ware served as a Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bomber pilot with Scouting Squadron 6 based on the carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6). Ware and his division of six SBDs attacked and successfully sank the Japanese carrier Kaga on June 4, 1942 during the Battle of Midway.

During their return to the Enterprise they successfully fought off attacks by Japanese fighters but ran out of fuel and were forced to ditch their aircraft into the Pacific. Ware’s radioman, Petty Officer William Stambaugh, was the only crewman rescued and another crew was picked up by a Japanese destroyer and later executed when the enemy sailors learned of their fleet’s losses. Ware and the other SBD crewmen were reported missing in action.

Ware was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously for his heroism in pressing home his attack on the Japanese fleet in the face of fierce fighter opposition and fearsome anti-aircraft fire.

In 1945 the Gearing class destroyer USS Charles R. Ware (DD-865) was named in his honor. She served from 1945 to 1974 and participated in the Cuban blockade during the missile crisis and in the Vietnam War. In 1981, she was intentionally sunk during a target practice exercise and now lies at the bottom of the Caribbean Sea.

George DuVall, my former father in-law, was assigned to the Ware for 1 year and 3 months during the Vietnam War. He was the operator for the backup diesel engine.

Route

Distance: 38.21 miles

Duration: 3 hours, 30 minutes

Average Pace: 10.9 mph

Date: 02/24/2014

This is the longest route yet! I took the High Line Canal trail north from Colorado and Dartmouth. Everything was new to me, having never been on this route before. It was very flat and everything was paved. I got lost somewhat and had to backtrack a bit but I was soon back on the trail. I even passed a dude with one leg riding his bike! And it was an honor to dedicate this to a true hero, Charles R. Ware!


USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945 - History


Naval Support Facility Dahlgren is located in King George County, on both sides of Matchodoc Creek
Source: King George County

What is now the Naval Support Facility Dahlgren, part of Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), started in 1918 as the Naval Proving Ground for testing high-powered guns to be placed on US Navy ships. The facility's name honors Rear Admiral John Adolphus Dahlgren, "The Father of Naval Ordnance." He developed a smooth-bore, muzzle-loading gun with enough extra metal at the breech to make it look like the soda-water bottles of his time.


John Dahlgren, next to a Dahlgren Gun
Source: US Naval Institute, Naval History Blog, The Soda-Bottle Shaped Shell Guns

The shape and reinforcing metal reduced the risk of the weapon bursting and killing the sailors firing it, a danger which Dahlgren had experienced personally. In 1844, the "Peacemaker" gun had exploded during a demonstration of its power on the USS Princeton while cruising on the Potomac River. Among others, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Navy were killed. President John Tyler had chosen to stay below decks otherwise, he too might have been killed. 1


before John Dahlgren, large guns on naval ships were prone to exploding
Source: Library of Congress, Awful explosion of the "peace-maker" on board the U.S. Steam Frigate, Princeton, on Wednesday, 28th Feby. 1844

While at the Washington Navy Yard prior to the Civil War, John Dahlgren test-fired weapons down the Anacostia River. The US Navy moved its testing range to Annapolis in 1872, then to Indian Head (on the Maryland shoreline of the Potomac River) in 1890. The Naval Gun Factory was operational at the Washington Navy Yard by 1892, while the US Army established its "cannon factory" at Watervliet Arsenal on the Hudson River in New York.

The Indian Head site was problematic. Each test shot required evacuating the Marine barracks that was in the line of fire, and ensuring river traffic would not be at risk. In 1913, a part of a projectile landed just 300 feet away from the Mayflower, the presidential yacht which was carrying President Woodrow Wilson at that time.

The primary driver for a better test facility was the revolution in naval strategy created by the British, who launched the HMS Dreadnought in 1906. That battleship was the first with just big, long-range guns. It could destroy enemy ships before they got close enough to use their smaller-caliber guns or launch a torpedo. Other navies responded by building new ships with long-range guns as well.

The US Navy needed a range which would allow experimental testing of its own 14" and 16" guns. Indian Head had a 6,000-yard range, but by World War I some guns could fire as far as 40,000 yards.

In 1918, after the United States entered World War I, the Federal government expanded the Naval Proving Ground at Indian Head and purchased 1,300 acres along Matchodoc Creek. It offered a 90,000 yard "gun line" stretching from Matchodoc Creek to the mouth of the Potomac River.

The site was first called "Lower Station." The first test firing at Dalhgren was on October 16, 1918.


Source: Dahlgren Heritage Museum, The Navy Comes To Dahlgren: King George County before and after the Navy came to Dahlgren

To distinguish the Virginia station from Indian Head in Maryland, the facility was called the U.S. Naval Proving Ground. The Bureau of Ordnance also proposed to rename the existing post office at that site in King George County. However, "Dido" was not renamed "Matchodoc Creek" as planned because there was already such a post office in existence. The Navy then diverged from its standard practice of naming facilities after geographic locations, and instead decided to honor an individual. The Postal Service agreed to rename "Dido" to "Dahlgren" in 1919.


the first test at Dahlgren on October 16, 1918 involved a tractor-mounted gun
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command

Indian Head soon morphed into the Naval Powder Factory and focused on developing better propellants. It was responsible for the facility at Dahlgren until 1932. Today Naval Support Facility Indian Head is a center of excellence for multiple technologies related to missiles, energetic materials, and detonation science.

Land was aquired in King George County in 1918 for two reasons. Tt was near Indian Head, and the US Navy required a longer stretch of water than at Indian Head to test more-powerful powder charges in new gun barrels: 2

Prior to 1918, the Navy operated a proving ground at Indian Head, Maryland, but it became inadequate as advances in gun designs and ordnance made its range obsolete. During World War I, a range of 90,000 yards was sought by the Navy to prove its new battleship guns. The range was required to be over water but inside the territorial waters of the United States. The area from Machodoc Creek to Point Lookout on the Potomac River was selected because of its relative straight lines and accessibility. The climate and relative calm of the river were also factors as the Navy sought an ice and rapids free testing area.


Dahlgren tested munitions, gun barrels, and mechanisms for aiming weapons
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, Va. - NPG BUILDING HISTORY: Shell House, General view, and concrete storage platform


test-firing the 16" guns used on battleships in World War II rattled houses along the Potomac River
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Touring the Base

The site was isolated, but it offered the essential requirement of an unobstructed firing range down to the mouth of the Potomac River. Even St. Clements Island was acquired and retained by the US Navy, until transfer to the State of Maryland in 1962.

The base name was changed to the Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren in 1932, when it became the Navy's principal proving ground for every major naval gun and all ammunitions supplied to the fleet. The US Navy was being expanded by 20% in the Naval Construction Program initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, with passage of the Trammel-Vinson Act. Tests included the ability of armor plate on ships to withstand impacts of shells. 3


the museum at Dahlgren includes the results of a 1945 test on 19-inch thick plate, to assess its resistance to armor-piercing shells
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Touring the Base

The US Navy base at Dahlgren developed an early expertise in computers, since they were used for fire control of long-range guns and then missiles. The facility survived after World War II, then began to expand after the launch of Sputnik by the Soviet Union in 1958. During the Cold War, the US Navy used Dahlgren to develop the fire control and targeting software for the Fleet Ballistic Missile System.



Dahlgren was a pioneer in the use of computers in the 1940's
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Controlled sequence calculator and operator at the NORC console

The U.S. Naval Proving Ground was renamed the Naval Weapons Laboratory in 1959. The name was changed again to the Naval Surface Weapons Center in 1974, then the Naval Surface Warfare Center in 1987, and finally the Dahlgren Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center in 1992. In current military jargon, it is the Naval Support Facility Dahlgren. 4


Dahlgren expanded quickly in World War II, building housing in "Boomtown" for the new workers
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Shoreline of Tarrytown/Boomtown and North view of Naval Proving Ground (NPG)

Explosives have been tested for decades at Pumpkin Neck. In the 1960's, a half-mile long Conical Shock Tube was constructed to simulate the effect of nuclear weapons on various materials. The project required a mass of 3,000,000 pounds of reinforced concrete to manage the recoil of a test blast.

Testing equipment includes cameras able to capture a million frames per second to document how fragments move after explosive detonations. The technicians have mastered both technology and real-world safety procedures. When in one bunker, well protected against explosions, the workers look up during tests. The bunker shakes, and at times black snakes fall down from the ceiling.

Dahlgren helped develop a case light enough for carrier aircraft to carry a nuclear bomb. To simulate an airdrop, the ELSIE test site (named for the "light case" of "LC" project) included a gun barrel to fire prototypes at 30-40' thick concrete targets. The final result was the Mark 8 nuclear weapon, one-third the weight and half the diameter of the Little Boy atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945.


massive walls made of concrete blocks, use in development of the Mark 8 nuclear warhead, still remain on Tisdale Road
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Project ELSIE

U238 uranium was used in the tests as well as depleted uranium, from which the U235 had been separated. A barbette, a tube of thick steel cut from old battleships used to test how warheads would explode, became slightly radioactive from the exposure to the uranium.

Other sites that also used depleted uranium for testing of the Phalanx Gun System were cleaned up, but for years one barbette was left in an isolated location at Dahlgren. The history of its use and how it became slightly rdioactive was forgotten, so the risk of moving it was unknown. A chance encounter with a former employee revealed its original use, and finally allowed for the safe disposal of the radioactive barbette. 5


the Conical Shock Tube allowed technicians at Dahlgren to use conventional explosives to test the effects of a nuclear blast
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, DASACON Conical Shock Tube

Today Naval Support Facility Dahlgren manages the Potomac River Test Range, "the nation's largest fully-instrumented over-the-water gun firing range," as well as land facilities on both sides of the Matchodoc Creek and operations at Dam Neck in Virginia Beach. The full length of the Potomac River Test Range extends from Dahlgren to the mouth of the Potomac River at Smith's Point. Tests are conducted typically between 8:00am-5:00pm on weekdays. For safety, range control boats flying a red flag provide on-the-water boaters a warning to stay out of the danger area.


Dahlgren manages the Potomac River Test Range, with multiple instrumentation stations downstream
Source: NSWC Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren: A Unique National Asset

In 2008, Dahlgren developed the modifications needed for an Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system on the USS Lake Erie to shoot down an American satellite. It was falling out of orbit, and there were fears that the hydrazine tank might survive re-entry and impact on land. The missile intercepted the satellite and ruptured the hydrazine tank, and all components then burned up in the atmosphere.


Dahlgren helped modify the ballistic missile launched from an Aegis cruiser that destroyed a US satellite in orbit
Source: NSWC Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren's Joint Government/National Laboratory/Industry Team Makes History in Satellite Shootdown

The facility played a key role in developing the Tomahawk Weapon System in the 1970's. It now has the leadership role for research into development of an electromagnetic railgun and other pulsed power, microwave, and laser technologies. The base in King George County also houses the US Navy's chemical, biological and radiological defense lab. A component located at Naval Air Station Oceana Dam Neck Annex in Virginia Beach develops computer programs for shipboard combat direction systems. 6


Dahlgren is developing railguns that fire projectiles by electromagnetic force rather than energetic propellants
Source: Navy Live blog, ONR 32MJ electromagnetic railgun (EMRG) (August 2, 2015)



railguns being developed at Dahlgren would operate on electricity rather than chemical propellants
Source: US Navy, Image Gallery and CHIPS

Over 11,000 people were employed at Dahlgren in 2019, making it the largest employer in King George County. Roughly half were Federal civilian employees, and half were contractors. Less than 5% were uniformed members of a military service. Nearly all lived in Virginia, though the nearby Harry Nice (Route 301) bridge allows for easy crossing of the Potomac River. The US Navy horiginally had to construct housing on the base for workers because Dahlgren was so isolated in 1918. The rapid expansion during World War II led to construction of cheap houses lined up in rows and known as "Boomtown," but most workers are commuters to Dahlgren now


most of the employees at Dahlgren (over 11,000 now) live in Virginia
Source: NSWC Dahlgren Division, Economic Impact

Naval Support Facility Dahlgren is part of the Naval Sea Systems Command. It operates as a Defense Working Capital Fund facility. Instead of receiving direct appropriations in the annual budget passed by the US Congress, Dahlgren has to find customers within the Defense Department that seek the services and expertise offered at the base. The base has an annual budget of $1.5 billion, indicating its success in research and development. 7

Though much of the expertise at Dahlgren involves computers, the facility still conducts weapon tests on a regular basis. Typically, inert seven-inch wide target projectiles are fired for up to 13 miles downstream, where they will impact the river and sink to the bottom. The official range today extends 25 miles downstream of the US 301 bridge connecting Virginia and Maryland. The longest test was conducted in 1928, when a 2,100 pound projectile was sent 50,000 yards (over 28 miles) downstream using 775 pounds of gunpowder.


during most weapons tests, the Potomac River Test Range may be closed to boaters from the Route 301 bridge down to Corotoman Creek
Source: NSWC Dahlgren Division, Safe Boating in the Potomac River Middle Danger Area

Occasionally, fishermen will get a shell caught in their bottom-dragging nets. US Navy officials suggest immediately dropping them back into the river, rather than betting the fisherman's life that the shell is a "live" round from testing dating back to 1918. The greatest objections o the tests come from nearby residents who object to the noise. Since the guns are placed on the Virginia shoreline, Maryland residents experience the most noise.

The US Navy will not move its range, though some tests are conducted in the Arizona desert where there are no residents to object to the noise. Dahlgren is easily accessible, with greater security compared to a test range in the ocean. It is long enough to conduct over-water and over-the-horizon tests, in four distinct seasons. In response to complaints about the noise, a US Navy official stated: 8

Nowhere in the country, and probably nowhere in the world, is there a range like this. The river provides us with environmental characteristics that the desert can't.

Government Railroad (Dahlgren Branch)

King George County

Military Bases in Virginia

Potomac River


the Harry Nice (Route 301) bridge allows Maryland residents to access Dahlgren, but Fredericksburg is the nearest city
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

Links


early development of Dahlgren, on the Potomac River
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Yardcraft facility at NPG, Dahlgren


Dahlgren was located on the Potomac River so more-powerful US Navy guns and gunpowder could test longer-distance firing
Source: Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, Virginia - Main Battery Shoreline

References


Dahlgren is close to other military bases, facilitating research sharing and implementation
Source: NSWC Dahlgren Division, Dahlgren: A Unique National Asset


The USS Monitor- To Rise Again

Last summer two teams of divers and researchers dived on the wreck of the ironclad USS Monitor, surveyed the location of artifacts, took high-definition video images and catalogued nearby marine life. Dan Crowell, who organized one expedition, pointed out how such images can aid in the recovery and preservation process. Video that he took of the sunken vessel in 1994, for example, eventually assisted in the recovery of the ship’s engines. The collaboration between divers and researchers “is a very valuable tool in the management process for the sanctuary,” said historian Jeff Johnson. “The data will help NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] decide what it will do with the Monitor site over the next five to seven years.”

Today Monitor is one of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries. Conservation has been an integral part of the sanctuary since its inception. With the help of the U.S. Navy as well as other divers and researchers, it has recovered not only the vessel’s gun turret but also its engine, cannons and propeller, as well as smaller items such as bottles, silverware and clothing.

“The reality is that all wrecks are on a slow march to deterioration,” explained David Alberg, the sanctuary superintendent. “You can’t stop that without radical measures being taken.” It will take hundreds of years before Moni tor corrodes away, but Alberg said that conserved artifacts can help “teach about both the maritime past and our current ocean resources.”

Alberg said the sanctuary is currently focusing on recovering additional artifacts. Last summer’s second expedition, which took place in August, comprised a team of divers from aquariums and dive centers—perhaps an indication that sanctuary officials might shift their focus to biology. The Smithsonian Institution’s Marine Botany department will analyze the samples they collected. The superintendent explained, “We want to get a better understanding of the communities on the wreck—how do they affect the wreck, and how has the wreck impacted their communities?”

The sanctuary may also be looking to expand its scope, as it has started surveying some of the other wrecks near Monitor. Thousands of vessels have perished in the “Graveyard of the Atlantic,” as this wreckage-strewn stretch of seaway is known. There has been particular interest in World War II wrecks lost during the Battle of the Atlantic, between 1939 and 1945.

Visitors to the Monitor Center at the Mariners’ Museum in Newport News, Va., can get a bird’s-eye view of the ironclad’s turret and other artifacts as they are being preserved in the Batten Conservation Laboratory. The turret sits in a 90,000-gallon tank filled with treatment solution, where the chlorides accumulated over the course of 140 years beneath the sea gradually leach out. The vessel’s steam engine sits nearby in a 30,000-gallon tank, as do the two 11-inch Dahlgren guns that were removed from the turret.

The preservation process is “pretty simple,” according to David Krop, the center’s conservation project manager: “These artifacts have soaked up salts, sulfur and other impurities. At the same time, they’ve developed a thick layer of concreted marine sediments that form a tough matrix around the artifact. We soak them to help remove all of that, and when that’s done we dry the artifacts, then apply a protective coating.”

For the turret, that process will take about 20 years, though it’s faster for smaller artifacts. The center unveils a new batch of these smaller finds each March during Hampton Roads Weekend, commemorating the anniversary of the battle and the Monitor Center’s 2007 opening.

Recently placed on display was a fragile reminder of the past that also presages the museum’s goals for the future: the reconstructed fragments of a glass bottle, dubbed the “Phoenix flask.” Found in the revolving gun turret, the shards were pieced back together by conservators, who noticed a distinctive decoration. “You can see the head and wings of a bird,” said Anna Holloway, curator. “There’s also a Latin inscription Resurgam—I shall rise again.”

This March the museum will roll out Monitor’s propeller shaft, which will join the propeller—already on permanent display—as well as bullets from inside the turret, and leather boots and tools. Also scheduled to appear soon is the engine room clock.

Two sets of human remains were discovered in the gun turret, which are now being analyzed by the U.S military at the Joint POW-MIA Accounting Command. Also recovered were personal belongings of some of the crew, including silverware with the initials S.A.L., which has been traced to officer Samuel Augee Lewis.

Alberg estimates that to date about 80 percent of the ironclad remains on the sea floor. When it foundered in a storm on New Year’s Eve in 1862, it landed upside down in 240 feet of water. As a result, some of the wreck has collapsed. And with many of the artifacts in conservation at the Monitor Center, the wreck doesn’t exactly look like the full-size reconstruction on display at the museum.

Alberg reiterated that divers—who must obtain a permit to dive on the site—are essential to providing information on the state of the sanctuary. “Recreational divers have become our eyes and ears,” he said.

Final recommendations for the sanctuary’s future plans aren’t expected until this spring or summer. “We’ve got all the right people working on answers to those questions,” Alberg explained. Many different groups are involved because Monitor itself tells an “important cultural engagement story.”

“This ship was built as a weapon to fight Merrimack,” Alberg said. “It became the savior of the Union and the stage for human drama the night it sank. It was a mystery for 130 years, then it was located and became a sanctuary. John Ericsson [Monitor’s designer] could never have imagined that maybe its most significant role is teaching us about ocean processes. That may be its most important legacy.”

Kristina Fiore is a health and science writer based in Glen Ridge, N.J.

Originally published in the February 2010 issue of Civil War Times. To subscribe, click here.


[1132 x 703]Four-Piper Friday! USS Dahlgren (DD-187) in 1931

In the past I've mentioned the Flush Deck Destroyers (Caldwell, Wickes, and Clemson classes) were built to different quality standards. Some were really good ships that served as destroyers through the end of WWII. Some were OK, and served most of the war as destroyers, but later on were converted to something else. Some were bad and converted before the 1942 or sold to Britain. And some were garbage and never made it to WWII at all, most of these due to shoddy boilers. Some historians divide these into twelve different subclasses, and when you start tracking the individual ships you'll find the subclass is a good indicator for what modifications the ship received and it's assignments.

Of the 88 Clemson class destroyers that survived to 1939, 13 were of the Clemson subclass (or if you prefer Clemson-I class). These qualify as "bad", and while only one did not make it to 1939 (Graham, damaged in a collision in 1922), but they spent most of the interwar years decommissioned and in reserve. As war approached, seven were sold to the British as part of the Destroyers for Bases Agreement and the remaining six recommissioned if not already back in service. Three of these were among the 14 converted to seaplane tenders along with other similarly poor ships of other Clemson subclasses. The US had less of a need for seaplane tenders as the war went on, so the three Clemson AVDs were reclassified "destroyers" (with no real modifications that I have found) and later converted into amphibious assault ships.

Dahlgren was one of the three oddballs. Semmes became an auxiliary in 1935 and spent the war in a submarine division (which went by different names, in 1941 Experimental Division One) testing new sonar gear and training submarine crews. Dallas, the last of the subclass, spent most of the war as a destroyer squadron leader (1941 DesRon 30) and was clearly superior to her sisters in some way (as yet I don't know why). Dahlgren herself, however, was used to test some experimental 1,300 psi boilers from 1937, and as a consequence had a elongated third funnel, making her visually distinct from every other Flush Decker. This apparently made conversion to a seaplane tender or amphibious assault ship (which required ditching some boilers) impractical, so she remained a destroyer for most of her service life. She did receive a hedgehog and traded her aft torpedo tubes for six depth charge throwers, making her a rather good escort compared to many others. She was reclassified AG-91 on 1 March 1945.


USS Dahlgren (DD-187) at sea, 1945 - History

Construction of the ninth Nimitz class ship took place at Northrop Grumman Newport News, Va., starting with the ship's keel laying February 12, 1998, and christening March 4, 2001.

In September 2002, The newest Nimitz-class aircraft carrier moved a little closer to commissioning with the testing of the flight deck's catapult one. The tests ran included the launching of "dummy loads", to certify the ships ability to successfully launch aircraft.

The Reagan was scheduled for its first sea trials in February 2003, when the shipyard was to turn the ship over to the Navy.

Numerous delays began to impact on the construction of the CVN 76 in early 2003. Numerous weather delays prevented work from being completed in the flight deck and on the integrated communications system. Furthermore, a fire in late February caused by a faulty circuit breaker caused the Navy and the shipyard to postpone the delivery of the Reagan and her commissioning. Nearly 600 other circuit breakers were retested to insure safety, but it was discovered that nearly 20 percent of those tested were faulty.

In May 2003 the crew of PCU Ronald Reagan passed Phase II Crew Certification. The purpose of crew certification is to determine the ability of the crew to evaluate its own training and its competency to train to Type Commander objectives.

June 20, The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of the newest aircraft carrier, PCU Ronald Reagan.

July 12, 2003 USS Ronald Reagan was commissioned during an 11 a.m. ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station. Vice President Richard Cheney delivered the ceremony's principal address while Nancy Reagan, wife of the ship's namesake, served as the ship's sponsor.

August 28, Capt. James A. Simonds relieved Capt. John W. Goodwin as commanding officer of the CVN 76.

May 2, 2004 USS Ronald Reagan re-delivered to the Navy, marking the end of a five-month Post Shakedown Availability/Selected Restricted Availability (PSA/SRA) at Northrop Grumman, Newport News (NGNN). The re-delivery actually took place while the aircraft carrier was at sea off the Virginia coast, following the successful completion of 2 days of sea trials. Major work items completed during the PSA/SRA included the addition of a 1,300-square-foot gymnasium, expanded crew laundry facilities, mast antenna modifications to optimize performance, and upgrades to accommodate the Navy's newest tactical jet fighter the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet.

In early May the Reagan got underway for its second set of flight deck certifications. This was the ship's first underway since its maiden port visit to Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., in November 2003. Seven squadrons were on board to assist with the certification. The certifications began on May 5 and ended on May 8.

May 10, an F-14 from VF-213 "Black Lions", was launched from the carrier in what was the final Tomcat to leave the deck of USS Ronald Reagan.

May 27, USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Station Norfolk for the final time to circumnavigate South America on its way to its new homeport of San Diego.

June 9, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, for a scheduled port visit.

June 27, USS Ronald Reagan get anchored off the coast of Valparaiso, Chile, for a port call.

June 29, Latin America&rsquos first multinational amphibious exercise launched June 24 with a record 11 nations participating: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, United States and Uruguay, along with observers from Colombia and Mexico. More than 5,000 U.S. Sailors and Marines will participate in the amphibious phase of UNITAS, including Marine Force UNITAS, USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and USS Ronald Reagan Strike Group. This year's UNITAS is part of the U.S. Navy's Summer Pulse 2004, which involves the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier strike groups (CSGs), demonstrating the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power across the globe, in five theaters with other U.S., allied, and coalition military forces. Summer Pulse is the Navy&rsquos first deployment under its new Fleet Response Plan (FRP).

July 5, USS Ronald Reagan CSG completed Silent Forces Exercises (SIFOREX), after four days of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) tactics with the Peruvian Navy.

July 23, CVN 76 arrived in Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, Calif., after a two-month transit from Norfolk, Va.

November 6, USS Ronald Reagan got underway for the first time since arriving at its new homeport of San Diego. The ship has been in a maintenance availability period since its arrival to have repairs done and to upgrade work centers that weren’t completed while the ship was in Norfolk.

December 16, CVN 76 is currently underway in Pacific Ocean cunducting carrier qualifications for the west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS).

January 11, 2005 The Reagan departed San Diego for a routine carrier operations in the local area and to drop off two Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 C-2A Greyhound aircraft in Hawaii to help support Operation Unified Assistance. Operation Unified Assistance is the worldwide humanitarian effort to help Southern Asia recover from the devastating tsunamis that paralyzed the region Dec. 26.

January 22, The aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a three-day port visit after spending 12 days underway on a mission supporting Operation Unified Assistance. It returned to San Diego on Feb. 5.

March 30, USS Ronald Reagan is currently undergoing a period of planned maintenance availability in her homeport of San Diego.

April 19, CVN 76 is currrently conducting Carrier Assessment Readiness Test (CART II), in her homeport of Naval Air Station North Island, in preparation for an upcomonig underway period.

April 27, The aircraft carrier is currently conducting routine carrier operations in the Pacific Ocean.

May 16, The Reagan is currently underway in Pacific Ocean conducting carrier qualifications for the west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons.

May 30, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway conducting routine carrier operations.

June 3, The Reagan is currently conducting Combat System Ship&rsquos Qualification Trials (CSSQT).

June 15, CVN 76 is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting a Board of Inspection and Survey inspection.

June 24, The RR returned to its homeport after routine carrier operations in Pacific Ocean. Underway again on June 27 to conduct CQ for various West coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons.

July 10, Reagan is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA).

July 16, Hundreds of friends, family members and shipmates gathered, during a memorial service held aboard USS Ronald Reagan, to remember retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale and the former prisoner of war and Congressional Medal of Honor recipient who passed away July 5 in Coronado, Calif.

August 1, USS Ronald Reagan and embarked Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW 14) are currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting routine carrier operations.

August 10, CVN 76 is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting carrier qualifications for the various West Coast FRS.

August 20, The San Diego-based aircraft carrier is currently conducting a weekend port call in Santa Barbara, California.

September 20, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting CQ.

October 1, Nearly 3,000 friends and family members of the Reagan Sailors embarked the ship for a day of activities and sightseeing for the ship's Friends and Family Day Cruise. The event coincided with the annual San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which included demonstrations by various naval vessels and aircraft.

November 10, CVN 76 returned to homeport, after 18-day, following completion of the Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in preparation for the upcoming deployment next year.

November 17, Capt. Terry B. Kraft relieved Capt. James A. Symonds as CO of the USS Ronald Reagan, during a change-of-command ceremony held aboard the ship at Naval Air Station North Island.

December 6, The aircraft carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 departed San Diego to participate in Joint Task Force Exercise. JTFEX 06-2 is scheduled to take place Dec. 7-15 off the coast of southern California, and is designed to be a realistic exercise in real-world operations and the operational challenges faced by U.S. forces in cooperation with coalition militaries.

December 17, CVN 76 returned to homeport after completing a JTFEX 06-2.

January 4, 2006 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego on its maiden deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

January 9, Sailors from Reagan, civilian mariners from USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) and the pilots and aircrew of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 4 helped rescue a man who suffered from chest pains while aboard a civilian fishing vessel in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Two HH-60H helicopters from HS-4 were dispatched from carrier at approximately 10 a.m. to transport the patient from Rainier to Reagan for medical treatment.

From January 9-12, USS Ronald Reagan participated in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise off the coast of Hawaii. The goal of the exercise was to test the anti-submarine warfare capabilities of the CSG in real-world scenarios. Anti-submarine warfare is critical to support the "Sea Shield" pillar of the Chief of Naval Operation&rsquos "Sea Power 21." This concept calls for the ability to form a maritime shield to defend "Sea Base" areas against submarine and mine threats, and ensure a safe, protected sea passage of U.S. and coalition forces to and from the fight.

January 12, Cmdr. Gregory Harris relieved Cmdr. Steven James, as commanding officer of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

January 27, USS Ronald Reagan departed Brisbane, Australia, after a five-day port visit.

January 29, A single seat F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 25, "Fist of the Fleet", was involved in a mishap while attempting to land on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan approximately 120 miles southeast of Brisbane, Australia, Jan. 28 at approximately 4:17 a.m. (PST). The pilot ejected safely and was recovered. There were no injuries.

February 7, The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group arrived in Singapore for a scheduled port visit.

February 22, F/A-18E Super Hornets assigned to the "Eagles" of VFA-115 became the first aircraft launched from the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagan to drop ordnance on enemy targets in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

March 19, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a five-day port call.

April 27, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and USS McCampbell (DDG 85), took part in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the French navy aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R91) and FS Cassard (D614), the lead ship in the Cassard class of French anti-air frigates. Exercises included drills in communications, air defense and surface warfare tactics. Aircrafts from the Charles de Gaulle also made "touch-and-go" landings aboard Reagan during the exercise.

May 14, USS Ronald Reagan pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a liberty port visit to Dubai.

May 29, USS Ronald Reagan and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen concluded military operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AoO). CVW 14 launched more than 6,100 sorties, totaling more than 19,600 flight hours, more than 2,940 sorties and 14,200 flight hours have been in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

June 3, CVN 76 pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a scheduled port visit. Anchored off Hong Kong from June 10-14.

June 16, More than 300 aircraft and 28 ships from the USS Ronald Reagan, USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Carrier Strike Groups, as well as the Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard, will participate in exercise Valiant Shield 2006, off the coast of Guam, from June 19-23. The exercise will involve more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen.

July 6, USS Ronald Reagan returned to NAS North Island after a six-month deployment in the Arabian Gulf and western Pacific Ocean. As part of CVW-14, VAQ-139 was also the first EA-6B "Prowler" squadron to deploy with the Improved Capability Three (ICAP III) system. In addition, VFA-25, VFA-113, VFA-22 and VFA-115 were the first F/A-18 Hornet squadrons to deploy with ROVER (Remotely Operated Video Enhanced Receiver), a capability to communicate and transfer video to the JTAC (Joint Terminal Air Controller) on the ground.

August 15, The Reagan is currently underway for routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area.

August 28, CVN 76 is currently underway conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

October 20, USS Ronald Reagan returned to homeport following a successful week of carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California. The Reagan reached an aviation milestone Oct. 18, successfully completing 20,000 arrested landings since the ship was commissioned in 2003. Completing the milestone recovery was Lt. j.g. Robert Prince, from the Training Squadron (VT) 9 "Tigers", who has been in the naval aviation training program for the past 18 months.

November 3, A new type of aircraft arresting gear control system will be installed on USS Ronald Reagan in 2007 during the ship's next scheduled maintenance period. The new arresting gear control system, the Advanced Recovery Control System (ARC), replaces the mechanical systems and their associated controls used today with state-of-the-art arresting gear digital control system technology. The ARC system has successfully arrested the landings of all current and future Navy and Marine Corps carrier-based aircraft, like the T-45, E-2C+, F/A-18C/D, F/A-18E/F, EA-18G, S-3, and EA-6B aircraft.

November 9, USS Ronald Reagan CSG is off the coast of southern California participating in large-scale joint operations with the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group, which is conducting Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 07-1 in preparation for the upcoming deployment.

November 21, CVN 76 returned to San Diego following a 12-day quarterly sustainment training under the Navy's Fleet Response Training Plan (FRTP).

December 2, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway conducting routine carrier operations in the southern California operating area.

December 19, The Reagan is currently moored pierside at NAS North Island following a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualification (FRS-CQ).

January 27, 2007 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a surge deployment in the western Pacific, under the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), while USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) undergoes scheduled maintenance in Yokosuka, Japan.

February 9, CVN 76 Carrier Strike Group entered the U.S. 7th Fleet&rsquos area of responsibility (AOR).

February 24, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Lake Champlain (CG 57), pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a scheduled port visit.

March 1, Capt. Richard Butler relieved Capt. Craig Williams as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 during an aerial change of command ceremony. Butler, a native of Lexington, Ky., graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1983. He entered officer candidate school in 1983 and was designated a naval aviator in July 1985.

March 7, The Reagan CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a scheduled port call.

March 15, Capt. Richard "Rhett" Butler achieved his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing while flying an F/A-18E Super Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115.

March 18, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group took part in a passing exercise with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Philippine Sea March 16-18. JMSDF ships participating in the PASSEX were the JS Myoko (DDG 175), JS Hamagiri (DD 155), JS Yuugiri (DD 153) and JS Haruna (DDH 141).

March 22, CVN 76 arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a scheduled port visit in conjunction with Exercise Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration/Foal Eagle 2007. RSOI/FE 07 is a scheduled combined/joint exercise conducted annually involving forces from both the United States and the Republic of Korea.

April 7, USS Ronald Reagan concluded a three-day ammunition offload with the Military Sealift Command (MSC) ammunition ship USNS Flint (T-AE 32), marking the beginning of the end of carrier's surge deployment.

April 9, The aircraft carrier pulled into Pearl Harbor for a brief port visit. Before departing for San Diego, more than 500 friends and family members of the Reagan crew are expected to board the ship as part of the "Tiger Cruise."

April 20, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a three-month underway period.

October 31, CVN 76 returned to San Diego following a two-day sea trials, after a 6-month planned incremental availability (PIA). From advanced combat systems and electronics installation, improved berthing compartments and new deck tiles, Ronald Reagan received more than $150-million in renovations and upgrades since entering the PIA cycle in May.

November 9, The Reagan returned to homeport after completing four-days flight deck certification. Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Nov. 11.

November 16, Rear Adm. James P. Wisecup relieved Rear Adm. Charles W. Martoglio as commander of Carrier Strike Group Seven, during a change of command ceremony held aboard its flagship, USS Ronald Reagan.

November 27, CVN 76 departed homeport for Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) period.

December 15, Sailors from USS Ronald Reagan, and the pilots and aircrew of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Four (HS-4) rescued a teenage girl who suffered a ruptured appendix while aboard a Bermuda-flagged cruise ship off the coast of southern Baja California, Mexico.

December 18, The aircraft carrier returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a 21-day underway period completing the Tailored Ship's Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP).

January 11, 2008 USS Ronald Reagan anchored off Santa Barbara, Calif., for a scheduled port visit. During the two day period Jan. 8-10, the Military Sealift Command ammunition ship USNS Flint (T-AE 32) trasfered more than two million pounds of ordanance to CVN 76 Returned to San Diego on Jan. 15.

January 28, The Reagan is currently of the coast of southern California conducting carrier qualifications.

March 9, CVN 76 is currently conducting CQ for Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS) off the West Coast.

April 7, USS Ronald Reagan CSG returned to San Diego after completing a 22-day Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), off the coast of southern California, as part of the training cycle for a regularly scheduled deployment.

April 14, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group is currently participating in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 08-5, from April 11-18. Returned home on April 22.

May 19, USS Ronald Reagan, commanded by Capt. Kenneth J. Norton, departed NAS North Island for a scheduled deployment.

June 12, Cmdr. Richard T. Brophy relieved Cmdr. Eric K. Wright as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 19, CVN 76 CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a scheduled port visit.

June 25, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group and USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) recently arrived off the coast of Philippines to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to victims of the Typhoon Fengshen and to help in salvage operations for the ill-fated MV Princess of the Stars. The 24,000-tonne ferry was carrying 864 passengers and crew when it sank Saturday off Sibuyan Island, 300 kilometres south of Manila, at the height of a typhoon.

July 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed the Sulu Sea and the waters around the Philippine island of Panay, after assisting the Philippine government's humanitarian relief operation. Aircrews flew 332 sorties around Panay and delivered more than 519,000 pounds of much-needed supplies to typhoon victims.

July 6, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port call.

July 14, CVN 76 arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a scheduled port visit.

July 28, The Reagan pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a routine port call.

August 18, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Gridley (DDG 101) and USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a port visit.

September 3, The Reagan recently relieved USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) on station in the North Arabian Sea. CVN 76 launched its first sorties on Aug. 28, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

October 22, USS Ronald Reagan CSG is currently off the coast of India participating in Exercise Malabar 2008 Oct. 15-24.

October 25, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier arrived in Singapore for a scheduled port call.

November 17, The Reagan pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a routine port visit.

November 25, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment. The aircraft from CVW-14 launched more than 1150 sorties in support of ground forces in southern Afghanistan.

February 17, 2009 CVN 76 departed Naval Air Station North Island for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications off the coast of southern California. Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 is also training instructor pilots to aid the transition from EA-6B Prowler to EA-18G Growler while underway with the Reagan. This marks the first landing of VAQ 129's Growlers aboard an aircraft carrier.

March 26, The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after completing the two-week sustainment exercise in the Pacific Ocean, along with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 and ships from CSG 7. SUSTAINEX is the last coordinated exercise involving the ships of Carrier Strike Group Seven prior to its upcoming deployment later this year.

April 16, The aircraft carrier is currently off the coast of southern California conducting CQ.

May 28, USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for a scheduled western Pacific and Middle East deployment. The departure was delayed for 24 hours because of a malfunction in a voltage regulator on one of the ship's eight electrical generators.

June 21, CVN 76 commemorated the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Fengshen relief efforts while transiting the Sulu Sea near the Republic of the Philippines.

June 24, The Reagan moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a scheduled port visit.

July 6, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, after USS Ronald Reagan relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) on station in the North Arabian Sea.

August 2, Cmdr. Scott E. Raupp relieved Cmdr. Erik O. Etz as CO of the "Stingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113, during an aerial change of command ceremony.

September 12, Cmdr. Warren E. Sisson, III relieved Cmdr. Richard T. Brophy as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 22, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Gridley (DDG 101), anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a goodwill port call. The aircraft carrier recently completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR, launching more than 1,600 sorties in support of OEF.

October 13, CVN 76 pulled into Pearl Harbor for a brief port call and to pick up 850 "Tigers."

October 21, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a five-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

February 22, 2010 Chief Electrician&rsquos Mate (SS/DV) John G. Conyers died Friday after he suffered severe electrical shock while conducting routine electrical work aboard the Reagan. The aircraft carrier is currently undergoing a planned incremental maintenance period at Naval Air Station North Island.

May 18, USS Ronald Reagan departed for sea trials after completing the six-month PIA.

June 2, CVN 76 departed homeport to conduct flight deck certification with the CVW-14.

June 9, The Reagan anchored in the approach to Esquimalt harbor, near Victoria, British Columbia, to participate in the Canadian Naval Centennial Pacific Fleet Review, commemorating the 100th birthday of the Canadian Navy. USS Sampson (DDG 102), USS Chosin (CG 65) and USS Ford (FFG 54) are also participating.

June 16, USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego again, after picking up members from CVW-14, to conduct Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and to participate in biennial exercise Rim of the Pacific 2010, off the coast of Hawaii, from June 23 through Aug. 1.

June 28, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier arrived in Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for the in-port phase of 22nd RIMPAC. Thirty-two ships, five submarines, more than 170 aircraft and 20,000 personnel are participating.

August 8, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Naval Air Station North Island after nearly a two-month underway period. The RIMPAC exercise allowed Reagan to test its Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launcher weapons system for the first time since 2007.

August 12, Capt. Thom W. Burke relieved Capt. Kenneth J. Norton as CO of the Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

August 25, The Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment.

September 8, The aircraft carrier departed homeport for routine operations off the coast of southern California, in preparation for the upcoming deployment next year.

October 18, USS Ronald Reagan CSG departed for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the West Coast.

November 9, CVN 76 was diverted to a position south, to facilitate the delivery of needed supplies to the C/V Splendor. The Carnival cruise ship reported it was dead in the water early Monday, 150 nautical miles southwest of San Diego, and requested assistance from the Coast Guard.

December 17, The Reagan returned to homeport after a two-day underway off the coast of southern California.

January 4, 2011 USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Air Station North Island for a two-week training and certification in preparation for an upcoming deployment.

February 2, USS Ronald Reagan CSG departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR). The Strike Group will first participate in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX), off the coast of southern California, before heading west.

March 11, USS Ronald Reagan CSG, USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), USS Germantown (LSD 42) and USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) were ordered to head to Japan and render disaster relief, if called upon, in the wake of a catastrophic magnitude 9.0 earthquake that left thousands dead on Friday. The Reagan was previously scheduled to visit Busan, Republic of Korea, before participating in exercise Foal Eagle 2011.

March 13, CVN 76 arrived on station off the east coast of Honshu, early Sunday, to serve as an afloat platform for refueling Japan Self Defense Force and other helicopters involved in rescue and recovery efforts ashore.

March 23, USS Ronald Reagan took a pause from flight operations today in order to conduct a fresh water washdown, on its flight deck and embarked aircraft, to remove any remaining traces of radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant that might have been deposited while conducting disaster relief operations over the past 11 days.

April 8, USS Ronald Reagan is currently participating in exercise Malabar 2011, with the Indian Navy, in the Philippine Sea. The Reagan CSG concluded its support in Operation Tomodachi April 5.

April 18, Capt. Kevin Mannix, Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18F assigned to the "Black Knights" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154.

April 19, USS Ronald Reagan CSG arrived in Fleet Activities Sasebo for a three-day port call.

May 1, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group anchored off the coast of Phuket for a four-day visit to Thailand.

May 15, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 recently launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

May 22, USS Ronald Reagan pulled into Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd for a four-day visit to Kingdom of Bahrain.

June 23, Cmdr. Russell W. Jones relieved Cmdr. Christopher A. Middleton as CO of the "Cougars" of Tactical Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 139, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship. Jones will be the last Cougars commanding officer to fly an EA-6B Prowler since the squadron is scheduled to transition to the EA-18 Growler at the end of 2011.

August 12, USS Ronald Reagan CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a four-day port call.

August 21, The Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port visit.

August 31, The aircraft carrier arrived in Pearl Harbor for a three-day port visit and to pick up family and friends for a Tiger Cruise.

September 9, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a seven-month deployment.

October 14, CVN 76 departed Naval Air Station North Island for carrier qualifications with the CVW-14 Returned home Nov. 3.

November 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed again to conduct CQ, off the coast of southern California, for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM).

November 11, The Reagan is currently underway for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

January 6, 2012 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a 12-month, $210 million worth, Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) in Bremerton, Wash.

March 12, 2013 The Ronald Reagan moored to Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton's Pier Bravo after a three-day underway for sea trials Departed Bremerton on March 18 Returned to San Diego on March 21.

May 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed NAS North Island for a 12-day underway to conduct flight deck certifications, CVW-2/FRS Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and ammo onload with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4).

June 3, Vice Adm. Kenneth E. Floyd relieved Vice Adm. Gerald R. Beaman as Commander, U.S. Third Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Reagan at Naval Air Station North Island.

June 6, CVN 76 departed San Diego for a six-day underway to conduct routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area. Underway for FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications from July 11-22.

August 13, Capt. Christopher E. Bolt relieved Capt. Thom W. Burke as CO of the USS Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

September 5, The Ronald Reagan departed homeport for an eight-day underway to conduct routine training off the coast of southern California. Held an "Open House" at NAS North Island from Sept. 21-22 Underway again from Oct. 16-21 Underway for Group Sail with the CVW-2 and DESRON 9 from Oct. 30- Nov. 15.

December 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Air Station North Island for an eight-day underway to conduct routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ from Jan. 23-30, 2014 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-2 from March 17- April 8 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on April 9.

May 20, The Ronald Reagan departed homeport for FRS-CQ and ammo offload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7), after a six-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

May 30, USS Ronald Reagan anchored off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif., for a three-day port visit. Returned to NAS North Island on June 3.

June 12, CVN 76 departed San Diego for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-2 and to participate in biennial multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Departed SOCAL Op. Area on June 18.

June 23, Cmdr. Gregory P. Sawtell relieved Cmdr. Richard H. Weitzel as CO of the "Blue Hawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 78, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 26, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth H3/H4 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for the in-port phase of RIMPAC 2014 Underway for at-sea phase on July 7 Inport Pearl Harbor again from July 31- Aug. 3.

August 10, The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after a two-month underway period. Conducted Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) en route to San Diego.

August 14, Rear Adm. Patrick A. Piercey relieved Rear Adm. Patrick D. Hall as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Reagan.

September 4, Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $24,2 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4315) for the USS Ronald Reagan's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work will be performed in Coronado, Calif., and is expected to be completed by April 2015 An adittional $11,2 million contract was awarded on Sept. 19.

April 17, 2015 USS Ronald Reagan departed Juliet Pier, NAS North Island for sea trials following a seven-month PIA Moored at Kilo Pier on April 20 Underway for flight deck certifications and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 from April 28- May 3 Underway for Combat System Ship&rsquos Qualification Trials (CSSQT), ammo onload with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) and CVW-11/FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) from May 4-28.

June 26, The Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-2 Moored at Berth Lima on July 20 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 23.

July 24, Vice Adm. Nora W. Tyson relieved Vice Adm. Kenneth E. Floyd as Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 76.

August 5, USS Ronald Reagan departed Carrier Wharf, NAS North Island for local operations.

August 8, The Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Pier for a 10-day crew and equipment swap period. More than 1,400 crew members from Reagan will embark the USS George Washington for a two-month voyage to its new homeport of Norfolk, Virginia. The so called "Three Presidents Crew" will fly back to San Diego early next year. The rest of the Reagan's crew will stay in San Diego and will be assigned to USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).

August 26, CVN 76 departed NAS North Island for a three-day underway to conduct post hull swap assessment and flight deck certifications with the CVW-11.

August 31, USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a homeport change to Yokosuka, Japan.

September 1, USS Ronald Reagan embarked the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, temporarily stationed at NAS Fallon, Nev., for the first time Arrived off the coast of Hawaii on Sept. 10 Entered the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Operations on Sept. 17.

From September 23-24, the Ronald Reagan participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX), with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Preble (DDG 88), in the Guam Op. Area.

October 1, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, for the first time.

October 12, The Ronald Reagan hosted mored than 15,000 visitors during an "Open House" at CFAY.

October 15, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for its first western Pacific patrol as part of Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF).

October 18, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) participated in International Fleet Review, organised by the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in Sagami Bay.

October 18, An E-2C Hawkeye (Bureau #166505), assigned to the "Liberty Bells" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115, suffered a Class "A" electrical fire in Hangar Bay #1, around 1.27 p.m. local time, while the aircraft carrier was underway south of Sagami Bay.

October 22, CVN 76 anchored in a water depth of more than 165 feet, off the east coast of Busan, Republic of Korea, after it paid out 11 shots of anchor chain equal to more than 15 fathoms, for a two-day stop.

October 23, The Ronald Reagan CSG participated in Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy&rsquos Fleet Review, while at deep-water anchorage, in conjunction with the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the ROK Navy and national independence.

From October 26-29, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in an air defense exercises (ADEX), east of the Korean Peninsula, with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yulgok Yi I (DDG 992) and ROKS Yang Manchun (DDH 973).

October 30, The Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, ROK, for a five-day port visit.

November 14, Cmdr. David B. Waidelich relieved Cmdr. Michael D. France as CO of VAW-115 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the Philippine Sea.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in a nine-day bilateral Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 27G, between the U.S. and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in the waters south of Japan.

November 21, Cmdr. Douglas T. Gray relieved Cmdr. Geoffrey P. Bowman as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

From December 1-2, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) Returned to Yokosuka on Dec. 3.

April 12, 2016 Capt. Michael P. Donnelly relieved Capt. Christopher E. Bolt as the 7th CO of USS Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka.

May 9, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a four-day underway, to conduct sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Wally Schirra, following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Underway again from May 31- June 1.

June 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol.

June 18, The Ronald Reagan CSG-5 conducted dual carrier flight operations, with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3, while underway east of Okinawa, Japan Transited the Strait of Luzon westbound on July 1.

July 13, Cmdr. Daniel D. Cochran relieved Cmdr. Adrian T. Calder as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the South China Sea.

July 26, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Yokosuka after completing a seven-week patrol.

July 29, Rear Adm. Charles F. Williams relieved Rear Adm. John D. Alexander as Commander, Task Force (TF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan.

August 17, USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment Moored at Berth 12 on Aug. 18 Emergency sortied due to approaching Typhoon Lionrock from Aug. 28-31.

September 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

September 12, The Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2016, in the Guam Op. Area.

September 13, The F/A-18 Super Hornets, assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115 and Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 138, participated in a sinking exercise (SINKEX) of the ex-USS Rentz (FFG 46), 117 nautical miles northeast of Guam.

September 24, CVN 76 moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a five-day liberty port visit.

October 4, Cmdr. Robert G. Wickman relieved Cmdr. Kenneth P. Ward as CO of the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 10, Seaman Danyelle Luckey died aboard the USS Ronald Reagan, from a yet-to-be-determined cause, while the ship was underway southwest of the Korean Peninsula.

October 11, Cmdr. Gregory P. Malandrino relieved Cmdr. Rafe K. Wysham as CO of the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 14, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), USS Curtis Wlibur (DDG 54), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USS Stethem (DDG 63), participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Choe Yeong (DDH 981), ROKS Gyeonggi (FFG 812), ROKS Jeju (FF 958) and two Pohang-class corvettes, after a four-day bilateral training exercise Invincible Spirit in the waters of the Korean Peninsula.

October 16, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit.

October 30, The Ronald Reagan CSG-5 commenced its participation in ANNUALEX 28G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2017, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), north and east off Okinawa, Japan.

November 11, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville, USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS Barry (DDG 52) and USS Chicago (SSN 721), participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Izumo (DDH 183), JS Kurama (DDH 144), JS Ashigara (DDG 178), JS Yamagiri (DD 152), JS Akizuki (DD 115), JS Souryu (SS 501) and JS Oumi (AOE 426).

From November 18-19, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10).

November 21, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka following an 11-week patrol.

January 10, 2017 USS Ronald Reagan commenced a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while moored at Berth 12 Underway for sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Charles Drew from May 7-12.

May 16, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol after a one-day delay due to an "unspecified material issue."

May 22, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the northern Philippine Sea.

May 31, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 5 transited the Tsugaru Strait westbound Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) CSG-1 and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan, on June 1 Transited the Korean Strait southbound on June ? Transited the Luzon Strait westbound on June 12.

From June 13-15, the Ronald Reagan CSG participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the JS Izumo and JS Sazanami (DD 113), while transiting the South China Sea westbound.

June 17, CVN 76 moored at Berth 3/4, RSS Singapura (The ex-Changi Naval Base) for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore.

July 8, USS Ronald Reagan commenced its participation in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Sabre 2017, while underway in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

July 11, An MV-22B Osprey, assigned to the "Dragons" of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced) and currently embarked on the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), landed on board the Reagan for the first time.

July 23, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Grain Wharf in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day liberty visit.

August 9, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a 12-week patrol.

September 8, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

September 12, The Ronald Reagan completed a three-day Carrier Qualifications (CQ), with the CVW-5, while underway in the waters south of Japan Commenced a two-week bilateral training exercises, with the JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Sazanami (DD 113) and JS Akebono (DD 108), on Sept. 14.

September 15, Cmdr. Shane P. Tanner relieved Cmdr. Daniel R. Prochazka as CO of the "Tigertails" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Philippine Sea.

September 24, Cmdr. Alex L. Hampton relieved Cmdr. Daniel D. Cochran as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Philippine Sea.

September 29, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chafee (DDG 90), transited the Luzon Strait westbound Anchored at WA #2 in Victoria Harbour for a liberty port visit to Hong Kong from Oct. 2-6 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound, escorted by JS Shimakaze (DDG 172), on Oct. 7.

October 18, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Stethem (DDG 63), participated in a PHOTOEX with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yang Manchun (DDH 973), ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH 976), ROKS Kang Won (DD 922), ROKS Sokcho (PCC 778) and ROKS Gwangmyeong (PCC 782), at the start of a three-day Maritime Counter Special Operations exercise (MCSOFEX), in the waters east of the Korean Peninsula.

October 21, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit.

November 12, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in two PHOTOEXs with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) CSG, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG, JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Inazuma (DD 105), JS Makinami (DD 112) and six ROK Navy ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced a 10-day Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 28G, with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in the waters around Okinawa, Japan.

November 22, A C2-A Greyhound (Bureau #162175), assigned to the "Providers" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Det. 5, crashed approximately 90 miles northwest of Okinotorishima Atoll, at about 2:45 p.m. JST, while en route from MCAS Iwakuni to CVN 76. Eight personnel aboard have been rescued. Lt. Steven Combs, Aviation Boatswain&rsquos Mate Airman Matthew Chialastri and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Apprentice Bryan Grosso are lost at sea.

From December 1-2, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10).

December 4, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka after completing a three-month patrol.

May 11, 2018 The Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for sea trials following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) from May 14-15 Returned home on May 17.

May 29, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol after a one-day delay due to an "unspecified material issue."

June 3, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

June 11, USS Ronald Reagan CSG-5 commenced its participation in a trilateral exercise Malabar 2018, with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and Indian Navy ships, in the Guam Op. Area Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX), east of Saipan, on June 15 Entered the South China Sea on June 24.

June 26, USS Ronald Reagan anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on July ?.

From July 6-7, the Ronald Reagan participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX), with the USS Antietam (CG 54) and USS Milius (DDG 69), while underway east of Okinawa, Japan.

July 18, Rear Adm. Karl O. Thomas relieved Rear Adm. Marc H. Dalton as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 76, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

July 24, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a two-month patrol.

July 27, The Ronald Reagan emergency sortied from Yokosuka due to approaching Typhoon Jongdari Returned home on July 30 Held an "Open House," in conjunction with the 42nd annual Friendship Day festival, on Aug. 4 Emergency sortied again due to approaching Typhoon Shanshan on Aug. 7 Moored at Berth 12 on Aug. 10.

August 14, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

August 31, The Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Antietam, USS Milius, JS Kaga (DDH 184), JS Suzutsuki (DD 117) and JS Inazuma (DD 105), as a "show of force" in the South China Sea.

September 10, Capt. Patrick J. Hannifin relieved Capt. Michael P. Donnelly as the 8th CO of Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

September 17, USS Ronald Reagan CSG-5 participated in a PHOTOEX at the start of a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2018, in the Guam Op. Area.

September 24, The Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for an extended eight-day liberty port visit.

October 11, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Benfold (DDG 65), participated in a pass-in-review, while underway off the south coast of Jeju Island, as part of the Republic of Korea (ROK) International Fleet Review (IFR) 2018.

October 12, CVN 76 moored at Pier A, Jeju Civilian-Military Complex on Jeju Island, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port call.

October 19, An MH-60R Sea Hawk, assigned to the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, made an emergency landing and crashed on the ship&rsquos flight deck, shortly after takeoff at 9 a.m. local time, while the Reagan was underway in the Philippine Sea. Some servicemembers were medically evacuated to a hospital in the Philippines.

October 29, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in ANNUALEX 30G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2019, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, north and east off Okinawa, Japan Participated in a PHOTOEX on Nov. 8.

November 12, An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, crashed in the Philippine Sea around 11.45 a.m., approximately 150 miles southeast of Naha, Okinawa Prefecture, after experienced a mechanical issue. Both crewmembers ejected safely and were recovered.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville, participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG-3, as a "show of force" in the Philippine Sea.

November 21, The Ronald Reagan anchored at Western Anchorage (WA) #2 in Victoria Harbour for a four-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong to celebrate the Thanksgiving Day.

December 5, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka after completing a nearly four-month patrol.

May 17, 2019 The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after a five-day underway for sea trials, following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

May 22, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a routine Summer Patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR).

June 11, The Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Izumo (DDH 183), JS Murasame (DD 101) and JS Akebono (DD 108), while underway in the South China Sea Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on June 14 Transited westbound again on June 17.

June 18, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) and USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193), while underway off the northwest coast of Philippines Conducted replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9) on June 27 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on June 28.?

July 3, Cmdr. Bryan M. Haney relieved Cmdr. Luke H. Davis as CO of the "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Coral Sea.

July 5, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Grain Wharf in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day visit before participating in a biennial exercise Talisman Sabre 2019 Conducted replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry, while underway in the Coral Sea, on July 21.

August 2, Capt. Michael A. Rovenolt relieved Capt. Forrest O. Young as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

August 7, USS Ronald Reagan anchored approximately 6 n.m. off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Aug. 13 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4) on Aug. 14.

August 17, Capt. Michael Rovenolt, CO of the CVW-5, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27.

August 24, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a three-month patrol Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 25.

September 14, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol Conducted Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-5, off the coast of Shikoku, from Sept. 15-19.

September 20, Capt. Steven H. DeMoss relieved Capt. Jonathan C. Duffy as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan, while underway off the south coast of Japan.

September 23, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), entered the South China Sea after transiting the Luzon Strait westbound Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson and USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) on Sept. 25.

September 29, Rear Adm. George M. Wikoff relieved Rear Adm. Karl O. Thomas as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan.

October 6, USS Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Boxer (LHD 4), USS Antietam (CG 54), USS Chancellorsville and USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), while underway as a "show of force" in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear on Oct. 14.

October 17, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 3/4, RSS Singapura for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear, while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Oct. 28 Conducted ammo offload from Oct. 30-31.

November 2, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a seven-week patrol.

May 5, 2020 The Ronald Regan departed homeport for sea trials, following a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) from May 8-10 Brief stop in Kaneda Wan on May 14 Moored at Berth 12 on May 15 Underway again on May 21.

May 22, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) Brief stop in Sagami Wan on May 23 Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Carl Brashear, while underway east of Okinawa, on May 28 Returned home on on June 5.

June 8, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a scheduled patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet AoR.

June 12, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3), while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on June 24 Transited the San Bernardino Strait southbound on July 3.

July 6, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Antietam and USS Mustin (DDG 89), participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS Princeton (CG 59) and USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), while underway as a "show of force" in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) on July 7 Transited the Lombok Strait southbound on July 1? Transited the Sunda Strait northbound on July 15.?

July 18, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4), while underway in the South China Sea Transited the Balabac Strait eastbound on July 19 Transited the Surigao Strait northbound on July 20.

July 21, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Teruzuki (DD 116), HMAS Canberra (L02), HMAS Hobart (DDG 39), HMAS Arunta (FFH 151), HMAS Stuart (FFH 153) and HMAS Sirius (O 266), while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197) on July 22.

July 28, The Ronald Reagan CSG is currently conducting operations in the East China Sea, off the southwest coast of Japan Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) on July 31 Moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a brief stop on Aug. 1 Transited the Tsugaru Strait westbound on Aug. 6 Transited the Korean Strait southbound on Aug. 8 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard, while underway north of Okinawa, on Aug. 10.

August 11, Cmdr. Joseph J. Hubley relieved Cmdr. Brent H. Jaquith as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 14, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115), transited the Luzon Strait westbound Transited eastbound on Aug. 15 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) on Aug. 16.

August 20, Cmdr. Joshua M. Ales relieved Cmdr. Bryan M. Haney as CO of the "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

August 22, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day liberty port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Sept. 1 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) on Sept. 5 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USS Mustin on Sept. 7.

September 10, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a one-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard and USNS Tippecanoe on Sept. 13.

September 19, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 participated in a sinking exercise (SINKEX) of the ex-USS Curts (FFG 38), off the northeast coast of Guam, as part of a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2020.

September 22, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard and USNS Tippecanoe Participated in a PHOTOEX, while underway off the east coast of Guam, on Sept. 25 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on Sept. 28.

October 1, Capt. Frederick C. Goldhammer relieved Capt. Patrick J. Hannifin as the 9th CO of CVN 76 during a short ceremony in the ship's pilot house, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

October 3, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos, while underway in the Philippine Sea Transited the Balabac Strait westbound on Oct. 6 Transited the Strait of Singapore on Oct. 8 Transited the Malacca Strait northbound from Oct. 8-9 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) on Oct. 10 Transited southbound from Oct. 11-12 Transited the Strait of Singapore eastbound on Oct. 12.

October 14, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard, while underway in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos on Oct. 18 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on Oct. 19 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Oct. 25.

October 26, USS Ronald Reagan participated in PHOTOEX with the USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS Barry (DDG 52), JS Kaga (DDH 184), JS Ikazuchi (DD 107), JS Makinami (DD 112), JS Fuyuzuki (DD 118), JS Shiranui (DD 120), JS Yamagiri (DD 152), JS Amagiri (DD 154), JS Sawagiri (DD 157), JS Shimakaze (DDG 172), JS Ashigara (DDG 178), HMCS Winnipeg (FFH 338), USNS Tippecanoe and JS Mashu (AOE 425), commencing the biennial field training exercise Keen Sword 21 in the waters south of Japan.

October 27, Cmdr. Daniel O'Hara relieved Cmdr. Harry C. Evans, III as CO of the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

November 5, Rear Adm. William C. Pennington, Jr., relieved Rear Adm. George M. Wikoff as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a brief ceremony aboard the Reagan.

November 6, Capt. Adrian T. Calder relieved Capt. Michael A. Rovenolt as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

From November 12-13, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammo offload with the USNS Alan Shepard.

November 14, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a five-month patrol.

May 11, 2021 USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for sea trials following a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) from May 14-15 Moored at Berth 12 on May 16.

May 19, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

May 25, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197) and USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) on May 27 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204), while underway east of Okinawa, on June 3 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart on June 13.

June 14, The Ronald Reagan transited the Luzon Strait westbound Participated in a PHOTOEX with the RSS Intrepid (FFS 69) on June 17 Transited the Strait of Singapore on June 18 Transited the Malacca Strait northbound from June 18-19.

June 21, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the JS Kashima (TV 3508) and JS Setoyuki (TV 3518), while underway in the Indian Ocean.


Third Patrol

7 February 1945 - 20 April 1945

On 7 February 1945, SEA DEVIL cleared Pearl Harbor for her 3d war patrol. On the 19th, she arrived at Saipan for training in wolfpack tactics, and, on the 27th, she sailed for the Yellow Sea in company with submarines TENCH (SS-417), GUARDFISH (SS-217), and BALAO (SS-285).

At the end of the month, she was diverted to search for downed aviators and, on 3 March, she continued on to her patrol area to further decrease the declining traffic between China and Manchuria, and the Japanese home islands.

For over a week, fishing junks, sailing junks, and floating mines provided the only contacts. On the 24th, she sighted a large tanker with four escorts but lost the convoy. On the 25th, she sighted and evaded a Japanese hunter-killer group. On the 29th, she sank or exploded four mines and attempted to do& the same to two others. Fog shrouded her area during the last days of the month. On 2 April, visibility was still poor, less than 1,000 yards.

At 0710, she made radar contact with an enemy convoy-four merchantmen and three escorts.

At 0915, she commenced firing at the lead merchant ship. Forty seconds later, she fired at the next ship. She then swung around to bring her stern tubes to bear on a third merchant ship found herself well inside the escort on the convoy's starboard quarter continued swinging and fired three stern shots at the escort.

Between 0819 and 0822, seven hits were heard and felt. SEA DEVIL then left the formation and opened range to reload. The radar screen now showed only three small pips. The 3d torpedo of the 1st salvo had apparently missed its target and run on to hit the third Maru. After reloading, the submarine tracked the remaining units of the convoy. Shortly after 1000, she fired on and damaged one of the escorts.

Forty minutes later, she fired on the remaining merchantman and observed it suddenly disappear from the radar screen. After 1100, she made her way through the wreckage to pick up survivors. Only four allowed themselves to be picked up and, of these, one died of his wounds. Of the seven ships, SEA DEVIL had sunk three, cargo ships TAIJO MARU, EDOGAWA MARU, and MISSHAN MARU, and had damaged the fourth Maru and at least one of the escorts.

The submarine remained in her Yellow Sea patrol area for another three days, then headed for Midway.

On the 6th, however, she received orders to patrol south of Kyushu, and, on the 8th, she was ordered closer to Okinawa in search of four downed Marine Corps pilots. The pilots, from aircraft carrier ESSEX (CV-9), had been covering the movements of battleship YAMATO and, on running low on fuel, had ditched in a location they thought to be near Okinawa. Prior to midnight, on the 8th, SEA DEVIL located three of the pilots 200 miles northeast of Okinawa. The search for the fourth continued through the night.

With dawn on the 9th, friendly planes joined in the search. But they, too, were unsuccessful and, in the late afternoon the submarine continued southeastward. On 13 April, SEA DEVIL arrived at Saipan. On the 20th, she completed her patrol, for which she was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation, at Midway.

Names of those rescued by Sea Devil
during the third patrol


The Third Patrol version of the Battle Flag. One more Bull's eye to go


Contents

The history of the yard can be divided into its military history and cultural and scientific history.

Military Edit

The land was purchased under an Act of Congress on July 23, 1799. The Washington Navy Yard was established on October 2, 1799, the date the property was transferred to the Navy. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy. The Yard was built under the direction of Benjamin Stoddert, the first Secretary of the Navy, under the supervision of the Yard's first commandant, Commodore Thomas Tingey, who served in that capacity for 29 years.

The original boundaries that were established in 1800, along 9th and M Street SE, are still marked by a white brick wall that surrounds the Yard on the north and east sides. The following year, two additional lots were purchased. The north wall of the Yard was built in 1809 along with a guardhouse, now known as the Latrobe Gate. After the Burning of Washington in 1814, Tingey recommended that the height of the eastern wall be increased to ten feet (3 m) because of the fire and subsequent looting.

The southern boundary of the Yard was formed by the Anacostia River (then called the "Eastern Branch" of the Potomac River). The west side was undeveloped marsh. The land located along the Anacostia was added to by landfill over the years as it became necessary to increase the size of the Yard.

From its first years, the Washington Navy Yard became the navy's largest shipbuilding and shipfitting facility, with 22 vessels constructed there, ranging from small 70-foot (21 m) gunboats to the 246-foot (75 m) steam frigate USS Minnesota. The USS Constitution came to the Yard in 1812 to refit and prepare for combat action.

During the War of 1812, the Navy Yard was important not only as a support facility but also as a vital strategic link in defense of the capital city. Sailors of Navy Yard were part of the hastily assembled American army, which, at Bladensburg, Maryland, opposed the British forces marching on Washington.

An independent volunteer militia rifle company of civilian workers in the Washington Navy Yard was organized by the United States naval architect William Doughty in 1813, and they regularly drilled after working hours. In 1814, Captain Doughty's volunteers were designated the Navy Yard Rifles and assigned to serve under the overall command of Major Robert Brent of the 2nd Regiment of the District of Columbia Militia who was the first mayor of Washington, D.C. In late August, they were ordered to assemble at Bladensburg, Maryland to form the first line of defense in protecting the United States' capital city along with the majority of the American forces was ordered to retreat. [3] The Chesapeake Bay Flotilla of Joshua Barney joined the combined forces of Navy Yard sailors, and the U.S. Marines of the nearby Marine Barracks of Washington, D.C., and were positioned to be the third and final line of the American defenses. Together, they effectively used devastating artillery and fought in hand-to-hand combat with cutlasses and pikes against the British regulars before being overwhelmed. Benjamin King (1764-1840), a navy yard civilian master blacksmith, fought at Bladensburg. King accompanied Captain Miller's Marines into battle. King took charge of a disabled gun and was instrumental in bringing that gun into action. Captain Miller remembered King's gun "cut down sixteen of the enemy." [4] [5]

As the British marched into Washington, holding the Yard became impossible. Seeing the smoke from the burning Capitol, Tingey ordered the Yard burned to prevent its capture by the enemy. Both structures are now individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places. On August 30, 1814, Mary Stockton Hunter, an eyewitness to the vast conflagration, wrote her sister: "No pen can describe the appalling sound that our ears heard and the sight our eyes saw. We could see everything from the upper part of our house as plainly as if we had been in the Yard. All the vessels of war on fire-the immense quantity of dry timber, together with the houses and stores in flames produced an almost meridian brightness. You never saw a drawing room so brilliantly lighted as the whole city was that night." [6]

Civilian employment Edit

From its beginning, the navy yard had one of the biggest payrolls in town, with the number of civilian mechanics and laborers and contractors expanding with the seasons and the naval Congressional appropriation. [7]

Before the passage of the Pendleton Act on 16 January 1883, applications for employment at the navy yard were informal, mainly based on connections, patronage, and personal influence. On occasion, a dearth of applicants required a public announcement the first such documented advertisement was by Commodore Thomas Tingey on 15 May 1815 "To Blacksmiths, Eight or Ten good strikers capable of working on large anchors, and other heavy ship work, will find constant employ and liberal wages, by application at the navy yard, Washington" [8] Following the War of 1812, the Washington Navy Yard never regained its prominence as a shipbuilding facility. The waters of the Anacostia River were too shallow to accommodate larger vessels, and the Yard was deemed too inaccessible to the open sea. Thus came a shift to what was to be the character of the yard for more than a century: ordnance and technology. During the next decade, the Navy Yard grew to become by 1819 the largest employer in Washington, D.C., with a total number of approximately 345 workers.

In 1826 noted writer Anne Royall, toured the navy yard. She wrote,

"The navy yard is a complete work-shop, where every naval article is manufactured: it contains twenty-two forges, five furnaces, and a steam-engine. The shops are large and convenient they are built of brick and covered with copper to secure them from fire. Steel is prepared here with great facility. The numbers of hands employed vary at present there are about 200. A ship-wright has $2,50 per day, out of which he maintains his wife and family if he have any. Generally wages are very low for all manner of work a common laborer gets but 75 cents per day, and finds himself. The whole interior of the yard exhibits one continual thundering of hammers, axes, saws, and bellows, sending forth such a variety of sounds and smells, from the profusion of coal burnt in the furnaces, that it requires the strongest nerves to sustain the annoyance."

In 1819, Betsey Howard became the first female worker documented at the navy yard (and perhaps in the federal service), followed shortly after by Ann Spieden. Both Howard and Spieden were employed as horse cart drivers, "and like their male counterparts employed per diem, at $1.54 a day, working whole or part days as required." [10] [11]

In 1832 the Washington Navy Yard Hospital, hired Eleanor Cassidy O'Donnell to work as a nurse. [12]

During the Civil War the navy hired about two dozen women as seamstresses in the Ordnance Department, Laboratory Division. The Department produced naval shells and gunpowder. The women sewed canvas bags that were used to charge ordnance aboard naval vessels. They also sewed flags for naval vessels. Most of these workers were paid about $1.00 per day. [13] Their work was dangerous, for there was always the risk of a single errant spark igniting nearby gunpowder or pyrotechnics with catastrophic results, such as the explosion and fire on 17 June 1864 that killed 21 young women working at the U.S. Army Arsenal Washington D.C. [14] [15]

During World War II, the Washington Navy Yard at its peak employed over 20,000 civilian workers, including 1,400 female ordnance workers. [16]

The Yard was also a leader in technology as it possessed one of the earliest steam engines in the United States. The steam engine was the high-tech marvel of the early District and often commented on by authors and visitors. Samuel Batley Ellis, an English immigrant, was the first steam engine operator, and in 1810 was paid the high wage of $2.00 per day. The steam engine ran the sawmill and manufactured anchors, chain, and steam engines for vessels of war. [17] The 1835 Washington Navy Yard labor strike was the first labor strike of federal civilian employees]]. [18] The unsuccessful strike was from 29 July to 15 August 1835. The strike was over working conditions and in support of a ten-hour day. [19] [20]

Enslaved Labor Edit

For the first thirty years of the 19th century, the Navy Yard was the District's principal employer of enslaved and some free African Americans. Their numbers rose rapidly, and by 1808, the enslaved made up one-third of the workforce. [21] The number of enslaved workers gradually declined during the next thirty years. However, free and some enslaved African Americans remained a vital presence. One such person was former slave, later freeman, Michael Shiner 1805-1880 whose diary chronicled his life and work at the navy yard for over half a century [22] There is the documentation for enslaved labor euphemistically called "servants" still working in the blacksmith shop as late as August 1861. [23]

Civil War Era Edit

During the American Civil War, the Yard once again became an integral part of the defense of Washington. Commandant Franklin Buchanan resigned his commission to join the Confederacy, leaving the Yard to Commander John A. Dahlgren. President Abraham Lincoln, who held Dahlgren in the highest esteem, was a frequent visitor. The famous ironclad USS Monitor was repaired at the Yard after her historic battle with the CSS Virginia. The Lincoln assassination conspirators were brought to the Yard following their capture. The body of John Wilkes Booth was examined and identified on the monitor USS Montauk, moored at the Yard.

Following the war, the Yard continued to be the scene of technological advances. In 1886, the Yard was designated the manufacturing center for all ordnance in the Navy. Commander Theodore F. Jewell was Superintendent of the Naval Gun Factory from January 1893 to February 1896. Ordnance production continued as the Yard manufactured armament for the Great White Fleet and the World War I navy. The 14-inch (360 mm) naval railway guns used in France during World War I were manufactured at the Yard.

By World War II, the Yard was the largest naval ordnance plant in the world. The weapons designed and built there were used in every war in which the United States fought until the 1960s. At its peak, the Yard consisted of 188 buildings on 126 acres (0.5 km 2 ) of land and employed nearly 25,000 people. Small components for optical systems, parts of Little Boy, and enormous 16-inch (410 mm) battleship guns were all manufactured here. In December 1945, the Yard was renamed the U.S. Naval Gun Factory. Ordnance work continued for some years after World War II until finally phased out in 1961. Three years later, on July 1, 1964, the activity was re-designated the Washington Navy Yard. The deserted factory buildings began to be converted to office use. [24] In 1963, ownership of 55 acres of the Washington Navy Yard Annex (western side of Yard including Building 170) was transferred to the General Services Administration. [25] The Yards at the Southeast Federal Center are part of this former property and now includes the headquarters for the United States Department of Transportation. [26]

The Washington Navy Yard was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and designated a National Historic Landmark on May 11, 1976. [24] [27] It is part of the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District. It is also part of the Navy Yard, also known as Near Southeast, neighborhood. It is served by the Navy Yard – Ballpark Metro station on the Green Line.

The Marine Corps Museum was located on the first floor of the Marine Corps Historical Society in Building 58. The museum closed on July 1, 2005, during the establishment of the National Museum of the Marine Corps near Marine Corps Base Quantico. The Yard was headquarters to the Marine Corps Historical Center. That moved in 2006 to Quantico.

Cultural and scientific Edit

The Washington Navy Yard was the scene of many scientific developments. In 1804 at the request of President Thomas Jefferson, navy yard blacksmith Benjamin King built the first White House water closet/toilet. For which Architect Benjamin Latrobe reminded King, " How shall I get the president of the United States into good humor with you about his Water Closet, & his side roof which you were to make? He complains bitterly of you using the privilege of a Man of Genius against him, - that is of being a little forgetful. – I so well know the goodness of your disposition, that I am determined, if possible, to want his quarreling with you at all events about so dirty a business as a Water Closet." [28] King in 1805 again at Jefferson's behest built the first fire engine for the White House°. [29] In 1822, Commodore John Rodgers built the country's first marine railway for the overhaul of large vessels. John A. Dahlgren developed his distinctive bottle-shaped cannon that became the mainstay of naval ordnance before the Civil War. In 1898, David W. Taylor developed a ship model testing basin, which was used by the Navy and private shipbuilders to test the effect of water on new hull designs. The first shipboard aircraft catapult was tested in the Anacostia River in 1912, and a wind tunnel was completed at the Yard in 1916. The giant gears for the Panama Canal locks were cast at the Yard. Navy Yard technicians applied their efforts to medical designs for prosthetic hands and molds for artificial eyes and teeth.

Navy Yard was Washington's earliest industrial neighborhood. One of the earliest industrial buildings nearby was the eight-story brick Sugar House, built in Square 744 at the foot of New Jersey Avenue, SE, as a sugar refinery in 1797–98. In 1805, it became the Washington Brewery, which produced beer until it closed in 1836. The brewery site was just west of the Washington City Canal in what is now Parking Lot H/I in the block between Nationals Park and the historic DC Water pumping station. [30]

The Washington Navy Yard often functions as a ceremonial gateway to the nation's capital. From early on, due to its proximity to the White House, the navy yard was the site of recurrent presidential visits. The Washington Navy Yard station log confirms many of these visits, for example, those of John Tyler 5 July 1841, James K. Polk 4 March 1845, Franklin Pierce 14 December 1853, and Abraham Lincoln,18 May 1861 and 25 July 1861. There are also entries for foreign delegations and celebrities, e.g., 7 September 1825 for General Lafayette and 15 May 1860 for the visit of the first Japanese Embassy. [31] The body of World War I's Unknown Soldier was received here. Charles A. Lindbergh returned to the Navy Yard in 1927 after his famous transatlantic flight.

During the Civil War, a small number of women worked at the Navy Yard as flag makers and seamstresses, sewing canvas bags for gunpowder. [32] Women again entered the workforce in the 20th century in significant numbers during WWII, where they worked at the Naval Gun Factory making munitions. [32] Following the war, most were discharged, [32] they were again employed in significant numbers during WWI and WWII,in the modern era, women have increased their presence in executive, managerial, administrative, technical, and clerical positions.

From 1984 to 2015, the decommissioned destroyer USS Barry (DD-933) was a museum ship at the Washington Navy Yard as "Display Ship Barry" (DS Barry). Barry was frequently used for change of command ceremonies for naval commands in the area. [24] Due to declining visitors to the ship, the expensive renovations she required, and the District's plans to build a new bridge that would trap her in the Anacostia River, Barry was towed away during the winter of 2015-2016 for scrapping. [33] The U.S. Navy held an official departure ceremony for the ship on 17 October 2015. [34] [35] [36]

Today, the Navy Yard houses a variety of activities. It serves as headquarters, Naval District Washington, and houses numerous support activities for the fleet and aviation communities. The Navy Museum welcomes visitors to the Navy Art Collection [37] and its displays of naval art and artifacts, which trace the Navy's history from the Revolutionary War to the present day. The Naval History and Heritage Command is housed in a complex of buildings known as the Dudley Knox Center for Naval History. Leutze Park is the scene of colorful ceremonies.

2013 shooting Edit

On September 16, 2013, a shooting took place at the Yard. Shots were fired at the headquarters for the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters building #197. Fifteen people, including 13 civilians, one D.C. police officer, and one base officer, were shot. Twelve fatalities were confirmed by the United States Navy and D.C. Police. [38] [39] Officials said the gunman, Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old civilian contractor from Queens, New York, was killed during a gunfight with police. [40]

The Yard serves as a ceremonial and administrative center for the U.S. Navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations. It is headquarters for the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Reactors, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Naval Historical Center, the Department of Naval History, the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General's Corps, the United States Navy Band, the U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command and numerous other naval commands. Several Officers' Quarters are located at the facility.

Building 126 Edit

Building 126 is located by the Anacostia River, on the northeast corner of 11th and SE O Streets. The one-story building, built between 1925 and 1938, was recently renovated to be a net-zero energy building as part of the Washington Navy Yard Energy Demonstration Project. Features include two wind turbines, five geothermal wells, a battery energy storage system, one-hundred thirty-two 235 kW solar photovoltaic panels, and windows of electrochromic smart glass. [41]

Although inventoried and determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, it is currently not part of an existing district. [42] Until 1950, Building 126 functioned as the receiving station laundry. Afterward, it served as the site of the Washington Navy Yard Police Station. Currently, it acts as the Visitor Center for the Yard. [43]