Hofburg Imperial Palace

Hofburg Imperial Palace

Hofburg Imperial Palace, or just “the Hofburg”, is a grand palace in Vienna and was under the ownership of the Austro-Hungarian Habsburg Dynasty until 1918, when it passed to the Austrian Republic.

Today it is a buzzing network of museums, restaurants and halls as well as the seat of the President of Austria.

Although the oldest, square parts of the building date back to the thirteenth century, Hofburg Imperial Palace became a residence of the emperors of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation from the fifteenth century and the seat of the Emperor of Austria from the early nineteenth century.

The oldest and most well preserved part of the Hofburg is its gothic chapel or ‘Burgkapelle’, where visitors can hear the Vienna boys’ choir sing on Sundays amidst its stunning architecture.

Hofburg Imperial Palace contains a wealth of architectural gems derived from a series of renovations and expansions carried out during the course of the Habsbergs’ ownership, including works by Filiberto Luchese, Lukas von Hildebrandt and Joseph Emanuel Fischer von Erlach, the latter of whom also designed parts of Schonbrunn Palace.

Hofburg Palace is now made up of a series of museums, such as the Sisi Museum, housing the imperial silver collection, the Euphesus Museum of neo-baroque architecture, the natural history museum and the collections of military armour.


Hofburg Imperial Palace

The Hofburg Palace is a must-see when visiting Vienna. The power-house of the Austrian empire, it holds a wealth of rich culture and history waiting to be explored. The Habsburg emperors built their imperial forum into one of the most lavish locations and now it stands as the official seat of the Austrian President. With a variety of museums such as the Imperial Treasury Vienna, art galleries and prestigious collections, there is plenty to be discovered.


Hofburg Imperial Palace

Originally a fortified castle, construction on the Hofburg Imperial Palace began around 1275 during the reign of King Ottokar Przemysl. A few decades later, the Habsburgs came to power. The palace structure expanded in 1533 and beyond as numerous generations of Habsburgs continued to make their own additions.

After defeating the Ottomans (1683) the Habsburgs gave the dull, fortress-like exterior of the old castle a baroque makeover. The Hofburg Imperial Palace is now 240,000m² and has18 wings, 19 courtyards and over 2,000 rooms. All the way until 1918, the Imperial Palace remained the residence and seat of government of the Habsburg emperors.

Must see statues at the Hofburg

There are many lovely and impressive statues to see, such as the bronze statue of Archduke Karl with flag in hand riding proudly on his horse, or that of Kaiser Franz I, a monument with several statues and Franz in the center. He is wearing his classical clothing, with a scepter in his left hand and a raised right hand as if greeting someone. There are many other important sculptures in nearby areas, such as Michaelerplatz.

Spanish Riding School

There are many excellent activities at Hofburg Palace you will not want to miss. One is visiting the Spanish Riding School, where you can watch the horses during their morning exercises. You can witness the riders leading the horses in strengthening activities while enjoying classical Viennese music.

Imperial Treasury

Another great activity is visiting the Imperial Treasury, the most important treasury in the world, and home to two imperial crowns (the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire and the Austrian imperial crown of Emperor Rudolf II), the Burgundian treasure, and the treasure of the Order of the Golden Fleece, which includes one of the world&rsquos largest emeralds.

Sisi Museum

Another fantastic idea is to visit the Sisi Museum, which contains hundreds of objects commemorating the life and times of Empress Elisabeth (Sisi), one of the most important figures in Viennese culture and history. And there are many other things to see and do as well!

Unforgettable experience

An unforgettable experience at Hofburg is to attend one of the local balls. Some of the balls include the Rudolfina Redoute, the Ball of the Legal Professionals, the Hofburg Ball of Viennese Business, the New Year&rsquos Eve Ball, and the Fête Impériale, most of which are quite popular with the locals.


The Hofburg Imperial Palace

The Hofburg Imperial Palace is the official residence of the Federal President of Austria. It has accommodated some of the most influential persons in Austrian history and is known as Habsburg’s winter residence during their dynasty.

It is historical for being the political center of monarchy in Austria. The rooms of the imperial palace had once been devoted to the revolutionary plans of reform by the late Emperor Joseph II. It had also witnessed functions for the Congress of Austria and catered to many different people for Emperor Franz Joseph. Its rich history is enough to make it a popular palace in Austria.

The world of the Habsburg, the most significant royal house in Austria, can be experienced in the Hofburg Imperial Palace. It is the home of the Imperial Silver Collection, the Sisi Museum, and the Imperial Apartments.

1. The Imperial Silver Collection. A range of objects that is necessary in the Imperial Household. It magnificently shows the culture of dining in the palace.

2. The Sisi Museum. If you want to take a peek at the world of the great Empress Elisabeth, you can visit the Sisi Museum and find most of the personal items that belonged to the queen.

The beautiful Empress was often misunderstood and has a great passion for traveling. The Sisi Museum is one of the places where you can find true insight and recollection of the historic icon, Empress Elisabeth.

3. The Imperial Apartments. It is an insight to the world of Austria’s most distinguished couple, Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth. It is also a showcase of the rooms that each member of Habsburg clan has occupied during their reign.

The home of the illustrious imperial dynasty of Austria, the Hofburg Imperial Palace gives you a taste of the country’s history, its culture, elegance, and fame.


Imperial Palace

The Imperial Palace was completed in the year 1500 under Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The palace was built to the same scale as is seen today and was captured as a watercolour by Albrecht Dürer. The painting shows a late Gothic courtyard with covered staircase, a Crest Tower and the women’s quarters (or “women’s rooms”). The reception area, which is known today as the “Gothic Cellar”, was built in the style of a large hall with columns and vaults. A “Kürnstube” (home to Maximilian’s hunting trophies), the “Silver chamber” (treasury) and the Festival Hall (with depictions of Hercules) are also reminders of the time.
The “Rennplatz” square in front of the Imperial Palace served as a competition arena to please the sports-loving Emperor.

Almost 250 years later, Maria Theresa (1717-1780) visited the Innsbruck palace and deemed it to be behind the times. There hadn’t been any Tyrolean princes since 1665 and the governor, who reigned Tyrol on behalf of the Emperor, lived in the governor’s quarters on the first floor. The representation rooms on the second floor, which were reserved for the Imperial family, were uninhabited. Maria Theresa arranged for the palace to be rebuilt in the Viennese late Baroque style and sent her best artists to Innsbruck: Konstantin von Walter and Nicolaus Parcassi. Martin van Meytens and his school and Franz Anton Maulbertsch were appointed for the interior. The renovations were interrupted by the Seven Years’ War and, therefore, only completed in the 1770s.

Maria Theresa decided to hold the wedding of her son Leopold (II) and Maria Ludovica von Bourbon in Innsbruck in 1765. Organising the celebration was quite a feat – everything needed to be arranged, from furniture to tableware. The wedding was held on 4 August and was a splendid celebration with 2000 guests (although the majority of these were “spectators”, meaning they weren’t catered for). The exuberant celebrations lasted 14 days and involved extravagant food, opera visits and much enjoyment. On 18 August 1765, the celebrations were brought to an abrupt end following the sudden passing of Emperor Francis I.
Maria Theresa went into deep mourning for her beloved husband: he was laid out in the Giant Hall according to customary Habsburg funeral ceremonies and later taken to Vienna by boat, where he was laid to rest in the Imperial Crypt.
Maria Theresa had the room where the Emperor died converted into a new chapel, had the Triumphal Arch built with one side dedicated to mourning and one side dedicated to the wedding and founded a convent where twelve noble Tyroleans were to pray for the dead Emperor for several hours each day. The latter survived the years and still exists today on a smaller scale.

In the 19th century, Archduke Karl Ludwig (1833-1896) was the governor in Innsbruck. During this time, he had the “Inner Apartment” refurbished for his sister-in-law Empress Elisabeth (Sisi). Furniture in the Second Rococo style by Viennese court artist August La Vigne was brought to Innsbruck and every room was decorated in a different colour. The furniture was adorned with exquisite silks, which also served as curtains and wall coverings. Elisabeth only stayed in Innsbruck a few times but her husband, Emperor Franz Joseph, was a frequent guest in Tyrol and stayed at the Imperial Palace.

Following the end of the monarchy (1918), former Imperial possessions became state property. Today, the Imperial Palace is the third most important historic building in Austria and is managed by the Burghauptmannschaft. The third and final part of the general restoration works was completed between 2006 and 2010. The palace is frequently used for high-profile events.

1. Staterooms (from the time of Maria Theresa)
GUARD HALL: Large battle scenes with Charles V of Lorraine (Ottoman Wars), the Imperial General and first Governor of Tyrol, married to Eleonore von Habsburg. Grandparents to Franz Stephan (Emperor Francis I).

GIANT HALL: the most important banquet hall in western Austria, celebrating the time of the Habsburgs: in commemoration of Maria Theresa, Francis Stephen of Lorraine and their 16 children (full-length portraits by Martin van Meytens and school), after 1765.
Ceiling frescoes by Franz Anton Maulbertsch from around 1770: “Unification of the Habsburg & Lorraine dynasties” and “Regalia of Tyrol”.
Still used as a banquet and events hall today.

COUNCIL CHAMBER: Features the three primary orders:Order of St Stephen, Order of the Golden Fleece, German Order

2. Imperial apartments: salon, beauty salon, study, dressing room, several bedrooms each decorated in different colours, furniture and interior decoration, second half of the 19th century.

3. Chapel and chapel vestibule, sacristy (from the time of Maria Theresa): features the wedding and death of 1765CHAPEL: second half of the 18th century, high Baroque sculpture group by FA Leittensdorffer

4. Crest tower (originally from the time of Maximilian), Crest Tower on the Court Church side, adorned with Emperor Maximilian I’s coat of arms, coated during the Baroque reconstruction (today a rounded corner tower).Dürer’s representations of the late Gothic Imperial Palace (facsimile), vertical plans


Imperial Apartments

The Hofburg was the residence of the Habsburgs for over 600 years and thus the centre of the Holy Roman Empire.

Silver Collection

The Silver Collection Museum gives visitors a fascinating insight into the culture of courtly dining in its various forms.

Further Reading

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Further information

Sisi Museum

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Aristocratic Life at the Imperial Palace

Hofburg Palace has been the heart of power in Vienna since 1279, so naturally it is rich with history that can’t be experienced anywhere else. Once the Habsburg’s winter residence, this massive palace complex now serves as the workplace and home of the President of Austria. However, visitors can still catch a glimpse of Hofburg Palace’s Imperial past the richly decorated Imperial apartments, the Sisi Museum, and the lavish silver collections are all open to guests who want to understand the palace’s rich history.

Founded in 2004, the Sisi Museum is dedicated to the enigmatic Empress Elisabeth. The wife of Emperor Franz Joseph, Elisabeth (called Sisi) was an unconventional and spirited woman who never quite fit in to courtly society in the capital. During her life she was the object of fascination, rumour, and admiration, and after her tragic death by assassination in 1898, the myth of Sisi only grew. Featuring over 300 hundred objects, this museum gives guests an insight into her eventful life and death while dismantling the myth in order to reveal the woman underneath.

Imperial Apartments Vienna Hofburg - Toilet and Gym Room of Empress Sisi

A lover of fashion, horseback riding, and travel, Sisi was known for her seemingly eccentric habits as well as her remarkable beauty it’s said that it took two hours just to comb her ankle-length hair. Today, visitors to the Imperial Apartments can see her dressing room for themselves, where Sisi sat every morning at 6 a.m. to begin her beauty rituals. This room has been carefully preserved, along with the other apartments that served the Habsburgs for 600 years. From Emperor Franz Joseph’s grand staircase, to his study, audience chamber, and conference room, visitors can see for themselves where Hapsburg history happened.

The Imperial apartments also show the more personal side of the Habsburgs, including their bedrooms, salons, and even Sisi’s exercise room. Walking through these rooms gives guests an intimate look into the luxurious daily lives of the Habsburgs. One aspect of this was the elaborate dinners made possible by Hofburg Palace’s massive silver collections. Guests can see the remarkably preserved silver chamber, which dates back to the 15 th century, to better understand the culture of courtly dining.

Hofburg Palace allows visitors a window into Austria’s Imperial past, giving guests the opportunity to understand the Habsburgs as people and rulers.

Sisi Museum in the Imperial Museum in Vienna


The lance (Ancient Greek: λόγχη , lonkhē) is mentioned in the Gospel of John (19:31–37), but not the Synoptic Gospels. The gospel states that the Romans planned to break Jesus' legs, a practice known as crurifragium, which was a method of hastening death during a crucifixion. Because it was the eve of The Sabbath (Friday sundown to Saturday sundown), the followers of Jesus needed to "entomb" him because of Sabbath laws. Just before they did so, they realized that Jesus was already dead and that there was no reason to break his legs ("and no bone will be broken"). To make sure that he was dead, a Roman soldier (named in extra-Biblical tradition as Longinus) stabbed him in the side.

One of the soldiers pierced his side with a lance (λόγχη) , and immediately there came out blood and water.John 19:34

The phenomenon of blood and water was considered a miracle by Origen. Catholics, while accepting the biological reality of blood and water as emanating from the pierced heart and body cavity of Christ, also acknowledge the allegorical interpretation: it represents one of the main key teachings/mysteries of the Church, and one of the main themes of the Gospel of Matthew, which is the homoousian interpretation adopted by the First Council of Nicaea, that "Jesus Christ was both true God and true man." The blood symbolizes his humanity, the water his divinity. A ceremonial evocation of this is found in a Catholic Mass: The priest pours a small amount of water into the wine before the consecration, an act which acknowledges Christ's humanity and divinity and recalls the issuance of blood and water from Christ's side on the cross. Saint Faustina Kowalska, a Polish nun whose advocacy and writings led to the establishment of the Divine Mercy devotion, also acknowledged the miraculous nature of the blood and water, explaining that the blood is a symbol of the divine mercy of Christ, while the water is a symbol of His divine compassion and of baptismal waters.

In most variants of the Orthodox Divine Liturgy, the priest lances the host (prosphoron) with a liturgical spear before it is divided in honor of the Trinity, the Theotokos (Virgin Mary), and various other remembrances. The deacon recites the relevant passage from the Gospel of John, along with sections of the Acts of the Apostles dealing with commemoration of the saints. Most of these pieces, set aside, become the antidoron to be distributed after the liturgy, a relic of the ancient agape of apostolic times, considered to be blessed but not consecrated or sanctified in the Western understanding. The main piece becomes The Lamb, the host that is consecrated on the altar and distributed to the faithful for Holy Communion.

The name of the soldier who pierced Christ's side with a lonchē is not given in the Gospel of John, but in the oldest known references to the legend, the apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus appended to late manuscripts of the 4th century Acts of Pilate, the soldier is identified as a centurion and called Longinus (making the spear's Latin name Lancea Longini).

A form of the name Longinus occurs on a miniature in the Rabula Gospels (conserved in the Laurentian Library, Florence), which was illuminated by one Rabulas in the year 586. In the miniature, the name LOGINOS (ΛΟΓΙΝΟϹ) is written in Greek characters above the head of the soldier who is thrusting his lance into Christ's side. This is one of the earliest records of the name, if the inscription is not a later addition. [1]

At least four major relics are claimed to be the Holy Lance or parts of it.

Rome Edit

A relic described as the Holy Lance in Rome is preserved beneath the dome of Saint Peter's Basilica, although the Catholic Church makes no claim as to its authenticity. The first historical reference to a lance was made by the pilgrim Antoninus of Piacenza (AD 570) in his descriptions of the holy places of Jerusalem, writing that he saw in the Basilica of Mount Zion "the crown of thorns with which Our Lord was crowned and the lance with which He was struck in the side", [2] : 18 [3] although there is uncertainty about the exact site to which he refers. [2] : 42 A lance is mentioned in the so-called Breviarius at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The alleged presence in Jerusalem of the relic is attested by Cassiodorus (c. 485–585) [4] [5] as well as by Gregory of Tours (c. 538–594), who had not actually been to Jerusalem.

In 615, Jerusalem was captured by the Persian forces of King Khosrau II (Chosroes II). According to the Chronicon Paschale, the point of the lance, which had been broken off, was given in the same year to Nicetas, who took it to Constantinople and deposited it in the church of Hagia Sophia, and later to the Church of the Virgin of the Pharos. This point of the lance, which was now set in an icon, was acquired by the Latin Emperor Baldwin II of Constantinople, who later sold it to Louis IX of France. The point of the lance was then enshrined with the crown of thorns in the Sainte Chapelle in Paris. During the French Revolution these relics were removed to the Bibliothèque Nationale but the point subsequently disappeared. [6]

As for the larger portion of the lance, Arculpus claimed he saw it at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre around 670 in Jerusalem, but there is otherwise no mention of it after the sack in 615. Some claim that the larger relic had been conveyed to Constantinople in the 8th century, possibly at the same time as the Crown of Thorns. At any rate, its presence at Constantinople seems to be clearly attested by various pilgrims, particularly Russians, and, though it was deposited in various churches in succession, it seems possible to trace it and distinguish it from the relic of the point. Sir John Mandeville declared in 1357 that he had seen the blade of the Holy Lance both at Paris and at Constantinople, and that the latter was a much larger relic than the former it is worth adding that Mandeville is not generally regarded as one of the Middle Ages' most reliable witnesses, and his supposed travels are usually treated as an eclectic amalgam of myths, legends and other fictions. "The lance which pierced Our Lord's side" was among the relics at Constantinople shown in the 1430s to Pedro Tafur, who added "God grant that in the overthrow of the Greeks they have not fallen into the hands of the enemies of the Faith, for they will have been ill-treated and handled with little reverence." [7]

Whatever the Constantinople relic was, it did fall into the hands of the Turks, and in 1492, under circumstances minutely described in Pastor's History of the Popes, the Sultan Bayezid II sent it to Pope Innocent VIII to encourage the pope to continue to keep his brother and rival Zizim (Cem Sultan) prisoner. At this time great doubts as to its authenticity were felt at Rome, as Johann Burchard records, [8] because of the presence of other rival lances in Paris (the point that had been separated from the lance), Nuremberg (see Holy Lance in Vienna below), and Armenia (see Holy Lance in Echmiadzin below). In the mid-18th century Pope Benedict XIV states that he obtained from Paris an exact drawing of the point of the lance, and that in comparing it with the larger relic in St. Peter's he was satisfied that the two had originally formed one blade. [9] This relic has never since left Rome, and its resting place is at Saint Peter's.

Vienna Edit

The Holy Lance in Vienna is displayed in the Imperial Treasury or Weltliche Schatzkammer (lit. Worldly Treasure Room) at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria. It is a typical winged lance of the Carolingian dynasty. [10] At different times, it was said to be the lance of Saint Maurice or that of Constantine the Great. [11] In the tenth century, the Holy Roman Emperors came into possession of the lance, according to sources from the time of Otto I (912–973). In 1000, Otto III gave Boleslaw I of Poland a replica of the Holy Lance at the Congress of Gniezno. In 1084, Henry IV had a silver band with the inscription "Nail of Our Lord" added to it. This was based on the belief that the nail embedded in the spear-tip was one that had been used for the Crucifixion of Jesus. It was only in the thirteenth century that the Lance became identified with that of Longinus, which had been used to pierce Christ's side and had been drenched in water and the blood of Christ. [10]

In 1273, the Holy Lance was first used in a coronation ceremony. Around 1350, Charles IV had a golden sleeve put over the silver one, inscribed Lancea et clavus Domini (Lance and nail of the Lord). In 1424, Sigismund had a collection of relics, including the lance, moved from his capital in Prague to his birthplace, Nuremberg, and decreed them to be kept there forever. This collection was called the Imperial Regalia (Reichskleinodien).

When the French Revolutionary army approached Nuremberg in the spring of 1796, the city councilors decided to remove the Reichskleinodien to Vienna for safe keeping. The collection was entrusted to a Baron von Hügel, who promised to return the objects once the threat was resolved. [11] However, the Holy Roman Empire was disbanded in 1806 and in the confusion, he sold the collection to the Habsburgs. [11] The city councilors asked for the return of the collection after the defeat of Napoleon’s army at the Battle of Waterloo, but the Austrian authorities refused. [11]

In Mein Kampf, Hitler wrote that the Imperial Insignia "were still preserved in Vienna and appeared to act as magical relics rather than as the visible guarantee of an everlasting bond of union. When the Habsburg State crumbled to pieces in 1918, the Austrian Germans instinctively raised an outcry for union with their German fatherland." [12] During the Anschluss, when Austria was annexed to Germany, the Nazis brought the Reichskleinodien to Nuremberg, where they displayed them during the September 1938 Party Congress. They then transferred them to the Historischer Kunstbunker, a bunker that had been built into some of the medieval cellars of old houses underneath Nuremberg Castle to protect historic art from air raids. [13]

Most of the Regalia were recovered by the Allies at the end of the war, but the Nazis had hidden the five most important pieces in hopes of using them as political symbols to help them rally for a return to power, possibly at the command of Nazi Commander Heinrich Himmler. [13] Walter Horn — a Medieval studies scholar who had fled Nazi Germany and served in the Third Army under General George S. Patton — became a special investigator in the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program after the end of the war, and was tasked with tracking the missing pieces down. [13] After a series of interrogations and false rumors, Nuremberg city councilor Stadtrat Fries confessed that he, fellow-councilman Stadtrat Schmeiszner, and an SS official had hidden the Imperial Regalia on March 31, 1945, and he agreed to bring Horn's team to the site. [13] On August 7, Horn and a U.S. army captain escorted Fries and Schmeiszner to the entrance of the Panier Platz Bunker, where they located the treasures hidden behind a wall of masonry in a small room off of a subterranean corridor, roughly eighty feet below ground. [13] The Regalia were first brought back to Nuremberg castle to be reunited with the rest of the Reichskleinodien, and then transferred with the entire collection to Austrian officials the following January. [13]

The Museum dated the Lance to the eighth century. [10] after Robert Feather, an English metallurgist and technical engineering writer, tested the lance for a documentary in January 2003. [11] [14] [15] He was given unprecedented permission not only to examine the lance in a laboratory environment, but to remove the delicate bands of gold and silver that hold it together. Based on X-ray diffraction, fluorescence tests, and other noninvasive procedures, he dated the main body of the spear to the 7th century at the earliest. [11] [15] Feather stated in the same documentary that an iron pin – long claimed to be a nail from the crucifixion, hammered into the blade and set off by tiny brass crosses – is "consistent" in length and shape with a 1st-century A.D. Roman nail. [15] There was no residue of human blood on the lance. [11]

Not long afterward, researchers at the Interdisciplinary Research Institute for Archeology in Vienna used X-ray and other technology to examine a range of lances, and determined that the Vienna Lance dates from around the 8th to the beginning of the 9th century, with the nail apparently being of the same metal, and ruled out a connection with the time of the first century AD. [16]

Vagharshapat Edit

A Holy Lance is conserved in Vagharshapat (previously known as Echmiadzin), the religious capital of Armenia. It was previously held in the monastery of Geghard. The first source that mentions it is a text Holy Relics of Our Lord Jesus Christ, in a thirteenth-century Armenian manuscript. According to this text, the spear which pierced Jesus was to have been brought to Armenia by the Apostle Thaddeus. The manuscript does not specify precisely where it was kept, but the Holy Lance gives a description that exactly matches the lance, the monastery gate, since the thirteenth century precisely, the name of Geghardavank (Monastery of the Holy Lance). [ clarification needed ]

In 1655, the French traveler Jean-Baptiste Tavernier was the first Westerner to see this relic in Armenia. In 1805, the Russians captured the monastery and the relic was moved to Tchitchanov Geghard, Tbilisi, Georgia. It was later returned to Armenia, and is still on display at the Manoogian museum in Vagharshapat, enshrined in a 17th-century reliquary.

Antioch Edit

During the June 1098 Siege of Antioch, a poor monk named Peter Bartholomew reported that he had a vision in which St. Andrew told him that the Holy Lance was buried in the Church of St. Peter in Antioch. After much digging in the cathedral, Bartholomew allegedly discovered a lance. Despite the doubts of many, including the papal legate Adhemar of Le Puy, the discovery of the Holy Lance of Antioch inspired the starving Crusaders to break the siege and secure the city. [17] In the 18th century, Roman cardinal Prospero Lambertini claimed the Antiochian lance was a fake.

Other lances Edit

Another lance has been preserved at Kraków, Poland, since at least the 13th century. The story told by William of Malmesbury of the giving of the Holy Lance to King Athelstan of England by Hugh Capet seems to be due to a misconception. [ citation needed ]

In his opera Parsifal, Richard Wagner identifies the Holy Spear with two items that appear in Wolfram von Eschenbach's medieval poem Parzival: a bleeding spear in the Castle of the Grail and the spear that has wounded the Fisher King. The opera's plot concerns the consequences of the spear's loss by the Knights of the Grail and its recovery by Parsifal. Having decided that the blood on the Spear was that of the wounded Saviour – Jesus is never named in the opera – Wagner has the blood manifest itself in the Grail rather than on the spearhead. [18]


Quick facts

Name The Hofburg
Type Palace complex/Museums
Built/opened 13th century
Location Michaelerkuppel, 1010 Wien, 1st district, Innere Stadt
How to get there This attraction is in the city center and is reachable on foot.
Ticket Price From $20, depends on the tour
Opening hours 7 days a week, 10:00-17:00
Official website https://www.hofburg-wien.at/en/

Originally built as a fortified palace, The Hofburg was being expanded through centuries and now it is a palace complex with 18 wings, 19 courtyards and 2,600 rooms totaling over 240,000 m² and with almost 5,000 people who work and live there.

Most visited parts of Hofburg are Sisi Museum, Imperial Apartments and Silver Collection. The palace is also famous for hosting excellent classical music concerts.


Where the Baroque comes to life for the whole family

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_ga: Used to distinguish users. Expiration: 2 years. Type: Google Analytics.

_gid: Used to distinguish users. Expiration: 24 hours. Type: Google Analytics.

_gat: Used to throttle request rate. If Google Analytics is deployed via Google Tag Manager, this cookie will be named _dc_gtm_<property-id>. Expiration: 1 minute. Type: Google Analytics

collect: Used to send data to Google Analytics about the visitor's device and behaviour. Tracks the visitor across devices and marketing channels. Expiration: Session. Type: Google Analytics.


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