Oyster Bay AGP-6 - History

Oyster Bay AGP-6 - History

Oyster Bay
(AGP-6: dp. 2,592; 1. 310'9"; b. 41'1"; dr. 13'6"; s. 18.2 k.; cpl. 333; a. 2 5"; cl. Barnegat)

Oyster Bay (AGP-6) was laid down as AVP-28 on 17 April 1942 at Lake Washington Shipyard, Houghton, Wash.

aunehed 7 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. William K. Harrill; Reclassified AGP-6 on 1 May 1943, and commissioned 17 November 1943, Lt. Comdr. W. Holroyd, USNR, in command.

Oyster Bay departed Seattle 7 December for shakedown at San Diego, and got underway from San Diego 2 January 1944 steaming to Brisbane en route to Milne Bay for tender operations. Oyster Bay serviced 2 squadrons of motor torpedo boats from 28 February and, on 9 March, got underway escorting 15 PT boats to Seeadler Harbor, Admiralty Islands.

The spring was an active one for Oyster Bay. On 14 March she bombarded the enemy shore installations on Pityilu Islan] for the Army; on the 20th she was underway for Langemak, New Guinea, with 42 wounded soldiers for evacuation to Base Hospital, Finsehhafen. After returning to Seeadler Harbor on the 31st, she bombarded Ndrilo Island to the east of Seeadler Harbor preparatory to the landing there by Army ground forces.

Oyster Bay shifted to Dreger Harbor 19 April. Allied forces moved on Aitape the 22nd, and on the 24th, two days after D-day, Oyster Bay departed for the area with 15 PT boats. Japanese planes attacked the convoy on the 27th, but, while 1 boat was hit, Oyster Bay escaped damage. In May, the ship proceeded to Hollandia, an area of heated Allied action. Air raid alerts were frequent, but no attacks ensued. Oyster Bay got underway to Wakde Island 5 June with 2 squadrons of PT boats. After Allied forces had invaded this island to eapture a major Japanese air base 17 May, the Japanese continued to hammer away at the newly acquired airstrip. Later in June,

Oyster Bay bombarded shore installations on the Wieki River and at Samar Village, preparatory to Army attacks.

Leaving Mios Woendi Island 12 July, the ship reported to Brisbane for availability. A R.A.F. plane struck the top of the ship's mast, carried away her antennae and dama~red her navigation lights 22 July, but hasty repairs permitted Oyster Bay to depart for Mios Woendi 16 August.

The tender then steamed on to Morotai, needed as a staging area for the Philippine campaign. As the beaches were assaulted in October, Oyster Bay set out for Leyte Gulf. The enemy planes let loose but U.S. Navy planes and anti aircraft fire took a heavy toll.

In November, Oyster Bay went to general quarters 221 times, but w~s not Dttacked. Shc ~ifted to San Juanico Strmis the 21st and three days later, while taking on gas, the ship was attacked by two Kates that were driven off by heavy AA fire. Two Zekes dived on the ship the 26th, but intense AAfire splashed both.

In January 1945, Oyster Bay got underway for Hollandiathenee returned to Leyte Gulf for tender operations 8 Feb, wary. Departing for the invasion of Zamboanga 6 March she arrived two days before D-day and remained with the bombardment group until the landings. Oyster Bay next rendezvoused with PT boats in Sarangani Bay, Mindoro 24 April and supported them during night raids against the Japanese positions in Davao Gulf. In May, Oyster Bay reported to Leyte Gulf, thence steaming to Samar. She departed 18 May for Tawi Tawi, where she continued tender operations until she returned to Guinan Harbor 6 August.

The ship turned homeward 10 November and steamed into San Francisco Bay the 29th. Decommiasioning 26 March 1946, the ship was struck from the Naval Vea el Register 12 April 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Comm~ssion 12 August 1946. The ship returned to the Navy 3 January 1949 was re-designated AVP-28, 16 March 1949, and was berthed at Stoekton, where she remained in the Pacific Reserve Fleet until 1957. She was transferred to the Government of Italy 23 October 1957 as Pietro Cauezzale (A-5301).

Oyster Bay received 5 battle stars for World War II service.


From 1957 to 1993, the former Oyster Bay served in the Italian Navy as the special forces tender Pietro Cavezzale (A 5301) .

Oyster Bay was laid down as a Barnegat-class small seaplane tender designated AVP-28 at Lake Washington Shipyard, Houghton Washington, on April 17, 1942, and was launched on September 7, 1942, sponsored by Mrs. William K. Harrill. On May 1, 1943, she was reclassified as a motor torpedo tender and redesignated AGP𔃄 and, accordingly, completed to a modified design to allow her to fulfill this new role. She was commissioned on November 17, 1943, with Lieutenant Commander Walter W. Holroyd, USNR, in command.

Oyster Bay departed Seattle, Washington, on December 7, 1943, for shakedown at San Diego, California, which lasted for the remainder of 1943.


Laststandonzombieisland

USS Oyster Bay (AGP-6) anchored in Leyte Gulf, late 1944 with PT boats alongside

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blogs I Follow

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Celebrating the Past, Present and Future of Navy Cryptology

Official site for National Guard marksmanship training & competitions

Better to stay out of trouble than to get out of trouble.

The U.S. Navy and the Western Pacific

News and views from The Writer in Black

World War 2 Historian, Relic Hunter and expert in identification of WW2 relics

Mission Ready, Qualified & Competent, On Time Execution!

Exploring History with the National Archives Special Media Division

Writing about whatever interests me, and maybe you.

Commentary on Gun Control & Crime

Identifying the Best Training, Tools, and Tactics for the Armed Civilian!

A Site for the British Empire 1860-1913

Military wings and things

The Mechanix of Auto, Aviation, Military. pert near anything I feel relates to mechanical things, places, events or whatever I happen to like. Even non-mechanical artsy-fartsy stuff.


Tuesday, March 18, 2008

USS Phoenix (CL-46)


Figure 1: Pearl Harbor Raid, December 7, 1941. USS Phoenix (CL-46) steams down the channel off Ford Island's "Battleship Row", past the sunken and burning USS West Virginia (BB-48), at left, and USS Arizona (BB-39), at right. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Phoenix (CL-46) firing her 6"/47 guns during the pre-invasion bombardment of Cape Gloucester, New Britain, circa 24-26 December 1943. Photographed from the ship's fantail, looking forward. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Phoenix (right) screening escort carriers (CVE) off Leyte, 30 October 1944. Photographed from one of the CVEs. Note flight deck barriers rigged in the foreground. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: Port bow view of ARA General Belgrano (ex-USS Phoenix) sometime prior to her sinking in 1982. Photo from NavSource Online: Cruiser Photo Archive. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: General Belgrano sinking after having been attacked by the British submarine HMS Conqueror on 2 May 1982 during the Falklands war. Note that the ship’s bow has been blown off by one of the HMS Conqueror’s torpedoes. Photo courtesy of Gerhard L. Mueller-Debus. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: General Belgrano sinking after having been attacked by the British submarine HMS Conqueror on 2 May 1982 during the Falklands war. Photo courtesy of Robert Hurst. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 7: General Belgrano sinking after having been attacked by the British submarine HMS Conqueror on 2 May 1982 during the Falklands war. Photo courtesy of Robert Hurst. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after the capital of Arizona, the 9,575-ton USS Phoenix (CL-46) was a Brooklyn class light cruiser that was built at the New York Shipbuilding Company in Camden, New Jersey, and was commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 3 October 1938. The ship was approximately 608 feet long and 61 feet wide, had a top speed of over 33 knots and a crew of 868 officers and men. The Phoenix was armed with 15 6-inch guns, eight 5-inch guns, and 8 .50-caliber machine guns, although additional smaller-caliber guns were added during the war.

After an initial shakedown cruise that took her along the Atlantic Coast of South America, the Phoenix returned to Philadelphia in January 1939. She was then transferred to the Pacific Fleet and was based at Pearl Harbor. On the morning of December 7, 1941, the Phoenix was anchored peacefully at Pearl Harbor just to the southeast of Ford Island, next to the hospital ship Solace. Lookouts on board the Phoenix spotted the Japanese planes coming in low over Ford Island and sounded the alarm. The Phoenix went to “Battle Stations” and soon the ship’s guns were firing at the Japanese planes. Miraculously, the Phoenix was unharmed during the attack and was able to raise steam. She left Pearl Harbor shortly after noon and joined the light cruisers St. Louis (CL-49) and Detroit (CL-8), along with several destroyers, in a spontaneous search for the Japanese task force. It is fortunate that they did not locate the enemy because it seems doubtful that three light cruisers and a handful of destroyers would have lasted long against the enormous Japanese task force, which possessed several aircraft carriers and a large number of escorts.

The Phoenix spent the first month of the war escorting ships between Hawaii and the West Coast. The ship was then sent to Australia, where she was based throughout 1942 and much of 1943. During this time, the Phoenix witnessed the horrible Allied defeat in the Dutch East Indies, escorted convoys in the Indian Ocean and the South Pacific, and worked with US and Australian naval forces along the coast of New Guinea. On 26 December 1943, the Phoenix, along with the light cruiser USS Nashville (CL-43), bombarded the Cape Gloucester area of New Britain in New Guinea for nearly four hours, destroying numerous Japanese targets. The Phoenix also provided fire support for the Allied landing on New Britain, eliminating enemy targets that had not been destroyed during the initial bombardment. On the night of 25-26 January 1944, the Phoenix also took part in a night raid that shelled Japanese shore installations on Madang and Alexishafen, New Guinea.

For the rest of the war, the Phoenix was attached to the US Seventh Fleet in the Pacific. From March to September 1944, she took part in the Allied invasions of the Admiralty Islands, the Northern and Western coasts of New Guinea, and the island of Morotai. In addition to her duties of escorting convoys and invasion task forces, as well as providing fire support against enemy shore targets, the Phoenix also assisted in the pursuit of a group of Japanese destroyers on the night of 8-9 June that were trying to bring reinforcements to the island of Biak. None of the Japanese ships were sunk because they quickly retreated after making contact with the Phoenix and the other American warships that were steaming with her.

The Phoenix then took part in the enormous invasion of the Philippine Islands. The Phoenix was assigned to the landing on Leyte and she bombarded the beaches there before the successful Allied landing on 20 October 1944. Her guns demolished Japanese coastal targets and provided invaluable fire support to American troops that landed on shore. On the night of 24-25 October, the Phoenix also took part in the famous Battle of Surigao Strait, in which American naval forces under the command of Admiral Jesse Oldendorf faced the Japanese “Southern Force” under the command of Admiral Shoji Nishimura. The Phoenix fired four spotting salvoes and, when the fourth salvo hit its target, the ship began firing all of its 6-inch guns. The enemy warship the Phoenix was firing at turned out to be the Japanese battleship Fuso, which sank in 27 minutes after being pounded by the Phoenix and the other ships in her task force. During the battle the Japanese lost another battleship and three destroyers. A Japanese cruiser was also damaged during the battle and was sunk the next day by American aircraft. Admiral Nishimura was killed during the confrontation, which turned out to be one of the last major surface battles in naval history.

The Phoenix continued serving off the coast of the Philippines for several more months, fighting off numerous Japanese air attacks and bombarding shore targets in support of American assaults on Mindoro, Lingayen Gulf, and Manila Bay. From May to July 1945, the Phoenix also assisted in the landings on Borneo.

When the war in the Pacific ended on August 1945, the Phoenix was steaming back to the United States for an overhaul. She reached the Panama Canal on 6 September and, after transiting the canal, was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. She was placed in reserve at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 28 February 1946 and was decommissioned on 3 July 1946. The Phoenix received nine battle stars for her service in World War II.

The Phoenix remained in Philadelphia in “mothballs” until 9 April 1951, when she was transferred to Argentina. The ship was renamed the 17 de Octubre and re-commissioned into the Argentinean Navy on 17 October 1951. In 1956 the ship was renamed yet again and called the General Belgrano. The ship served Argentina for more than 30 years, but on 2 May 1982, the Belgrano’s luck ran out. During the war with Great Britain over the Falkland Islands, the General Belgrano was torpedoed by the HMS Conqueror, a British nuclear-powered submarine. The Belgrano was hit by two Mk. 8 torpedoes (which were designed in the 1920s) and the order to “abandon ship” was given approximately 20 minutes after the attack. Shortly after that the ship rolled over and sank, taking 323 men with her. Approximately 770 men were eventually rescued by nearby Argentinean ships. The General Belgrano was the only ship ever to have been sunk by a nuclear-powered submarine.

No doubt the USS Phoenix had an amazing career. She managed to survive the attack on Pearl Harbor and the entire war in the Pacific, as well as one of the largest naval confrontations in naval history, the Battle of Surigao Strait. She also went on to serve the Argentinean Navy for more than 30 years before meeting her violent end in the South Atlantic in 1982. It does seem ironic that a nuclear-powered submarine sank a cruiser that was built before World War II using a torpedo that was also designed prior to World War II. But those are the types of ironies that make naval history eerie as well as intriguing.


World War II service

New Guinea campaign

Oyster Bay got underway from San Diego on 2 January 1944, steaming to Brisbane, Australia, en route Milne Bay, New Guinea, for motor torpedo boat tender operations in support of the New Guinea campaign. She serviced two squadrons of motor torpedo boats beginning on 28 February 1944 and, on 9 March 1944, got underway escorting 15 patrol torpedo boats (PT boats) to Seeadler Harbor in the Admiralty Islands.

The spring of 1944 was an active one for Oyster Bay. On 14 March 1944, she bombarded the Japanese shore installations on Pityilu Island in support of the United States Army. On 20 March 1944 she was underway for Langemak , New Guinea, with 42 wounded soldiers for evacuation to Base Hospital, Finschhafen, New Guinea. After returning to Seeadler Harbor on 31 March 1944, she bombarded Ndrilo Island to the east of Seeadler Harbor preparatory to the landing there by U.S. Army ground forces.

Oyster Bay shifted to Dreger Harbor on 19 April 1944. Allied forces moved on Aitape on 22 April 1944, and on 24 April 1944, two days after the landings at Aitape, Oyster Bay departed for the area with 15 PT boats. Japanese planes attacked the convoy on 27 April 1944, but, while one PT boat was hit, Oyster Bay escaped damage.

In May 1944, Oyster Bay proceeded to Hollandia, an area of heated Allied action. Air raid alerts were frequent, but no Japanese attacks ensued. Oyster Bay got underway to Wakde Island on 5 June 1944 with two squadrons of PT boats. After Allied forces had invaded Wakde Island on 17 May 1944 to capture a major Japanese air base there, the Japanese continued to hammer away at the newly acquired airstrip. Later in June 1944, Oyster Bay bombarded shore installations on the Wicki River and at Samar Village , preparatory to U.S. Army attacks.

Leaving Mios Woendi Island on 12 July 1944, Oyster Bay reported to Brisbane for shipyard availability. A British Royal Air Force plane struck the top of the ship’s mast, carried away her antennae and damaged her navigation lights on 22 July 1944, but hasty repairs permitted Oyster Bay to depart for Mios Woendi on 16 August 1944.

Philippines campaign

Oyster Bay then steamed on to Morotai , needed as a staging area for the Philippines campaign. As the Allies assaulted the beaches of Leyte Island in the Philippines in October 1944, Oyster Bay set out for Leyte Gulf. Japanese planes counterattacked, but U.S. Navy planes and anti-aircraft fire took a heavy toll of them. In November 1944, Oyster Bay went to general quarters 221 times, but was not attacked. She shifted to San Juanico Strait on 21 November 1944 and on 24 November 1944, while taking on gasoline, she was attacked by two Nakajima B5N "Kate" torpedo bombers that were driven off by heavy antiaircraft fire. Two Mitsubishi A6M "Zeke" fighters dived on Oyster Bay on the 26 November 1944, but intense antiaicraft fire shot them both down.

In January 1945, Oyster Bay got underway for Hollandia, then returned to Leyte Gulf for motor torpedo boat tender operations on 8 February 1945. Departing for the invasion of Zamboanga on 6 March 1945, she arrived two days before the invasion and remained with the bombardment group until the landings. Oyster Bay next rendezvoused with PT boats in Sarangani Bay at Mindoro on 24 April 1945 and supported them during night raids against the Japanese positions in Davao Gulf. In May 1945, Oyster Bay reported to Leyte Gulf, thence steaming to Samar. She departed on 18 May 1945 for Tawi Tawi, where she continued motor torpedo boat tender operations until she returned to Guinan Harbor on 6 August 1945.

Awards

Oyster Bay received five battle stars for World War II service.


Oyster Bay AGP-6 - History

The Navy's Class Barnegat AVP-10 HULL DESIGN
was used for the (4) ships classified Motor Torpedo Boat Tender


AVP-28 Oyster Bay, / AGP-6 (Torpedo boat tender) Launched 1942
Photo PT boats December 1944
To Italy as Pietro Cavezale (A 5301) 1957 - Scrapped 1994
Oyster Bay HISTORY

To Vietnam as Ngo Kuyen (HQ 06) 1972
To the Philippines as Gregorio de Pilar (PF 8) 1975
Struck 1986
Wachapreague HISTORY



USS
Wachapreague AVP-56
Photo Lake Washington 20 May 1944
The photo above was taken on the stern of this ship.


Contents

The first mention of Oyster Bay comes from Dutch Captain David Peterson de Vries, who in his journal recalls how on June 4, 1639, he "came to anchor in Oyster Bay, which is a large bay which lies on the north side of the Great Island… There are fine oysters here, whence our nation has given it the name of Oyster Bay."

Oyster Bay was settled by the Dutch, and was the boundary between the Dutch New Amsterdam colony and the English New England colonies. The English, under Peter Wright, first settled in the area in 1653. The boundary between the Dutch and English was somewhat fluid which led to each group having their own Main Street. Many Quakers came to Oyster Bay, escaping persecution from Dutch authorities in New Amsterdam. These included Elizabeth Feake and her husband Captain John Underhill, whom she converted to Quakerism. Other notable Quakers to settle in Oyster Bay were the brothers John Townsend and Henry Townsend. Noted dissenter and founder of Quakerism George Fox visited Oyster Bay in 1672, where he spoke with the Wrights, Underhill and Feake at a Quaker gathering on the site of Council Rock, facing the Mill Pond. [1]

During the Revolutionary War, Raynham Hall was owned by the irredentist Townsend family. For a six-month period from 1778 to 1779, the Townsend home served as British headquarters for the Queen's Rangers led by Lt. Col. John Graves Simcoe. Simcoe was often visited by British officer Major John Andre. According to legend, on one of these visits Samuel Townsend's daughter Sally Townsend overheard the two officers discussing Benedict Arnold's traitorous plot to surrender the fort at West Point to the British. [ clarification needed ] The plot was thwarted when three Americans on patrol captured Andre near West Point, preventing what would have been a disastrous defeat for the colonists in the Revolutionary War.

In the 1880s, the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) extended rail service from Locust Valley as a means to establish a connection between New York and Boston, via steamboat on Long Island Sound. On June 21, 1889, the first LIRR train arrived in Oyster Bay. In the following year, service commenced with the train coaches being loaded onto a ferry for a connection to the New Haven Railroad at Norwalk, CT. Service lasted less than a year. [2] Around the time railroad service was introduced, Theodore Roosevelt, the future 26th President of the United States, chose to make his home at Sagamore Hill, in present-day Cove Neck, a neighboring incorporated village (Cove Neck was not incorporated until 1927). Sagamore Hill was completed in 1886. This is where Roosevelt lived until his death in 1919. His wife Edith Roosevelt continued to occupy the house until her death, nearly three decades later, in September 1948. On July 25, 1962, Congress established the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site to preserve the house.

Efforts to honor Theodore Roosevelt in Oyster Bay have greatly improved the hamlet. These include design of the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park. Other Roosevelt-related landmarks have been restored including Snouder's Drug Store - location of the first telegraph in Oyster Bay, Moore's Building - today the Wild Honey restaurant, and proposals to restore the Oyster Bay Long Island Rail Road Station - home station of TR and the Octagon Hotel - built in 1851 and once home to offices of Governor Roosevelt. A local non-profit, the Oyster Bay Main Street Association, developed an audio tour of these historic sites and many others called the Oyster Bay History Walk.

The oysters that give the bay its name are now the only source of traditionally farmed oysters from Long Island, providing up to 90% of all the oysters harvested in New York State.

Hurricane Sandy hit Oyster Bay in 2012, where West Shore Road was demolished. Due to the damages, commuters between Bayville and Oyster Bay must take a detour through Mill Neck, on-and-off for 4 years.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km 2 ), of which 1.2 square miles (3.1 km 2 ) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km 2 ) (23.60%) is water.

For the 2000 census, the CDP was enlarged beyond the boundaries used for the 1990 census. [4]

2010 Census Edit

As of the 2010 Census [5] the population was 85% White 75.8% Non-Hispanic White, 3.3% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 2.9% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 5.4% from other races, and 3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.7% of the population.

2000 Census Edit

As of the census [6] of 2000, there were 6,826 people, 2,815 households, and 1,731 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 5,554.1 per square mile (2,142.7/km 2 ). There were 2,898 housing units at an average density of 2,358.0/sq mi (909.7/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.51% White, 3.16% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.76% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.17% from other races, and 2.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.25% of the population.

There were 2,815 households, out of which 26.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.5% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the CDP, the population was spread out, with 20.7% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 32.3% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $57,993, and the median income for a family was $73,500. Males had a median income of $51,968 versus $41,926 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $34,730. About 3.3% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.5% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.

Oyster Bay is known for the residence and summer White House of Theodore Roosevelt, Sagamore Hill (though that residence is in a nearby area known since 1927 as the Village of Cove Neck).

Many well-known American celebrities spent their youth in this town among its better known former residents are musician Billy Joel, tennis players John McEnroe and his brother Patrick, the Hirsch family, actress Heather Matarazzo, William Woodward Originator of Cinorama, The Barkin Family, authors Thomas Pynchon and Tracy Kidder, basketball coach Rick Pitino of Bayville, who attended St. Dominic's School here, and Sonic Youth guitarist Lee Ranaldo (Matarazzo, Pynchon and Ranaldo attended Oyster Bay High School). A less distinguished figure from the hamlet's past is Typhoid Mary, whose contagiousness was discovered following an investigation into her employment at a summer home in Oyster Bay in 1906. Composer John Barry lived in Oyster Bay until his death in 2011. William Woodward Jr., accidental victim of 1955's "Shooting of the Century" that was the subject of Dominic Dunne's book and NBC's The Two Mrs. Grenvilles was also a resident of Oyster Bay.


Oyster Bay AGP-6 - History

USS Oyster Bay , a 1,760-ton motor torpedo boat tender, was built at Houghton, Washington, and was commissioned in November 1943. Launched as a Barnegat class small seaplane tender (AVP-28) in September 1942, she was designated for conversion to a PT boat tender and reclassified AGP-6 in May 1943. She departed San Diego in January 1944 for the Southwest Pacific and tended PT boat squadrons in the forward area almost continuously through the end of the war.

Commencing her service at Milne Bay, she served in numerous operations in the New Guinea area, supporting her PT boats and, on at least one occasion, providing gunfire support for army troops ashore. In October 1944 Oyster Bay moved to Leyte Gulf as part of the Philippine campaign. She participated in operations at several locations in the Philippines and continued to tend PT boats there for the remainder of the war. She departed the Philippines in November 1945 for inactivation at San Francisco. She was decommissioned in March 1946, stricken from the Navy List in April, and transferred to the Maritime Commission for sale in August.

Oyster Bay was reacquired from the Maritime Commission in January 1949, reinstated on the Navy List in February, and reclassified AVP-28 in March. She remained in reserve until 1957, when she was reactivated for transfer to Italy. During this refit she was given a large seaplane crane and a single 3"/50 gun. Transferred in October 1957, she became the Italian special forces tender Pietro Cavezzale . She served in the Italian Navy for over 35 years, finally being decommissioned in October 1993 and scrapped in February 1996.

This page features all our views of USS Oyster Bay .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed off the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 28 November 1943, shortly after commissioning.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 74KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Photographed off the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 28 November 1943, shortly after commissioning.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 69KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Photographed off the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 28 November 1943, shortly after commissioning.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 88KB 740 x 625 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Tending PT boats in Seeadler Harbor, Admiralty Islands, on 25 March 1944.

Photograph from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 76KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Tending PT boats in Leyte Gulf in October or November 1944.
The boat approaching at the right is PT-357 .

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 585 pixels

Anchored in Leyte Gulf in December 1944 with PT boats alongside.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 74KB 740 x 625 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Fitting out at the Lake Washington Shipyard, Houghton, Washington, on 10 July 1943.
The unit outboard with part of her funnel on deck is probably USS Orca (AVP-49). The unit in the lower left is USS Oyster Bay (AGP-6), and the unit in the lower right with the crane is USS Mobjack (AGP-7). The old paddle-wheel ferry is named West Seattle .

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 121KB 740 x 625 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Oyster Bay (AGP-6). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


USS Oyster Bay (AGP-6 and AVP-28)


Figure 1: USS Oyster Bay (AGP-6) photographed off the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 28 November 1943, shortly after commissioning. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Oyster Bay photographed off the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 28 November 1943, shortly after commissioning. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Oyster Bay anchored in Leyte Gulf in December 1944 with PT boats alongside. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: USS Oyster Bay tending PT boats in Seeadler Harbor, Admiralty Islands, on 25 March 1944. Photograph from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Oyster Bay tending PT boats in Leyte Gulf in October or November 1944. The boat approaching at the right is PT-357. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Originally launched on 7 September 1942 at the Lake Washington Shipyard in Houghton, Washington, as a 1,760-ton Barnegat-class seaplane tender (AVP-28), the USS Oyster Bay was designated for conversion to a PT boat tender and reclassified AGP-6 in May 1943. The ship was commissioned on 17 November 1943 with a crew of 333 officers and men. The Oyster Bay was approximately 310 feet long and 41 feet wide, had a top speed of 18 knots, and was armed with two 5-inch guns (as well as an assortment of smaller caliber guns).

After a shakedown cruise off the coast of San Diego, the Oyster Bay headed for the Southwest Pacific on 2 January 1944. She stopped at Brisbane, Australia, and then went on to serve as a PT boat tender in Milne Bay, New Guinea. The Oyster Bay assisted two motor torpedo boat squadrons in February and on 9 March escorted 15 PT boats to Seeadler Harbor in the Admiralty Islands. On 14 March, the Oyster Bay bombarded enemy shore installations for the Army on Pityilu Island and on 20 March she steamed towards Langemak, New Guinea, with 42 wounded soldiers for evacuation to a hospital in Finschhafen. The Oyster Bay also bombarded Ndrilo Island to the east of Seeadler Harbor in preparation for a landing there by US Army troops.

The Oyster Bay usually tended to roughly 15 PT boats. She did this in Dreger Harbor, New Guinea, on 19 April 1944 and then proceeded to Hollandia in May. The Oyster Bay and her PT boats then moved to Wakde Island on 5 June, after Allied forces invaded the island to take a major Japanese air base there. Once again, the Oyster Bay assisted Army troops by bombarding shore installations on the Wicki River and at Samar Village.

In October 1944, the Oyster Bay was sent to Leyte Gulf to take part in the invasion of the Philippines. On 24 November, two Japanese planes attacked the Oyster Bay while she was being supplied with gas. The planes, though, were driven off by heavy anti-aircraft fire. Two days later, another pair of Japanese aircraft attacked the ship, but this time both planes were shot down. The Oyster Bay took part in operations at several locations in the Philippines and continued her duties there as a PT boat tender until the end of the war.

On 10 November 1945, the Oyster Bay left the Philippines and headed for home, arriving in San Francisco on 29 November. She was decommissioned on 26 March 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Commission on 12 August 1946. The ship was returned to the Navy on 3 January 1949, was re-designated AVP-28 on 16 March 1949, and was placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet until October 1957, when she was transferred to the Italian Navy. The Oyster Bay was converted into a special forces tender and was renamed the Pietro Cavezzale. She served in the Italian Navy for more than 35 years, finally being decommissioned in October 1993 and scrapped in February 1996.

PT boat tenders received very little recognition throughout the war, even though they were given the important task of providing maintenance and repair facilities to PT boats in very isolated areas. Always close to the fighting, these tenders (as in the case of the Oyster Bay) sometimes provided gunfire support, but they were also prime targets for enemy aircraft. They were a welcome sight to many damaged PT boats and they enabled these small but very active warships to remain on station for long periods of time. The Oyster Bay not only performed these duties incredibly well, but her career also spanned 50 years, which is, in and of itself, a remarkable achievement.


The incredible life of David Carll and his five generations who've raised families on his property

OYSTER BAY, New York -- Interwoven in the history of Oyster Bay, NY, a hamlet on the North Shore of Long Island, are untold stories of African Americans that have played significant roles in shaping the fabric of the town.

The incredible life of David Carll is one of these stories and his great-great-grandchildren Denise Evans-Sheppard, Actress and Singer Vanessa Williams, Iris Williams, and Francis Carl are sharing that story in celebration of Black History Month.

"David Carll was born a free man right out outside of Cold Springs, New York, and ended up residing in Oyster Bay," said Vanessa Williams.

As a free man, he did not turn a blind eye to the culture that surrounded him. In Oyster Bay, there were African American men, women, and children that were enslaved and he wanted everyone to experience the same freedoms that he had.

When a colored regiment was established in the State of New York, David Carll enlisted into the Civil War and was assigned to the 26th United States Colored regiment. He understood his responsibility to ensure the freedom of all.

"When it was time for him to come home from the Civil War, $300 bounty was given to any person that enlisted. David Carll purchased property and that is when Carll Hill was built," said Denise Evans-Sheppard, Executive Director of the Oyster Bay Historical Society.

Since its purchase in 1865, five generations have raised families on the property. 'Carll Hill' has served as the backdrop for family gatherings and a constant reminder of the incredible legacy of David Carll.

Through the family's extensive research of the life of David Carll, they came across his pension file, a written document about his experience in the Civil War at the National Archive in Washington, DC.

This document allowed the family to visually see the man that they had heard about for all of these years.

"As Black people in the United States, we don't have the opportunities at times to see photos of us in the 1800s that we can say those are our family members," said Vanessa Williams.

This discovery was a pivotal point for the family. Not only did they have the property as evidence of his contributions to society, now they can see the man himself.

In July 2018, Pine Hollow Cemetery, the final resting place of David Carll, was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The land is owned by the Hood African Methodist Episcopal Zionist Church of Oyster Bay, New York.

"We have a lot of shoulders to stand on, said Francis Carl. "David Carll is the most courageous man that I know of."

Oyster Bay is home to many unsung heroes and David Carll is one for the history books. His legacy is a big beautiful family that will continue to make him proud.


Watch the video: AGP 6