Riverland Community College

Riverland Community College

Riverland Community College, a three-campus consortium based in Albert Lea, Minnesota, is a regional comprehensive community college that provides a personalized educational environment for its students.Apart from being a leaders in liberal arts and career-technical higher education, and an essential link to economic and social vitality, the college also is honored for its excellence in learning through innovation, responsiveness, resourcefulness, and collaboration.Riverland Community College is a member of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities. The other campuses are located in Austin and Owatonna, Minnesota.The college runs a training and development division that works in concert with local business and industry to assess employees' needs, and also train them. It also conducts management education Programs to help students learn business and financial management, and achieve their business goals.Riverland Community College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.It also has won accreditation for individual college programs, being accredited by the National League for Nursing, Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, and the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association.


List of colleges and universities in Minnesota

There are nearly 200 post-secondary institutions in the U.S. state of Minnesota. [1] The Twin Cities campus of the public University of Minnesota is the largest university in the state with 51,721 enrolled for fall 2010, making it the sixth-largest American campus by enrollment size. [2] The University of Minnesota system has four other campuses in Crookston, Duluth, Morris, and Rochester. [3] The Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system (Minnesota State system), which does not include the University of Minnesota, comprises 37 public universities and colleges on 54 campuses. [4]

The University of St. Thomas in St. Paul is Minnesota's largest private university or college [5] with a fall 2010 enrollment of 10,815 students. [6] Center City-based Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies is the state's smallest postsecondary institution, while Century College in White Bear Lake is Minnesota's largest community and technical college. [7]

While the University of Minnesota was chartered by the state in 1851, it did not operate as a place of higher education for nearly two decades. [10] St. Paul-based Hamline University is considered the state's oldest private college or university, being founded in 1854 as a Methodist coeducational institution. [11] Mayo Medical School, the University of Minnesota, and University of Minnesota Duluth feature the only medical schools in the state. [12] Mitchell Hamline School of Law, the University of Minnesota Law School, and the University of St. Thomas School of Law are American Bar Association-accredited law schools. [13]


Riverland Community College - History

I started at Austin Riverland as a PSEO senior and I have continued to earn credit for graduation. I think Riverland is a good way to prepare people for 4 year universitys. I have enjoyed my time here.

This is a community college which serves the special needs of the community. The community standard carries over into the college. This is a state school and part of the state education system.

Albert Lea is the worst town ever, Owatonna has lots of tornadoes, and Austin has quite a lot of crime for such a small town. Riverland has pretty good staff and faculty, except for a few instructors. Its a pretty generic community college.

This is for the Albert Lea campus. It says Riverland Community College on the building, much if I had known they run a full blown ALC center, I would have gone elsewhere. High School and College does not mix. Also classes are a joke, schedule times means nothing and catered to the ones that dont want to be in class.

Riverland is an all-around good campus. Paul Anderson is a wonderful counselor and it isn't difficult to open up to him. Most teachers are willing to work with you and are available during office hours.


History of Austin, MN

Austin, Minnesota is historically and economically well-situated in the south-central part of Minnesota. Founded on the old Territorial Trail, on the south banks of the Cedar River, the county seat of Mower County now stands at the junction of highways U.S. 218, which runs north and south, and Interstate 90, which runs east and west. These provide easy access to the city from all points.

Rich land, trapping, and accessibility brought the first trappers and then the early pioneers to this region. The rich game land attracted a trapper named Austin Nichols, who built the first log cabin and staked his claim in 1853. He later sold the claim to Chauncey Leverich in 1854 and the small community was started.

In the year 1853, there were approximately twenty families in the area, but by 1855 long trains of covered wagons hauling personal belongings and followed by livestock came to the rich prairie. In 1856 there were enough settlers to organize officially a county, and so Mower County began. The same year the tiny community named itself Austin, after the trapper who had built its first log cabin.

Transportation into the little settlement was by stage coach, covered wagon, and oxen team. But as the town grew, the railroads came and in the years 1867-69, the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, with many other small branch lines, started austin on its way to being an important rail center. It became know as a “railroad town,” and the yards and traffic speeded its economic development.

Cedar River power and economic necessity made a saw mill and grist mill the first industries of Austin. Chauncey Leverich built the first saw mill on the Cedar River in 1854-55 and supplied the early settlers with lumber. In 1858 the first grist mill was built by the Truesdell brothers. Before this, flour was oxen-freighted from Decorah, Iowa or Chatfield, Minnesota.

About 1856, a farmer named W. A. Woodson saw the possibilities in austin for meat processing. He butchered and dressed out pork for sale and peddled it in town. Many years later the young George A. Hormel saw the same possibilities and in 1891, Hormel Foods Corporation was established.

Cash was a scarce commodity in those early years, but with the mills, the railroads, and a general increase in business, a bank was needed. Harlan Page opened the first bank in 1866. Austin has three banks now but the earliest United States Government Charter was to the First National in 1868.

The first school was held in a log cabin near Chauncey Leverich’s mill. The year was about 1854-55. In 1856-57 school was held in the Robert Audis Building, from early records it is believed that Maria Vaughn was the first teacher in austin. It wasn’t until 1865 that the first school was built.

In 1897 Charles Boostrom opened the Southern Minnesota Normal College and Austin School of Commerce. This college operated until 1925. In 1940 the public school system opened Austin Junior College. In 1964 it became part of the state system of junior colleges and is now renamed Riverland Community College.

A Methodist circuit preacher held the first church services in town in 1855. First services for the Congregational Church were held in 1857 in the old Headquarters Building, which stood on the north corner of Main Street and Second Avenue Northwest.

The first hotel was started in 1856 by J. H. McKinley.

Dr. Ormanzo Allen came to austin in 1856 as its first physician. Almost thirty years later, in 1896, Dr. O. H. Hegge, together with local and county Lutherans, organized the Austin Hospital Association. As a result St. Olaf Hospital was established as a non-profit organization.

The first newspaper, the Mower County Mirror, was started in 1858. Utilities were necessary, so city wells were dug. Street lamps were ordered and installed. The Oakwood Cemetery was started by the women of the town. Austin’s first library was begun by the Floral Club. In 1856-57 the Headquarters Building was built. This housed the first court, school and church meetings, and public meetings.

The City of Austin is governed by a Home Rule Charter which was framed and adopted March 10, 1903, pursuant to the General Laws of Minnesota. A Home Rule Charter is a charter drawn by the town itself, tailored to its own needs and desires under authority given by the constitution of the state.

In April 1949, the Park and Recreation Board was created through combination of the Park Board, begun in 1902, and the Recreation Board, begun in 1939. Its function is to control and manage austin public parks and recreation activities.

The Jay C. Hormel Nature Center, established in 1971, is composed of the 60 acre Hormel Arboretum, purchased from Geordie Hormel with a state grant.

Marcusen Memorial Park was dedicated by the City of Austin as a living memorial to those who died in World War I and II. It is a well lighted community baseball park to be used by locally sponsored baseball teams.


Riverland Community College - History

Helmets of Discontinued American College Teams

This page contains helmet designs used in the past by college teams whose schools do not presently sponsor varsity football. Many dozens of American colleges have had varsity football teams in the past and have since dropped the sport altogether below is a list that is believed to be complete (or nearly so) back to 1950, with some earlier dropped programs also listed. This list was initially populated with information from the 1998 NCAA Football Record Book but I have amended it substantially and have attempted to add to it all the colleges that have dropped football since 1998. The year listed is in most cases the last year that the school fielded a football team, but in some instances it refers to the year in which the decision to discontinue football was made. Many of these colleges have since changed names, merged with other colleges, or closed altogether. I would greatly appreciate additional information about football helmets used by varsity teams at any of these schools during the period 1960 to present.

Partial list of discontinued American college teams

  • Adelphi University (Garden City, NY) (1972)
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL) (2014) (football was restored in 2017)
  • Alliance College (Cambridge Springs, PA) (1950)
  • Allen University (Columbia, SC) (2006) (football resumed in 2018)
  • Aquinas College (Grand Rapids, MI) (1952)
  • Arnold College (Bridgeport, CT) (1952) (merged with Bridegeport University)
  • Arkansas College (Batesville, AR) (1951) (now Lyon College, which restored football in 2016)
  • Atlantic Christian College (Wilson, NC) (1951) (now Barton College, which announced in 2018 that football will be re-instated)
  • Bacone College (Muskogee, OK) (2018)
  • Baptist Christian University (Shreveport, LA) (1983) (now Louisiana Baptist University)
  • Bishop College (Dallas, TX) (1987)
  • Blackburn College (Carlinville, IL) (2009)
  • Bluefield State College (Bluefield, WV) (1981) (football will return in 2021)
  • Boston State College (Boston, MA) (1982) (merged with University of Massachusetts Boston) )
  • Boston University (Boston, MA) (1998)
  • Bradley University (Peoria, IL) (1970)
  • Brandeis University (Waltham, MA) (1960)
  • University of Bridgeport (Bridgeport, CT) (1974)
  • Brooklyn College (Brooklyn, NY) (1991)
  • University of California, Riverside (1976)
  • University of California at San Diego (1969)
  • University of California at Santa Barbara (1992)
  • California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Pomona, CA) (1983)
  • California State University, Chico (Chico, CA) (1997)
  • California State University, Fullerton (Fullerton, CA) (1993)
  • California State University, Hayward (Hayward, CA) (1993) (now Cal State University, East Bay)
  • California State University, Los Angeles (1978)
  • California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA) (1977)
  • Cameron University (Lawton, OK) (1993)
  • Canisius College (Buffalo, NY) (2002)
  • Canterbury College (Danville, IN) (1951)
  • Carlisle Indian School (Carlisle, PA) (1917)
  • Cedarville College (Cedarville, OH) (1953) (now Cedarville University)
  • Centenary College of Louisiana (Shreveport, LA) (1947)
  • Champlain College (Burlington, VT) (1953)
  • Cheyney University (Cheyney, PA) (2017)
  • Cincinnati Christian University (Cincinnati, OH) (2019)
  • City College of New York (New York, NY) (1951)
  • Claflin University (Orangeburg, SC) (1965)
  • Clarkson College (Omaha, NE) (1952)
  • College of Emporia (Emporia, KS) (1974)
  • College of the Ozarks (Clarksville, AR) (1967) (now University of the Ozarks)
  • Colorado College (Colorado Springs, CO) (2009)
  • Concordia College (Selma, AL) (2015)
  • University of Corpus Christi (Corpus Christi,TX) (1967) (now Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi)
  • Creighton University (Omaha, NE) (1942)
  • Dana College (Blair, NE) (2010)
  • Daniel Baker College (Brownwood, TX) (1951)
  • Davis & Elkins College (Elkins, WV) (1962)
  • University of Denver (Denver, CO) (1961)
  • DePaul University (Chicago, IL) (1948)
  • University of Detroit (Detroit, MI) (1965) (now University of Detroit Mercy)
  • Detroit Institute of Technology (Detroit, MI) (1951)
  • Dillard University (New Orleans, LA) (1965)
  • District of Columbia Teachers' College (Washington, DC) (1974) (now University of the District of Columbia)
  • Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) (1974)
  • Eastern Montana College (Billings, MT) (1978) (now Montana State University-Billings)
  • Erskine College (Due West, SC) (1952) (football will resume in 2020)
  • University of Evansville (Evansville, IN) (1998)
  • Fairfield University (Fairfield, CT) (2003)
  • Federal City College (Washington, DC) (1975) (now University of the District of Columbia)
  • Fisk University (Nashville, TN) (1984)
  • Florida Institute of Technology (Melbourne, FL) (2019)
  • Florida Normal and Industrial Memorial College (St. Augustine, FL) (1959) (now Florida Memorial University, Miami Gardens, FL, which resumed football in 2020)
  • Fort Lauderdale College (Fort Lauderdale, FL) (1982) (later named Florida Metropolitan University, then Everest University)
  • Frederick College (Portsmouth, VA) (1967) (school closed in 1968)
  • George Washington University (Washington, DC) (1967)
  • Georgia Southwestern College (Americus, GA) (1989) (now Georgia Southwestern University)
  • Gonzaga University (Spokane, WA) (1941)
  • Haskell Indian Nations University (Lawrence, KS) (2014)
  • Haverford College (Haverford, PA) (1972)
  • High Point College (High Point, NC) (1951) (now High Point University)
  • Hiram Scott College (Scottsbluff, NE) (1971) (school closed in 1972)
  • Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY) (2009)
  • Holy Trinity College (Dallas, TX) (1926)
  • Humboldt State University (Arcata, CA) (2018)
  • Huntington College (Huntington, IN) (1950) (school is now named Huntington University)
  • University of Illinois at Chicago Circle (1973)
  • Iona College (New Rochelle, NY) (2008)
  • Jacksonville University (Jacksonville, FL) (2019)
  • Jarvis Christian College (Wood County, TX) (1967)
  • Jonesboro College (Jonesboro, AR) (1934)
  • Knoxville College (Knoxville, TN) (1996)
  • La Salle University (Philadelphia, PA) (2007)
  • Lambuth University (Jackson, TN) (2011)
  • Lees-McRae College (Banner Elk, NC) (1994)
  • Leland College (Baker, LA) (1960) (school closed in 1960)
  • LeMoyne-Owen College (Memphis, TN) (1951)
  • Lewis College of Science and Technology (Romeoville, IL) (1957) (school is now named Lewis University)
  • Lincoln University (Chester County, PA) (1961) (football was restored in 2008)
  • Lindenwood University-Belleville (Belleville, IL) (2018)
  • Long Beach State University (Long Beach, CA) (1992)
  • Louisville Municipal College (Louisville, KY) (1952)
  • Lowell Textile Institute (Lowell, MA) (1951)
  • Loyola University Chicago (Chicago, IL) (1930)
  • Loyola University of Los Angeles (Los Angeles,CA) (1952) (now Loyola Marymount University)
  • Lubbock Christian College (Lubbock, TX) (1983)
  • MacMurray College (Jacksonville, IL) (2019)
  • Malone University (Canton, OH) (2019)
  • Manhattan College (New York, NY) (1942)
  • Mansfield University (Mansfield, PA) (2006)
  • Maranatha Baptist University (Watertown, WI) (2017)
  • Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI) (1961)
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore (Princess Anne, MD) (1980)
  • University of Massachusetts Boston (2000)
  • Menlo College (Atherton, CA) (2015)
  • Milligan College (Elizabethton, TN) (1951)
  • Milton College (Milton, WI) (1982)
  • University of Minnesota Crookston (Crookston, MN) (2019)
  • Mississippi Industrial College (Holly Springs, MS) (1965) (school closed in 1982)
  • Morris College (Sumter, SC) (1967?)
  • Morthland College (West Franklin, IL) (2017)
  • Mount Ida College (Newton, MA) (2018)
  • Mount Senario (Ladysmith, WI) (2001)
  • Mount St. Mary's College (Emmittsburg, MD) (1951) (now Mount St. Mary's University)
  • Nebraska Central College (Central City, NE) (1952)
  • University of Nebraska Omaha (Omaha, NE) (2011)
  • New Bedford Textile School (MA) (1951)
  • New England College (NH) (1973)
  • New Jersey City University (Jersey City, NJ) (2002)
  • New York Institute of Technology (Old Westbury, NY) (1983)
  • New York University (New York, NY) (1953)
  • Niagara University (Lewiston, NY) (1951)
  • Northeastern University (Boston, MA) (2009)
  • Northeastern Illinois University (Chicago, IL) (1988)
  • Northern Idaho College of Education (Lewiston, ID) (1951) (now named Lewis-Clark State College)
  • Northland College (Ashland, WI) (1976)
  • Northwestern College (Watertown, WI) (1994) (school merged with Dr. Martin Luther College to form Martin Luther College, New Ulm, MN)
  • Northwood Institute (Cedar Hill, TX) (1971) (now Northwood University)
  • Occidental College (Los Angeles, CA) (2020)
  • Oklahoma City University (Oklahoma City, OK) (1950)
  • Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, OR) (1992)
  • Oswego State University (Oswego, NY) (1977)
  • University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) (1996)
  • Pacific University (Forest Grove, OR) (1992) (football was resumed in 2009)
  • Paine College (Augusta, GA) (1964 and 2015)
  • Panzer College (East Orange, NJ) (1951)
  • Parsons College (Fairfield, IA) (1971)
  • Paul Quinn College (Dallas, TX) (2007)
  • Pepperdine Uiversity (Malibu, CA) (1961)
  • Philander Smith College (Little Rock, AR) (1965)
  • Plattsburgh State University (Plattsburgh, NY) (1979)
  • University of Portland (Portland, OR) (1950)
  • Quantico Marine Corps Base (Quantico, VA) (1972)
  • Ramapo College (Mahwah, NJ) (1993)
  • Rider College (Lawrenceville, NJ) (1952)
  • Rio Grande College (Rio Grande, OH) (1950)
  • Rochester Institute of Technology (Henrietta, NY) (1978)
  • Rollins College (Winter Park, FL) (1950)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, MS) (1965)
  • St. Bonaventure University (St. Bonaventure, NY) (1952)
  • Saint Cloud State University (St. Cloud, MN) (2019)
  • St. John's University (New York, NY) (2002)
  • Saint Joseph's College (Rensselaer, IN) (2017)
  • Saint Louis University (St. Louis, MO) (1950)
  • Saint Martin's College (Lacey, WA) (1952) (now Saint Martin's University)
  • Saint Mary of the Plains College (Dodge City, KS) (1992) (school closed in 1992)
  • Saint Mary's College (Winona, MN) (1955) (now Saint Mary's University of Minnesota)
  • Saint Mary's College of California (Moraga, CA) (2004)
  • Saint Michael's College (Santa Fe, NM) (1951) (now Santa Fe University of Art and Design)
  • Saint Michael's College (Colchester, VT) (1954)
  • Saint Paul's College (Lawrenceville, VA) (2011) (school closed in 2013)
  • Saint Peter's College (Jersey City, NJ) (2007) (now Saint Peter's University)
  • Saint Vincent College (Latrobe, PA) (1963) (football was restored in 2007)
  • Salem College (Salem, WV) (1988) (now Salem University)
  • Samuel Huston College (TX) (1952) (merged with Tillotson College in 1952 to form Huston-Tillitson College, now Huston-Tillotson University)
  • University of San Francisco (CA) (1972)
  • San Francisco State University (CA) (1995)
  • Santa Clara University (Santa Clara, CA) (1993)
  • Scranton University (Scranton, PA) (1961)
  • Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ) (1982)
  • Siena College (Loudonville, NY) (2004)
  • Si Tanka University at Huron (Huron, SD) (2004) (school closed in 2005)
  • Shurtleff College (Alton, IL) (1954) (school became a campus of Southern Illinois University in 1957)
  • Sonoma State University (Rohnert Park, CA) (1997)
  • South Carolina Trade School (Columbia (?), SC) (1967)
  • University of South Dakota at Springfield (Springfield, SD) (1984) (school closed in 1984)
  • Southern California College (Costa Mesa, CA) (1962) (now Vanguard University)
  • University of Southern Colorado (Pueblo, CO) (1985) (school is now Colorado State University-Pueblo and football was resumed in 2008)
  • Southern Idaho College (Buhl, ID) (1951)
  • Southwestern University (Georgetown, TX) (1951) (football was resumed in 2013)
  • College of Steubenville (Steubenville, OH) (1950) (now Franciscan University of Steubenville)
  • Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL) (2015)
  • Sue Bennett College (London, KY) (1997) (school closed in 1997)
  • Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA) (2000)
  • University of Tampa (Tampa, FL) (1975)
  • Tarkio College (Tarkio, MO) (1991)
  • University of Texas at Arlington (1986)
  • Texas College (Tyler, TX) (1961) (football was restored in 2003)
  • Tillotson College (Austin, TX) (1951)
  • Tougaloo College (Tougaloo, MS) (1961)
  • Trinity Bible College (Ellendale, ND) (2019)
  • Union University (Jackson, TN) (1953)
  • U.S. International University (San Diego, CA) (1980)
  • Upsala College (East Orange, NJ) (1994)
  • Urbana University (Urbana, OH) (2019)
  • University of Vermont (Burlington, VT) (1975)
  • Washington College (Chestertown, MD) (1951)
  • West Virginia University Tech (Montgomery, WV) (2011)
  • Western Washington University (Bellingham, WA) (2009)
  • Westmar University (Le Mars, IA) (1997)
  • Westminster College (Salt Lake City, UT) (1979)
  • Whitman College (Walla Walla, WA) (1977)
  • Wichita State University (Wichita, KS) (1987)
  • Wiley College (Marshall, TX) (1969)
  • William Carey College (Hattiesburg, MS) (1956)
  • University of Wisconsin Extension (Milwaukee, WI) (1956)
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI) (1975)
  • University of Wisconsin-Superior (Superior, WI) (1992)
  • Xavier University of Louisiana (New Orleans, LA) (1961)
  • Xavier University (Cincinnati, OH) (1984)
  • Yankton College (Yankton, SD) (1984) (school closed in 1984)
  • York College (York, NE) (1954)

Partial list of discontinued junior and community college teams

Additions to this list would be appreciated!

  • Anoka-Ramsey Community College (Coon Rapids, MN) (last year unknown)
  • Austin Community College (Austin, MN) (last year unknown school is now a campus of Riverland Community College)
  • Arizona Western College (Yuma, AZ) (2018)
  • Cayuga Community College (Auburn, NY) (team existed 1996-1999)
  • Community College of Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) (last year unknown school is now a campus of Riverland Community College)
  • Brainerd Community College (Brainerd, MN) (last year unknown school merged with Brainerd Staples Technical College in 1995 to form Central Lakes College)
  • Centralia College (Centralia, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Clackamas Community College (Oregon City, OR) (last year unknown)
  • Columbia Basin College (Pasco, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Cowley County Community College (Arkansas City, KS) (1983)
  • College of Eastern Utah (Price, UT) (1963)
  • Eastern Arizona College (Thatcher, AZ) (2018)
  • Everett Community College (Everett, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Fairbury Junior College (Fairbury, NE) (last year unknown)
  • Glendale Community College (Glendale, AZ) (2018)
  • Golden Valley Lutheran College (Golden Valley, MN) (last year unknown school closed in 1985)
  • Grand Rapids Community College (Grand Rapids, MI) (2012)
  • Grays Harbor College (Aberdeen, WA) (1976)
  • Harford Community College (Bel Air, MD) (1985)
  • Harper College (Palatine, IL) (2012)
  • Hibbing Community College (Hibbing, MN) (2006)
  • Illinois Valley Community College (Oglesby, IL) (1996)
  • Indian Hills Community College (Ottumwa, IA) (last year unknown)
  • Inver Hills Community College (Inver Grove Heights, MN) (last year unknown)
  • Iowa Lakes Community College (Emmetsburg, IA) (last year unknown)
  • Joliet Junior College (Joliet, IL) (2011)
  • Kemper Military Junior College (Boonville, MO) (last year unknown)
  • Kennedy-King College (Chicago, IL) (last year unknown)
  • Lakewood Community College (White Bear Lake, MN) (last year unknown)
  • Lees-McRae College (Banner Elk, NC) (1989?)
  • Little Rock Junior College (Little Rock, AR) (1948)
  • College of Marin (Kentfield, CA) (2008)
  • Marshalltown Community College (Marshalltown, IA) (last year unknown)
  • Marion Military Institute (Marion, AL) (last year unknown)
  • McCook Junior College (McCook, NE) (last year unknown school is now a division of Mid-Plains Community College)
  • Mendocino College (Mendocino, CA) (2016)
  • Mesa Community College (Mesa, AZ) (2018)
  • Middle Georgia College (Cochran, GA) (2001)
  • Montgomery College (Rockville, MD) (2002)
  • Moraine Valley Community College (Palos Hills, IL) (1993)
  • Morton College (Cicero, IL) (last year unknown)
  • Mount Hood Community College (Gresham, OR) (last year unknown)
  • Mountain Home College (Mountain Home, AR) (last year unknown approximately 1928)
  • Norfolk Junior College (Norfolk, NE) (last year unknown) (now Northeast Community College)
  • Normandale Community College (Bloomington, MN) (last year unknown)
  • North Iowa Area C.C. (Mason City, IA) (2008)
  • Olympic Junior College (Bremerton, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Phoenix College (Phoenix, AZ) (2018)
  • Pima Community College (Tuscon, AZ) (2018)
  • Potomac State College (Keyser, WV) (1999?)
  • Pratt Community College (Pratt, KS) (last year unknown)
  • Rainy River Community College (International Falls, MN) (last year unknown)
  • Ranger Junior College (Early, TX) (last year unknown)
  • Ricks College (Rexburg, ID) (2001) (school renamed to Brigham Young University-Idaho in 2001 and all intercollegiate athletic teams were dropped)
  • Ridgewater College (Willmar, MN) (2018)
  • Rock Valley College (Rockford, IL) (2010)
  • Scottsbluff Junior College (Scottsbluff, NE) (last year unknown) (now Western Nebraska Community College)
  • Scottsdale Community College (Scottsdale, AZ) (2018)
  • Shoreline Community College (Shoreline, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Solano Community College (Fairfield, CA) (2012)
  • South Georgia College (Douglas, GA) (1958)
  • Spokane Falls Community College (Spokane, WA) (last year unknown)
  • SUNY-Canton (Canton, NY) (last year unknown)
  • Taft College (Taft, CA) (1993)
  • Texarkana College (Texarkana, AR) (last year unknown)
  • Thornton Community College (South Holland, IL) (last year unknown) (school now named South Suburban Community College)
  • Treasure Valley Community College (Ontario, OR) (last year unknown)
  • Trinidad State Junior College (Trinidad, CO) (last year unknown)
  • Triton College (River Grove, IL) (1992)
  • Walla Walla Community College (Walla Walla, WA) (last year unknown)
  • Wenatchee Valley College (Wenatchee, WA) (last year unknown)
  • West Valley College (Saratoga, CA) (2013)
  • Westchester Community College (Valhalla, NY) (last year unknown)
  • Wharton County Junior College (Wharton, TX) (last year unknown)
  • Wilbur Wright College (Chicago, IL) (last year unknown)
  • Willmar Community College (Willman, MN) (last year unknown school merged with Hutchinson-Willmar Regional Technical College in 1996 to form Ridgewater College)
  • Yakima Valley Community College (Yakima, WA) (last year unknown)

Discontinued Major College Teams

c.early 1960s c.1963 c.1969
1976 c.late 1980s? c.1993
c.1990s? c.1990s? ? - 1997
1997
*see note 1 below

1970 1971 1972 - 1974
1975 - 1976 1977 1978 - 1979
1980 - 1984 1985 - 1987 1988 - 1991
1992

The Cal State-Fullerton football team existed from 1970 through 1992 it was a member of the Big West Conference during its last few years of existence.

Below are the best photographs of the "missing" helmets that I have yet received - I do not yet have any color photographs of these (except 1978-1979) but I think the helmet shells were almost certainly dark blue in each case. It appears to me that the oval-shape on the 1971 helmet contained an "F" but I have received a conflicting description which stated that it contained the text "Cal State Fullerton".

(No information yet for 1972 - 1974, and 1977).

Cal State Northridge spent the 2001 season (the team's last) as an NCAA Division I-AA independent, having previously been a member of the Big Sky Conference for several years. The black helmet shown above is the design used by CSUN during roughly the last four years of the team's existence I believe that the helmet design used immediately prior to this one featured a plain red shell (no logos) with a black facemask (confirmation of this would be appreciated). I have received conflicting reports indicating that, during earlier seasons, the team used red helmets with black facemasks, a black stripe, and either: a black "N" logo, similar to the one used by Nebraska (according to one person), OR the team name "Matadors" (according to another person). No photographs of either of these have been received. The first helmet design shown above was in use during at least the 1992 game against Cal State-Fullerton.

GWU (Washington, DC) fielded a major college team through the 1966 season the last GWU team played a schedule that featured four current NCAA Division I-A teams and six current I-AA schools. The helmet shown above is one used by the team during at least the 1960 season. The 1966 helmet has been described as being plain white also, but with a blue/"yellowish-gold"/blue stripe sequence. Color photos would be appreciated.

? - 1982 c.1985 ? - 1990
1991 - 2004 2005 - 2007 2008
2009

Hofstra announced the discontinuation of its intercollegiate football team on December 3, 2009, citing a lack of interest in the team on behalf of the school's students and alumni, and a desire to re-allocate funding towards other pursuits. Hofstra's football team first played in 1937, and had moved from NCAA Division III to Division I-AA in 1991. The 2009 team finished with a 5-6 record.

I have partial information for some of Hofstra's other earlier helmet designs, and I could add some of these to the site if I could obtain color photographs to clarify some of the following uncertainties about the colors:

During the very early 1960s, the team used dark-colored helmet shells (supposedly navy blue) with light-colored players' uniform numerals on the sides. By 1963, the numerals were reduced in size and moved to the front of the helmets an "H" replaced the numerals on the sides of the helmets. I would appreciate any color photographs from these years.

By at least some time in 1964, the "H" was replaced with a logo that I cannot identify from the few photographs that I have seen showing it. A single light-colored stripe was also added to the helmet design in 1964.

Photographs from 1965 show Hofstra still using dark-colored helmets shells, but with another new logo - a light-colored "H" inside a dark-colored oval shape, which is in turn surrounded by a light-colored outline. The 1966 design was similar, but the colors within the logo were apparently reversed (the "H" was dark, and the oval shape apparently white).

In 1967 and 1968, Hofstra once again used light-colored players' uniform numerals on the sides of the helmet shells, which were still some dark color. There were several stripes of unknown colors on the helmets during these years.

A new logo was adopted in 1969 - an interlocking "HU" that appears to have probably been yellow or gold in color. A photograph from 1970 shows the team apparently reverting back to the design used in 1966 in 1971, this design was apparently modified by the dropping of the light-colored stripe.

I do not have any information for Hofstra from the year 1972, but in 1973 and 1974, the team was using the unusual helmet logo shown in the photograph here - a lower-case "h" above a "u", both inside a vertical oval-shape of some unknown color.

In 1975, plain blue helmets may have been used, and in 1976 the team once again used the 1966 helmet design, an "H" inside a light-colored oval. I believe that the oval -shape was yellow or gold in color in 1976, but had probably been white during the earlier years when it was in use.

1964 - 1965 1966 - ? c.mid 1970s
? - 1981 1982 - 1983 1984 - 1989
*see note 1 below
1990 - 1991

LBSU is one of several California schools which dropped intercollegiate football during the 1990s. The "49ers" were in the Big West Conference in 1991, which was their last season of football. The team competed at the Division I level from 1969 through 1991.

I have not received much information for this team's earlier helmets. Some very poor-quality photographs recovered from the university's web site suggest that the team may have been using gold helmets (as opposed to yellow ones, like the first one shown above) during the 1960s. No logos are visible in the photographs that I have seen. However, it has been reported to me that the helmets were always yellow in 1964 and later.

*1 A mid-1970s helmet was very similar to this one, but featured the addition of a set of stripes colored brown/white/brown. The facemask color of this version is unknown.

The last varsity Marquette (Milwaukee, WI) football team played in 1960 and used the helmet design shown above.

c.1960s c.1967 1969
1968 1970 - 1976 1977 - 1980 1981 - 1986
1987 - 1990 1991 - 1997 1998 - 1999
2000 - 2001 2002 - 2003 2004 - 2009

On November 20, 2009, the decision was made to end the football team at Northeastern University, which had participated for many years as a member of the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision's Colonial Athletic Association. The 2009 team had finished with a 3-8 record.

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

c.1960s c.1973 1980 - 1983
1984 - 1988 1989 - 1990 1991
1992 - 1995

The University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) was a member of the Big West Conference when the school discontinued its football program following the 1995 season it was the last NCAA Division I-FBS school to do so until UAB dropped football at the end of the 2014 season.

The University of Tampa (Tampa, FL) had an intercollegiate football team from 1933 through 1974 the team was discontinued despite enjoying considerable success during its last several seasons, including victories over Miami (FL) in both 1970 and 1972. The last helmet design shown above was apparently used by the team during its last few years. It was reported to me many years ago that the team went through several different helmet designs during the 1960s, but very few photographs have been received or found showing other designs for this team. "Spartans" was the team nickname.

? - 1960 1961 - 1962 1963
1964 1965 - 1966 1967 - 1969
1970 1971 - 1973 1974 - 1977
1978 - 1980 c.1981 c.1985

The Texas-Arlington "Mavericks" last played football in 1985 as a member of the Southland Conference. The team had played at the Division I level from 1970 through 1985, and in Division II from 1959 through 1969. The name of the school was Arlington State College prior to 1967, and the team nickname was "Rebels" prior to 1971.

1960 - 1961 1962 - 1967 1968 - 1969
1970 - 1972 1973 - 1974

Vermont's football team was nicknamed the "Catamounts" and played its last season in 1974. The team had been a member of the Yankee Conference for many years.

? - 1961 1962 - 1964 1965
1966 1967 1968
1969 - 1973 1974 - 1977 1978 - 1980
1981 - 1983 1984 - 1986

Wichita State last played football in 1986 as an NCAA Division I-A independent team earlier the team was a member of the Missouri Valley Conference for many years. The above are all of the "known" helmet designs used by the WSU team - which was called the "Shockers" - during the period covered by this website (1960 to present) with the exception of the three designs used from 1965 through 1967.

Of those three, the most interesting is the great 1965 design, which apparently had a yellow shell with a cartoon "wheatshocker" logo on both sides below are some low-quality photographs of this design gathered from the university's yearbooks, which have been digitized and published on the internet:

The logo used on the helmet is apparently similar to the one shown below, but possibly without the "legs", possibly without the "WSU" on the shirt, and possibly with a different top of the "head" (there appears to be a more substantial black-colored region on the top of the figure's head on the helmet logo).

The 1966 design had a "W" logo inside a black oval-shape this was worn on helmets of an unknown color (presumably either the same 'yellow' color used from 1960 through 1965, or else a 'gold' color like that used by teams such as the San Francisco 49ers, New Orleans Saints, Boston College, etc). No color photographs of the 1966 design appear in WSU's yearbook for that season, but the appearance in the monochrome photographs in that yearbook is more consistent with 'gold' helmets than with 'yellow' ones.

In 1967 WSU used white helmets with a diagonal "WSU" logo which was apparently black in color:

I would greatly appreciate any clearer photographs of the 1965 through 1967 Wichita State helmets.

Xavier University (Cincinnati, OH) had an intercollegiate football team from 1900 through 1973 the team was a major independent team throughout the period documented by this website. The helmet design shown above was apparently the last one used by the team and was in use by at least 1970 blue helmets may have been used during the 1960s. "Musketeers" was the team nickname.

Discontinued Smaller College Teams

Adelphi University (Garden City, NY) had an intercollegiate football team for a short period during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The team played at the NCAA's College Division level, which was the predecessor of Division II and Division III. The Adelphi football team was a club-level team in the mid-1960s but was apparently a varsity team from 1968 through 1971.

The team apparently always used white helmets with one brown stripe, and some photographs from the period show some helmets with an oval-shaped logo containing the letter "A" it is unclear whether the "A" logo was ever in widespread use. "Panthers" was the team nickname.

2006 - 2007 2001 - 2005 2008 - 2010? 2011? - 2017

Facing financial difficulties, Bacone College (Muskogee, OK) announced that it would close in May 2018 this announcement was later rescinded and the college remains in operation, though without its football team, which was discontinued. The school had an NAIA football team from 2001 through 2017 and a junior college team in 1957 and earlier. The above are to the best of my knowledge all of the helmet designs used by the team during the modern era.

Baptist Christian University (Shreveport, LA) had an intercollegiate football team from (apparently) 1974 to 1983 (the school was established in 1973). The photograph below from 1978 is the only one I have found showing a helmet design used by the team - the logo is apparently an "Indian head" (the team nickname was "Warriors"). The school was renamed Louisiana Baptist University in 1993 LBU does not presently have intercollegiate sports teams.

Bishop College, an Historically Black school located in Dallas, TX, closed in 1988 the college had a football team from at least 1911 through 1986. The second helmet design shown above was used by the team during at least the 1985 season, its next-to-last, "Tigers" was the team nickname.

Paul Quinn College (see below) purchased and relocated to the former Bishop College campus in Dallas in 1990, where it remains.

? - 1999? 2000? - 2002? 2003? - 2005
2006 2007 - 2008

Blackburn College (Carlinville, IL) announced the termination of its intercollegiate football team on January 21, 2009. The team had competed at the NCAA Division III level for many years, and in the Saint Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference during 2008, the team's final season.

I have received some partial information about a few other helmet designs used by Blackburn during the early 1990s: in 1990, the team used black helmets with silver facemasks and one single stripe the helmets were "blank" until about midway through the football season, then silver uniform numerals were added to the sides of the helmets. In 1991, the facemasks were changed to black, two white stripes were added on either side of the silver stripe, and the numerals were replaced with the word "Blackburn" in silver, outlined in white. In 1992, the facemask color was changed again to red, the stripe sequence was altered to red-white-red, and the "Blackburn" decal was replaced with a white block "B" outlined in red. This design was used through at least the 1993 season. I would greatly appreciate photographs of any of these helmets. Thanks to Corny for this information.

Bluefield State College, an historically Black college in Bluefield, WV, had an intercollegiate football team for several decades through 1980. I have been unable to locate any information about helmet designs for this team other than a few photographs of similar quality to those below, which are from Elon University's 1976 yearbook. I believe these helmets are those worn by Bluefield State, which did play Elon in 1975. The logo appears to be a simple "pitchfork". "Big Blues" is the college's athletic team nickname but "devil" imagery has long been used by the college's teams.

Football is scheduled to return to Bluefield State in 2021.

? - 1972 1973 1974
1975 - 1977 1978 1979
1980 - ?

Boston State College (Boston, MA) had a football team from 1971 through 1981 the team was discontinued when the college merged with the University of Massachusetts-Boston. The team nickname was "Warriors".

  • 1972: helmets appear to be plain white with two dark stripes bordering a very wide white middle stripe
  • 1973: probably silver but perhaps yellow or gold helmets with an "Indian head" logo on the sides
  • 1978: apparently plain white with two dark stripes (probably green) flanking a white middle stripe
  • 1979: white with a "B" inside circle with (probably) green/yellow/green stripes - facemask color is probably either gray or yellow
  • 1980: presumably green with a logo that I cannot identify in the one available photograph.

Below are some photographs from old BSC yearbooks.

Bradley University (Peoria, IL) had a football team for many decades which played its last season in 1970. Apparently throughout the 1960s the team used white helmets with a single red stripe and with red uniform numerals, except for the 1969 season when the numerals were replaced with the college football centennial "100" logo in some unknown color (photograph below).

Brooklyn College (New York, NY) had a varsity intercollegiate football team from 1975 through 1990. Information about this team is very scarce and only a few photographs have been located. The first photograph below is from Marist College's 1979 yearbook, showing what I believe to be a Brooklyn College helmet (Brooklyn was the only "BC" team Marist played in 1978) the second is from Stony Brook University's 1984 yearbook. A third photograph reveals the helmet color (red or reddish) but little else. The school colors today are maroon and gold, and "Bulldogs" is the name used by the college's athletic teams, but "Kingsmen" was the nickname during the period while the college had a football team.

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona had a football team (named the "Broncos") through 1982 the team played at NCAA Division II level during its last few years. Information about this team has been very difficult to locate, but apparently several other different helmet designs were used, including ones with gold, yellow, and white helmet shells.

Anyone investigating this team, be advised: it is very often confused with the Cal Poly San Luis Obispo team, which still exists (in the Big Sky Conference), has similar school colors (green and gold), and a similar team nickname ("Mustangs"). The two even played each other a number of times in the 1970s, Schedules printed in old media guides, yearbooks, etc often list "Cal Poly" without helpfully distinguishing between the two teams.

California State University, Hayward (Hayward, CA - now named California State University, East Bay) had a football team through the 1993 season the team nickname was "Pioneers". The second helmet design shown above was used for at least several years during the mid-1980s the first design was used during an unknown earlier period.

The helmet design shown above was apparently used by this team during at least the 1966 and 1967 seasons. Cal State Los Angeles (also referred to as Los Angeles State) had a football team until 1978 which competed at the NCAA College Division level (predecessor of Division II). The team's nickname was "Diablos".

The University of California San Diego (UCSD) had a football team for one season only - 1968 - before the sport was dropped. As a smaller, short-lived California college team from the pre-internet age, this has been one of the most difficult teams for which to find any information regarding a helmet design. The university did not publish a yearbook for 1968-1969, and while the campus newspapers for that year have been digitized and published on the internet, none of them contain any photographs clear enough to reveal anything about a helmet design other than the shell color (apparently white).

This leaves as a possible source of information only the football team's 1968 opponents, and I think I have found photographs of the UCSD helmet design in CalTech's 1969 yearbook. CalTech ended a 34-game losing streak when it defeated UCSD 34-31 on November 9 and most of the football photographs in the CalTech yearbook appear to be from this game. Below are the clearer photographs and a logo which I believe is very similar to the one used by UCSD:

If any clearer photographs of the 1968 UCSD football helmet are in existence I would obviously greatly appreciate an opportunity to see them. "Tritons" was the team nickname.

c.1960s c.late 1980s?/early 1990s?

The University of California, Santa Barbara had an intercollegiate football team for several decades through the 1971 season, when the program was first dropped. It was resumed in 1984 and dropped again after the 1991 season.

Below is a photograph of another design used by the team this photograph is from the 1971 season.

CALTECH (California Institute of Technology)

? - 1967 1968 - 1969 1970 - 1972
1973 - 1975 1976 - 1977

The Caltech football team last played in 1977.

c.early 1970s 1979 - 1983 1985 1986 - 1992

Canisius (Buffalo, NY) announced the dropping of its football program on October 31, 2002. The Golden Griffins participated in the NCAA Division I-AA Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference during their last several seasons, and in Division III earlier.

c.late 1990s 2002 - 2004 2009 - 2011?
2012? - 2013 2014 2004 - 2008 2015 - 2017?
*see note 2 below *see note 1 below

Cheyney University, an Historically Black school in Cheyney, PA, announced the termination of its football team on December 9, 2017, citing as a reason the school's ongoing financial difficulties. The football team, nicknamed the "Wolves", had participated as a member of the NCAA Division II Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference for many years. I rarely received any information about this team, and it is entirely possible that some helmet designs used by the team were missed, even during the more recent football seasons.

During at least the 2001 season, Cheyney apparently used a helmet logo that was very similar to the one shown on the first helmet above, but with a white "CU" added to the logo.

I received a report prior to the start of the 2005 season indicating that Cheyney would be using a "C" logo that year, similar to the one used by Connecticut, but no photographs were ever provided showing such a decal, and the only photograph that I ever saw from the 2005 season showed the team using "plain" helmets without any side decals.

Descriptions (but not photographs) have been received for a couple of earlier helmet designs. In the mid-1970s the team used white helmets with the school name in blue letters on the sides, and a blue/white/blue stripe sequence. Another design was similar but with a blue "wolf head" logo replacing "Cheyney". During the early 1990s the team again used white helmets with a blue "wolf head" logo.

*1 The team used plain blue helmets during at least one game of the 2004 season (vs. Lock Haven) and at least one game in 2005 (vs. Bloomsburg).

*2 In 2012 and 2013 the "wolf"-shaped logo was worn only on the left side of each helmet on the right side white uniform numerals were worn (as depicted below).

? - 1982 1983 - ? ? - 1992
1995 1993 - 1994 1996 -

Chico State (CA) had a football team at the NCAA Division II level until 1997 the team nickname was "Wildcats".

2016 2017 2018 - 2019
*see note 1 below

Cincinnati Christian University (Cincinnati, OH) has an NAIA football team for four years (2016 through 2019) the school announced on October 28, 2019 that it would close following the Fall 2019 semester. The team finished with a 2-8 record in 2019, going 2-6 in played games and forfeiting the last two scheduled games (at Reinhardt and at Bluefield), Video from the October 19, 2019 game vs Union shows the team using the same design which was in use in 2018 (purple helmet with white "CCU" logo on both sides). The above are the only helmet designs of which I am aware for this team, which was called the "Eagles".

*1 Uniform numerals are worn on the left side only of this design a large 'eagle head' adorns the right side (as shown below).

Colorado College (Colorado Springs, CO) announced the discontinuation of its intercollegiate football team on March 24, 2009, citing "a mandate from the school's board of trustees to reduce spending by $8 million to $12 million during the next fiscal year". The college's geographical isolation from other football-playing schools was apparently also a factor in the decision. The team had played at the NCAA Division III level for many years, and was a member of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference in 2007 and 2008.

The above two helmet designs are the only ones for which I have received any information.

2005 2006 - 2008 2009 - 2011
2012 2013 2014 - 2015

Concordia College, an historically Black college in Selma, AL, had an unaffiliated football team for eleven years (2005 - 2015), which played mostly NAIA and NCAA Division II opponents. Financial reasons were cited for the discontinuation of the program in December 2015.

The above set of helmet designs are, to the best of my knowledge, all those used by the team, whose nickname was "Hornets".

The University of Corpus Christi (Corpus Christi, TX) had an intercollegiate football team until 1967. I have zero information about this team except for a single photograph from 1960 showing the team using plain white helmets during a game against Arlington State. The team nickname was apparently "Tarpons". The current name of the school is Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi.

? - 1999 2000 - 2002 2003
2004(?) 2004 - 2007 2008 - 2009
*see note 1 below

Dana College (Blair, NE) announced that it would be closing on June 30, 2010. At the time of the announcement the college's football team had been a member of the NAIA Great Plains Athletic Conference for several years.

*1 It is unclear to me whether Dana ever actually used this design in 2004. I received information from the college prior to the 2004 season indicating that this design would be used by the team, but the only photographs I saw from any of the team's actual games showed the next helmet (with stripes) being used. Additional information would be appreciated.

Dillard University, an historically Black college in New Orleans, LA, had a football team until about 1965. The team apparently used plain white helmets during the early 1960s, sometimes with a single blue stripe, and at other times with no stripes.

c.mid-late 1960s c.early 1970s

Eastern Montana College (which was renamed Montana State University-Billings in 1994) had a football team during at least the period 1947 through 1978. EMC was a member of the Frontier Conference from 1965 through 1978, and its predecessor, the Montana Collegiate Conference, from 1960 through 1964.

No information has been located for the team's last six seasons (1973 - 1978) but plain dark blue helmets were apparently used during the very late 1960s and early 1970s. Earlier, a cartoon "yellow jacket" logo was used for several years the yellow jacket decals were gradually abandoned by about 1968 but a few remain visible in photographs until about 1970.

1960 - 1964 1965 - 1970 1971
1972 1973 - 1974 1975 - 1976
1977 - 1980 1981 - ? ? - 1997

Evansville (IN) was a member of the NCAA Division I-AA Pioneer Football League when the university dropped its football program following the 1997 season the team nickname was "Purple Aces".

Fairfield (Fairfield, CT) discontinued its intercollegiate football program in February 2003, the third team from the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to do so in a three-month span. The above are apparently the only two helmet designs used by the team during its seven-year existence from 1996 through 2002.

'C' 'A' 'B'
2014 2017 2013 - 2018 2015 - 2018
*see note 1 below *see note 2 below
'D' 'E'
2019 2019
*see note 3 below *see note 4 below

  • 2019: D-E-E D-D-D E-D-D E-? (no information for November 16 vs Shorter)
  • 2018: B?-B-A B-A-B B-A-B B-A-B (the last game being an NCAA Division II playoff game at Lenoir-Rhyne)
  • 2017: C-C-B ?-A-A B-B-B B-A (no information for September 23 at Mississippi College)
  • 2016: A-A-B B-A-B A-?-B B-B (no information for October 29 vs Valdosta State)
  • 2015: A-A-B B-B-B A-B-A B-B
  • 2014: A-A-A A-C-C C-C-C C-C
  • 2013: A (entire season)

Florida Tech was an affiliate member of the NCAA Division II Gulf South Conference for football during its seven-year existence. 'Panthers' was the team nickname.

*1 The "FIT" logo is present on the left side only of this design uniform numerals are worn on the right side (as shown below).

*2 The "FIT" logo is present on the left side only of this design uniform numerals are worn on the right side (as shown below).

*3 The "FT" logo is present on the left side only of this design uniform numerals are worn on the right side (so the right sides resembles the right side of design 'B').

*4 Uniform numerals are worn on the left side only of this design on the right side is a large "panther head" logo (as shown below).

Frederick College (Portsmouth, VA) existed as a four-year school from 1961 to 1968 the school closed its doors in 1968. The college's football team, the "Lions", played against other small colleges in the region from at least 1964 through 1967. The second helmet design shown above was apparently used in 1966, also, before an apparent switch to red helmets was made for the team's final season in 1967. Additional information about this team would be appreciated.

Georgia Southwestern had a football team only from 1983 through 1989 which used only the helmet design shown above. The team played at the NAIA level and was known as the "Hurricanes".

HASKELL INDIAN NATIONS UNIVERSITY

2001 - 2005 2006 - 2008 ? - 2000 2009 - 2010
2011 - 2014

Haskell (Lawrence, KS) announced the suspension of its NAIA independent football team on June 12, 2015 an announcement as to the future of the team is expected by November 1, 2015.

Haverford College (Haverford, PA) had a small-college football team until 1972 the team nickname was apparently "Fords". The photograph below shows a design used by the team in at least 1969 and 1970 assuming the school colors have not changed since then, the helmets are probably black with a red "H" logo.

? - 1999 2000 2001 - 2003
2013 2004 - 2012 2014 - 2018

Humboldt State's football team was discontinued following the 2018 season, which was the team's 90th season. I would appreciate any information about helmet designs used by the team prior to the first one shown above.

ILLINOIS-CHICAGO CIRCLE

The University of Illinois at Chicago Circle and its predecessor schools had a football team from at least 1950 through 1973 the team nickname by at least the late 1960s was "Chikas". The design shown above was apparently used by the team during its last few seasons (at least from 1969 through 1973). In 1969 this same design was used but with the addition of the college football centennial ("100") logo, which was worn on the back side of UICC's helmets UICC's version of the logo featured white numerals outlined in red inside a dark blue football shape.

An earlier helmet logo used by the team apparently consisted of a dark-colored (probably red) "C" inside a circle. The school is now the University of Illinois at Chicago.

c.mid 1990s? c.late 1990s ? - 2001?
*see note 1 below
2005 only? 2002 - 2004 2006 - 2008

Iona College (New Rochelle, NY) announced the discontinuation of its intercollegiate football team on November 20, 2008. A press release from the college stated that "The dissolution of the MAAC Football League after the 2007 season and the lack of equitable opponents in Division I FCS football was [sic] the main factor in the decision".

*1 This helmet was in use at least as early as 1994, according to site visitor Justin S. Earlier helmet logos included an interlocking "IC" on gold shells, which was used on both gold and maroon helmets at different times.

1998 - 2011 2012 - 2014 2015 (last 3 games)
*see note 1 below
2015 - 2016 2017 - 2019
*see note 2 below

Jacksonville University had a football team from 1998 through 2019. The school announced on December 3, 2019 that the football team would be discontinued, and released a statement which read in part "it’s clear the resources required to support our football program outweigh the benefits to the overall Athletics Department and the University." The JU football team, which was nicknamed "Dolphins", had participated as a member of the NCAA Division I FCS Pioneer Football League for many years.

*1 Worn November 7 (vs Davidson), November 14 (at Campbell), and November 21 (vs Valparaiso). This design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side features a large "JU"/"dolphin" logo with a camouflage pattern (as represented below).

*2 This design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side features a large "JU"/"dolphin" logo (as represented below).

Knoxville College, an historically Black college in Knoxville, TN, had a football team for several decades which played its final season in 1996. The photograph below shows the team using white helmets with a "bulldog" logo in 1986.

1997 - 2001 2002 - 2003 2004
2005 - 2007

La Salle announced the termination of its intercollegiate football program on November 19, 2007 the "steady dissolution of the MAAC Football League and the changing landscape of collegiate football" were cited as reasons for the university's decision. The team had been restored in 1997 following a 56-year hiatus.

I believe that the four helmet designs shown above were the only ones used by the team during its 11-year existence.

1985 - 1987 1988 - 1989 1990 - ?
c.1994 1998? - 2007 2008 - 2009
2010

Lambuth University (Jackson, TN) closed on June 30, 2011 the school had a football team from 1985 through 2010. The team (called the 'Eagles') had been a member of the NAIA and the Mid-South Conference during its last few years. I have been unable to add the team's last two helmet designs to the web site due to the fact that I never received copies of the helmet logos for them both featured "LU" logos and may be seen in the photographs below:

As a four-year college, Lees-McRae (Banner Elk, NC) had an NAIA football team for three years (1991 - 1993) which used the designs shown above. Prior to 1991, the school was a two-year college (with a football team). The team nickname was "Bobcats".

2012 2013 - 2014? 2015?
2016 2017 2018
*see note 1 below

Lindenwood-Belleville University (Belleville, IL) had an NAIA football team for just seven years (2012 through 2018). The school had announced in early 2019 that the 2019 season would be the team's last, but due to a player shortage the final season was abruptly canceled in July 2019.

The above are, to the best of my knowledge, all of the helmet designs used by the team during its period of existence. "Lynx" was the team nickname.

*1 This design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side has a large "lynx head" logo (as depicted below).

1979 - 1980? 1981 or 1982 1981 or 1982

Lubbock Christian College (Lubbock, TX - now Lubbock Christian University) had an NAIA football team for just four seasons - 1979 through 1982. The team used at least two helmet designs during this period: the first one with an intricate shield-shaped logo, and the later one with the word "Chaps" (shortened form of the team nickname "Chaparrals"). Normally I do not populate this website with helmet images based on assumed information, but have made an exception in this case due to the scarcity of information about this team more specifically, I have made some assumptions about the helmet designs shown in the photographs below:

The photograph on the left is from an actual LCC game, and I have assumed that the helmet color is red, and that the logo and facemask are blue, in order to create the helmet image above. I made these assumptions based on the photograph on the right, which accompanied an article published about the team in 2012, and which purports to show an actual historical LCC helmet. For this second helmet design, I have assumed that the helmet was actually used by the team in either 1981 or 1982 (note that the script logo is different in the two photographs) I do not have any photographs showing this second design in use during a game. Hence the two helmet images dated "1981 or 1982" above, one having the logo in a 'Brush Script' font (or something very similar), and the other in 'Brophy Script'.

The earlier LCC helmet design (used in 1979 and 1980) also had a red shell with (apparently) a blue facemask a visitor to the website has kindly provided some much better photographs than the ones I previously showed here for this design:

The logo is a white shield-shape containing a large white "L" with dark outline, accompanied by a cartoon roadrunner and the smaller letters "CC" the team nickname was apparently spelled out along the lower bar of the "L". Some other very low-quality color photographs appear to suggest that blue was the other color within the logo. The logo was apparently similar to the one shown in the photograph below, which is distorted because it's on a t-shirt that a person is wearing:

I would greatly appreciate any additional information or photographs for this team.

1999 - 2000 2001 - 2006? 2007? - 2010
2011 - 2019

MacMurray College (Jacksonville, IL) announced on March 27, 2020 that it would permanently close at the end of the spring semester, citing "declining enrollments, rising competitive costs, and an insufficient endowment", in addition to repercussions from the Covid-19 global pandemic. The school's football team first played in 1985, and had played most recently at the NCAA Division III level as a member of the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference. 'Highlanders' was the team nickname.

I never received much information for this team, but the above helmet designs are probably all of those used by the team from 1999 through 2019. Information about earlier designs would be appreciated.

? - 2001 2002 2003 - 2005
2006 - 2007 2008 2009 - 2012
2013 - 2014 2015 2016 - 2017
*see note 1 below
2018

Malone University (Canton, OH) announced the dissolution of its intercollegiate football team on February 1, 2019, citing the need to "to eliminate a $2.5 million structural deficit". The team existed from 1993 through 2018 and had most recently participated in the NCAA Division II Great Midwest Athletic Conference. "Pioneers" was the team nickname.

*1 This design uses the "MU" logo on its left side only the right side features small silver or reflective uniform numerals (as represented below).

Mansfield (Mansfield, PA) was a member of the NCAA Division II Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference when the termination of the program was announced on November 16, 2006, an 0-10 2006 season having been completed by the team a few days earlier. "Mansfield University is too small an institution to support a football program in the manner it deserves," (University president Maravene) Loeschke said in a statement. She said the decision was troubling to former Mansfield football players, but said the school would consider reinstating the program if it could raise an endowment to fund it. "If we are able to raise sufficient funds in this way, we will open discussion about re-establishing a football program at whatever level - Division II, Division III, or Independent League - we can properly support," Loeschke said. (source for these quotes: article entitled "Mansfield eliminates football program", dated November 16, 2006, at centredaily.com (link.)).

In 2006, the last Mansfield team had worn a new helmet logo, apparently a large white "M", on its black helmets below is a photo of the 2006 helmet. I would appreciate a copy of the 2006 helmet logo, so that I may add this one to the web site.

c.1969 c.1971 - 1972 c.1974
c.late 1990s? 2003? - 2013 2014
*see note 1 below
2015 - 2016
*see note 2 below

Maranatha Baptist University (Watertown, WI previously Maranatha Baptist Bible College) announced the "retirement" of its football team on February 2, 2017. A statement issued by the university indicated that the decision was made "primarily for the well-being and safety of the student-athletes, with additional consideration given to recruiting challenges, eroding constituent support of football in general, and declining player retention." The team had first played in 1969.

The team nickname was changed from "Crusaders" to "Sabercats" for the 2014 season.

*1 This design was apparently in use during at least parts of the 2003, 2004, and 2005 seasons, but it may have been first used prior to 2003.

*2 The 2015-2016 design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side has a "sabercat" logo (as shown below).

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

UMES, an historically Black college located in Princess Anne, MD, had a football team for several decades which played its last season in 1979.

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON

UMass-Boston was a member of the NCAA Division III New England Football Conference when the college announced the disbanding of its football program at the end of the 2000 season. The helmet design shown above was apparently used by the team through most of the 1990s.

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL

1980 1981 - 1982 1983
1984 - 1985 1986 1987 - 1991
1994 - ? c.late 1990s 2001? - 2003

UMass Lowell was a member of the NCAA Division II Northeast-10 Conference at the time the school announced the termination of its intercollegiate football program in March 2003. The school was previously (until 1991) named University of Lowell Lowell played its first season of football in 1980 at the NCAA Division III level. Lowell had several other additional interesting helmet designs for which I have only partial information below are photographs of these:

Clear color photographs of any of these would probably enable me to add them to the website. The 1984-1985 design has the word "Chiefs" (the team nickname during the University of Lowell era) in red on silver helmet shells I am unsure if the letters were outlined. I have the artwork for the 1980 helmet logo, but do not know the colors as used on the helmet.

1996 - 2008 2009 - 2010 2011
2012 - 2013 2014

Menlo College (Atherton, CA) announced the termination of its NAIA-member intercollegiate football team on February 2, 2015, citing scheduling difficulties and the expense of the program. The team had played for 29 years (1986 through 2014).

  • c.1986(?) - 1988: helmets were gray with a logo consisting of a navy blue oval shape containing a white "M" and the team name "Oaks"
  • 1989 - 1990 and 1992 - 1995: plain gray helmet with blue stripe and blue facemask
  • 1991: "Menlo written on the left side in block letters like the Old San Diego State Aztec helmet that arched with the shape of the helmet"
  • 1996: switch made to white helmets initially plans were made to use a large, navy blue block "M" logo, "but before the first game they decided to take it off".

? - 2007 2008 - 2011 2012
*see note 1 below
2013 (last 7 games) 2013 - 2019
*see note 2 below

The University of Minnesota Crookston announced the discontinuation of its football team on December 10, 2019. The team had existed since either 1993 or 1994 prior to then. the school was a junior college which had a football team since at least 1972. During recent yearst he team had been a member of the NCAA Division II Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. "Golden Eagles" was the team nickname.

*1 During the 2012 season the logo was worn on the left side of the helmet only, with the right side being "blank".

*2 Helmet stripes were apparently first worn October 5, 2013 (vs Bemidji State) and apparently remained in use for the remainder of the season. The stripes were absent for Crookston's first four games of 2013.

Morris Brown College, an historically Black college in Atlanta, GA, announced the suspension of all its intercollegiate athletic teams in May 2003 the school was in the midst of a financial crisis and had lost its accreditation earlier in the year. The football team had recently moved to NCAA Division I-AA where it competed as an independent. The helmet design shown above was used by the team during at least its last couple of years.

Morthland College (West Frankfort, IL) had a varsity football team for one year only (2016) prior to the school's May 17, 2017 announcement that it would be discontinuing all intercollegiate athletic teams. The 2016 team was a member of neither the NCAA nor the NAIA, but did play an eight-game schedule featuring three NCAA or NAIA opponents (UW-Oshkosh, Lyon, and Maranatha Baptist Bible) the game listed on Morthland's schedule at Washington University-St. Louis was apparently played against that school's JV team. At least two helmet designs were used: a white helmet with green "M" during the first three games, and a white helmet with a 'patriot'/'M' logo beginning with game #4 (October 1 vs Maranatha Baptist Bible).

2000 - ? ? - 2013 2014 - 2015
2016 - 2017

Mount Ida College (Newton, MA) had a football team at the NCAA Division III level from 2000 through 2017. On April 6, 2018 the school announced that it would close at the end of the spring semester, with the college's facilities to be sold to the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The football team, nicknamed the "Mustangs", used only the four helmet designs shown above, to the best of my knowledge. The team had most recently been a member of the Eastern Collegiate Football Conference.

1987 - 1988 1989 - 1990 1991 - 1995
1996 - 1998 1999 - ? ? - 2001

Mount Senario College (Ladysmith, WI) announced the discontinuation of all its intercollegiate athletic programs on December 12, 2001 the "Fighting Saints" had competed in the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference prior to the announcement. The team's last helmet design is shown in the photograph below (the blue helmet) a copy of the logo used on this helmet would be greatly appreciated. The logo appears to simultaneously represent the letter "M" and a mountain, and it has been reported to me that there is a smaller "T" to the right of the "M", and a small "halo" above the "M".

  • 1987-1988: white helmets were used with a blue "M" logo "like the University of Minnesota"
  • 1989-1990: white helmets "with a SAINTS like the New York Giants"
  • 1991-1995: black helmets "with a silver Fighting Saints on it"
  • 1996-1998: navy blue helmets "with the same logo silver" (as previous)

Photographs of any of these would be greatly appreciated.

c.late 1960s c.1980s 1996 - 2006
2007 - 2010

UNO announced the discontinuation of its football team in March 2011. The team had competed at the NCAA Division II level and was a member of the Mid-American Intercollegiate Athletic Association during its last three seasons.

NEW JERSEY CITY UNIVERSITY

NJCU's football team used this design during the last year or two of its existence the team was discontinued in March 2003 for financial reasons. NJCU had been a member of the New Jersey Athletic Conference prior to the program's termination.

UNO had a club-level team from 1965 until 1971, which used this helmet for at least part of that time.

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (NYIT)

NYIT had a football team from (I think) 1969 through 1983. I have never received any information about this team's helmet designs except one photograph showing the team wearing white helmets with a "T" logo on the sides in some unknown color. 'Bears' was the team nickname.

This design was used by Niagara's (NY) club level team around the year 1980.

The NEIU football team existed from 1976 through 1988. From at least 1977 through 1981 the team apparently used plain dark-colored helmets without any stripes or logos on the sides the helmet color was reported to me many years ago to be brown, but the school colors presently are blue and gold. No color photographs have yet been located for this team.

Northwood Institute (now Northwood University), located in Cedar Hill, Texas, had a football team from 1968 through 1971. The team was known as the Cavaliers in 1968, and as the Knights during subsequent years.

? - 2012 2013 2014 - 2015
2016 - 2017 2018 2019 -

Occidental College (Los Angeles, CA) announced the termination of its NCAA Division III football team on October 13, 2020. The college had previously canceled its 2020 season (as did most other NCAA Division III teams) in response to the global viral pandemic. A statement attributed to college president Harry Elam read, "We make this decision in the context of the major financial downturn the college has experienced due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and also as the result of many years’ ongoing study of the football program."

The team had existed since 1894 and was a long-time a member of the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. "Tigers" was the team nickname.

Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath Falls, OR) had a football team for several decades the team last played in 1992 at which time the school was a member of the NAIA. The second helmet design shown above was apparently the last one used by the team. The 'Tech' logo was used for many consecutive years and may have been used with other helmet color/facemask color combinations than the two above. The 1976 design is shown in the photograph below:

The logo appears to be a cartoon owl encircled by the lettering "OREGON TECH / HUSTLIN' OWLS". No color photographs of this design have yet been located.

In 2014 Paine College (Augusta, GA) had an intercollegiate football team for the first time since 1964, which used the helmet design shown above. At the end of the 2014 season the team was "suspended" for at least two years according to this article. The "Lions" played as members of the NCAA Division II Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in 2014.

Parsons College (Fairfield, IA) had a football team from 1893 through 1970 the school closed in June 1973. "Wildcats" was the team nickname.

Paul Quinn College (Dallas, TX) had an NAIA independent football team for a short time during the early 2000s - specifically 2000 (I think) through 2006. The team used plain gold helmets for several years, but I have received photographs from a game against Howard Payne in 2006 in which the team can be seen wearing plain purple helmets. The team apparently did not ever use a helmet logo.

The college also had a team several decades earlier, which played its last season in 1967.

The clearest photograph that I have received of any helmet design used by Plattsburgh State (Plattsburgh, NY) shows the helmet design above - note that the logo is substantially different from the one used at the same time by the NFL's Cardinals (who were based in Saint Louis at that time). Other photographs (see below) that I have received (including additional ones allegedly from the 1973 season) show a logo that very closely resembles the one used by the NFL team - I would appreciate clarification as to specifically when these different logos were in use.

The white helmet with cardinal head logo was reportedly a new design for the 1973 season. The team is reported to have used "various designs" prior to 1973, including "midnight blue with no logo" in 1972. The more NFL-looking logo was apparently used with at least one red stripe, and with red facemasks, during later years - again I would appreciate specific information as to when these changes were made. The team was discontinued in 1979.

Principia (Elsah, IL) announced the "suspension" of its football team in late January 2009. Interestingly, financial reasons were not blamed, but rather concerns about "the small size of the team, the amount of experience among team members, the level of competition on the current schedule, and our ability to prepare athletes and coaches to compete effectively" (source: quote attributed to college President Jonathan Palmer, appearing in "Football suspended" by Maija Baldauf and K.C. Gahlon, The Principia Pilot, February 6, 2009).

The team used plain gold helmets during its last several seasons, and I have never received any information about earlier helmet designs used by the team.

QUANTICO MARINE CORPS BASE

The Quantico Marine Corps Base (Quantico, VA) had a football team from 1921 through 1972 which played a diverse set of opponents including many teams which now play at the NCAA Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision level. Information about this team is surprisingly scarce and color photographs have been almost impossible to find. The helmet design shown above was apparently the last one used by the team and may have been used in 1972 only (the team's last year). An earlier design, used apparently through most of the 1960s, is visible in the photographs below. I have no definite information about the colors used on this design but the helmet shell color is almost certainly scarlet (red) with a gold or yellow stripe (scarlet and gold are the traditional colors of the Marine Corps). The logo is almost certainly the Marines' traditional Eagle, Globe, and Anchor logo in some unknown color(s) (probably white or gold). Any color photographs of this design would be greatly appreciated.

During at least the 1989 season the Ramapo (Mahwah, NJ) "Roadrunners" used the helmet design shown above. The team played at the NCAA Division III level until it was discontinued in 1993.

c.1980 c.1985 - 1993 1994
1995 - 2005 2006 2007 - 2013
'A' 'B' 'C'
2014 2016 2014 - 2015 - 2016
*see note 1 below

Saint Cloud State University (St. Cloud, Minnesota) announced on December 10, 2019 that its NCAA Division II football team would be discontinued. The team had existed since 1895 and had participated in the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference since 2008. "Huskies" was the team nickname.

  • 2017 - 2019: B (entire season)
  • 2016: B-C-B C-C-B B-A-A A-B
  • 2015: C-C-B B-C-C B-B-B C-B
  • 2014: B-A-A B-B-A A-A-B B-B

*1 Uniform numerals are worn on the left side only of this design on the right side is the same "C"/"ST" logo worn on both sides of the 2007 - 2013 design.

? - 2001 2002 - 2003 2004 only?
2005 - 2009 2010 2011 - 2012
2013 - 2016

On February 3, 2017 Saint Joseph's College (Rensselaer, IN) announced that it was suspending all operations at the end of the 2016-2017 academic year. A large debt and other financial issues were cited and it is unclear whether the school will ever re-open.

The SJC football team had existed for many decades but I never received any information about its helmet designs from before the year 2001. The team was nicknamed the "Pumas" and competed in the NCAA Division II Great Lakes Valley Conference in 2016.

The above helmet design was used during the late 1960s and 1970s by Saint Mary of the Plains College (Dodge City, KS), an NAIA team which participated in the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference. The school closed in 1992. A later helmet logo was described as a "stylized 'St Marys' in script" this was used during the late 1980s through the team's final season. 'Cavaliers' was the team nickname.

c.late 1970s -
early 1980s
? - 1999 2000 - 2002
*see note 1 below
2003 - 2004

*1 This design was in use by at least 1986.

St. John's (Jamaica, NY) announced the discontinuation of its football team on December 16, 2002 the team participated in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference during its last year.

2003 - 2004 2005 - 2010
*see note 1 below

Saint Paul's (Lawrenceville, VA) discontinued its entire athletic program in May 2011. The school's intercollegiate football team had existed for six years and had been a member of the NCAA Division II Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association.

*1 This helmet was used by Saint Paul's club-level team in 2003 and 2004 (it was incorrectly reported to me that the varsity team which began play in 2005 would also be using this design). In the one decent photograph that I have seen of this helmet, the placement of the "tiger stripes" varied considerably from one helmet to the next apparently no specific pattern was designated for their use.

c.late 1970s ? - 1998 2003 - 2004
1999 - 2002 2005 - 2006

St. Peter's (Jersey City, NJ) had an intercollegiate football team from 1971 through 2006.

c.mid 1980s c.late 1980s c.late 1980s
c.late 1980s

The last Salem College (Salem, WV) football team played in 1988, at which time the team participated in the NAIA's West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. The team was known as the "Tigers".

The above design was apparently used from 1970 through 1972 (the team's last season) by the San Francisco "Dons". The team had used dark-colored helmets (probably green) during the late 1960s.

The second design shown above was used by at least the last two San Francisco State teams in 1993 and 1994. In about 1985 the team apparently used purple helmets with a gold football-shaped logo on the sides containing the team nickname "GATORS". The team played at the NCAA Division II level during its last few years.

Two earlier helmet designs are visible in the photographs below.

1960 - 1964 1965 - 1968 1969 - 1970
1971 - 1972? ? - 1982 1983 - 1993

1993 was Santa Clara's last season of football.

? - 1977 1978 1980
1979 1981
*see note 1 below

*1 In 1979 this design had a logo like that shown on the 1980 helmet on its right side only the left side was "blank".

The intercollegiate football program at Siena (Loudonville, NY) was terminated January 21, 2004. Siena had been a member of the NCAA Division I-AA Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference from 1993 through 2003, and a member of NCAA Division III from 1988 through 1992.

In 2001 Siena used helmets of a darker shade of green than were used the next two years. These featured a yellow block "S" logo which was quite similar to the one used by Stanford, and black facemasks. I would appreciate some photographs of the 2001 helmet, and a copy of the helmet logo for that year, so that I may add this one to the web site. Information about earlier helmets would also be appreciated.

This college, which was located in Huron, South Dakota, closed on April 1, 2005. Its football team had been a member of the NAIA Dakota Athletic Conference during its last few years.

During its final season in 2004 the team used a helmet logo which can be seen rather poorly in the photograph below. The logo featured the word "SITANKA" between the upraised wings of an eagle.

This design was used by the team at Sonoma State University (Sonoma, CA) during at least a few seasons in the early 1990s. This was apparently not the last design used by the team, however I have seen some photographs from the late 1990s showing the team using black helmets with a logo consisting of the word "Sonoma" across a pair of crossed swords.

Below is a photograph showing a football helmet which I believe, based on a process of elimination, to be one used by the University of South Dakota at Springfield in 1982. The photograph is part of a larger one appearing on page 133 of Morningside College's 1983 yearbook the logo appears to be the letters "SDS" arranged vertically within a larger "U". If identified accurately, this is the only photograph I have found showing a helmet design used by this team, which last played in either 1983 or 1984.(Update: unfortunately, this may instead be a Saint Cloud State helmet design.) "Pointers" was the team nicknamed and the helmet color is probably red.

2004 (at least one game) 2009 - 2010 2001 - 2008 (most games)
2011 - 2013
2014 (first game) 2014 2015
*see note 1 below

Stillman College, an historically Black college in Tuscaloosa, AL, announced that its intercollegiate football team would be dropped on December 3, 2015, citing financial difficulties. The "Tigers" had participated in the NCAA Division II Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.

The modern era of football at Stillman began in 1999 I would appreciate any helmet information for the 1999 and 2000 seasons. Before 1999 the college had last had a football team in 1950.

*1 "Plain" helmets were worn during at least one game in 2014 (game #1 vs West Alabama, September 6). Numerals were present on Stillman's helmets the following week (at Samford, September 13).

Sue Bennett College (London, KY) had an NAIA football team for a brief period during the 1990s (apparently 1991 through 1996) before the school closed in 1997. The only photograph I have ever received for this team is the one below (year unknown), which appears to show the team using dark green helmets with a white "SBC" logo, the letters arranged diagonally. The team nickname was "Dragons" and the school colors were green and white.

Swarthmore College (PA) announced the discontinuation of its football program on December 2, 2000. The Garnet had gone 4-5 during the 2000 season and had been a member of the NCAA Division III Centennial Conference. The helmet shown here was used during at least the last year or two of the program's existence. The previous helmet was maroon with a white block "S" logo, white facemask, and one white stripe.

The last Tarkio College (Tarkio, MO) football team played in 1990 as a member of the NAIA Heart of America Athletic Conference the college closed its doors shortly thereafter. The team was known as the "Owls". The helmet design shown above was used by the team at some unknown point in its history - probably during the 1970s or 1980s, based on its appearance in the photographs that I received.

The 1971 helmet has been described as "all white with a large deep purple T - the underside of the T was curved up to meet the center line".

1985 1986 1987
1988 1989 - ? ? - 1993

The name of Tennessee Wesleyan University (Athens, TN) did not appear on the long list of defunct college teams upon which I based the list at the top of this page, but I repeatedly came across its name while researching other schools in the region. TWU apparently had an NAIA football team from 1984 or 1985 through 1993. The university's yearbooks have been digitized allowing partial information to be gathered regarding the team's sequence of helmet designs there were apparently at least two others besides those represented above. 'Bulldogs' was the team nickname. Any additional information would be appreciated.

TRINITY BIBLE COLLEGE

? - 2001 2002 - 2003 2004 - 2006
2007 - 2008 2009 - 2011 2012 - 2019
*see note 1 below

Trinity Bible College (Ellendale, ND) terminated its football team on October 30, 2019, citing as the reason the safety of the small number of players remaining on the team's roster. The team was a member of the National Christian College Athletic Association but had often played NAIA and NCAA Division III teams.

From 2009 through 2011 TBC used blue helmets with a logo consisting of the team name "LIONS" and a lion head. I would appreciate a copy of the left-side helmet logo for this design below is a photograph from 2009:

TBC played its first season of football in 1984 - any information about earlier helmet designs used by the team would be greatly appreciated. I never received much information for this team so it is possible that other designs were missed, even during the more recent years.

*1 Apparently during most games in 2014 and 2015 TBC wore a large "lion head" logo on the right side only of each helmet (as represented below) this local was absent during at least the September 5, 2015 game at Presentation.

U.S. International University (San Diego, CA) had an intercollegiate football team which played its last season in 1979. The school was known as California Western University prior to 1968, and in 2001 it merged with another school to form what is now Alliant International University.

During the Cal Western years the team apparently used blue helmets, sometimes with a light-colored stripe and sometimes with light-colored numerals on the sides. I would appreciate any color photos from the years prior to 1969 and from the period 1972 through late 1970s.

? - 2001? 2002 2003 - 2005
2006 2007 - 2012 2013 - 2014
2015 - 2019

Urbana University (Urbana, OH) announced on April 21, 2020 that its campus would close at the end of the Spring 2020 semester. The school's football team had most recently been a member of the NCAA Division II Mountain East Conference.

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY TECH

? - 1998? 1999? - 2000? 2001 - 2002
2003 2004 2005
2006 - 2011

The discontinuation of the WVU Tech football team was announced on November 14, 2011, with "the high cost of operating [the] program, coupled with low fan attendance and support" cited as reasons for the decision. The team had most recently competed in the NAIA Mid-South Conference.

This team used several different helmet designs during the early 2000s which I have been unable to add to the web site I would greatly appreciate the necessary information for the helmets listed below before this information becomes lost in the shadows of time.

During at least the 2001 and 2002 seasons, West Virginia University Tech used a helmet logo that was only slightly different from the one the team used previously (c.1999 - 2000) below is a photograph. I would appreciate a copy of this logo so that I may add this historical helmet to the web site.

The team had another new helmet design for 2004. The helmets were dark blue (or maybe black?) and had a logo consisting of the word "TECH" in large white letters, with the words "WEST VIRGINIA" in smaller letters inside the horizontal bar of the "T" in "TECH". There were no stripes on the helmet. Again I will need a copy of the helmet logo in order to add this one to the site. Below is a photograph of one of the 2004 WVU Tech helmets:

In 2005, WVU Tech was using another new helmet design, shown in the photograph below. The helmets were some dark color (one person reported that they are black, though the school colors are blue and gold), and had a logo on the sides spelling the team name "BEARS", with a "paw" in place of the letter "B". I will need a copy of the 2005 helmet logo and confirmation of the helmet shell color in order to add this one to the web site.

An earlier helmet design used by the team (c.early 1980s) has been described as having a white shell, dark blue facemask, one dark blue stripe, and a logo consisting of the word "TECH" in gold letters with blue outlines.

? - 1999 2000 - 2005 2006 - 2008

Citing financial reasons, the difficulty of scheduling games against regional opponents, and the need to preserve other intercollegiate sports, WWU announced the termination of its 105-year-old football team on January 9, 2009. The team had competed at the NCAA Division II level for many years.

Partial information has been received about two earlier helmet designs: during the mid-1970s the team was using dark blue helmets with the same logo as is used by the NFL's Minnesota Vikings at another unspecified time, the team used silver helmets with a blue version of that same logo.

Westmar University (Le Mars, IA) closed in November 1997. The school had a football team for several decades, up to and including the 1997 season. Despite its fairly recent existence I have been able to find almost no information about helmet desigsn for this team, other than a few poor-quality photographs which appear to show the team using silver helmets with a blue "W" logo during the team's last few years. At this time the team competed in the NAIA South Dakota-Iowa Intercollegiate Conference. "Eagles" was the tean mickname.

The school was previously named Teikyo-Westmar University (from 1990 to 1994) and Westmar College (from 1948 to 1990).

Westminster College (Salt Lake City, UT) had an intercollegiate football team until 1979. I have never found or received any information about helmet designs used by this team other than the photographs below, which apparently show helmet designs used by Westminster during the early 1970s. The school colors are presently purple and copper, but could have been something else fifty years ago. The team nickname at that time was "Parsons".

Whitman College's (Walla Walla, WA) football team last played in 1976. The team nickname was "Missionaries" and I think several other helmet designs may have been used in addition to the one above, which was in use during the very early 1970s.

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE

1957? - 1962? 1963? - 1964 1965 - ?
*see note 1 below *see note 2 below
1970? - 1971? ? - 1972 1973 - 1974
*see note 3 below

The University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee had an intercollegiate football team through 1974. The team was known as the "Cardinals" through 1964, but a change to "Panthers" (and to new school colors) was made the following year. Due to scarce information the dates of use for several of these designs are uncertain.

*1 This design was used from 1957 through 1962, and possibly in 1956 and/or 1963 also.

*2 This design was used from 1965 through 1969, and possibly in 1970 also.

*3 This design was used in 1972, and possibly in 1971 also.

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-SUPERIOR

The football team of the University of Wisconsin at Superior played two games in 1992 before the program was abruptly terminated. The team, nickanmed "Yellow Jackets", had competed in the NCAA Division III Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.

The team apparently switched between white, gold, and orange helmets prior to about 1980 but may have always used black helmets during its last decade or so. The 1992 team used black helmets with the script word "Jackets" on the side in white or gold/yellow this logo was in use by at least 1984. Additional information would be appreciated.

Yankton College (Yankton, SD)is another small defunct school for which I been able to find almost no information other than a single photograph from an unknown year showing the football team using yellow helmets with an unrecognizable logo (below). The team played nine games in 1984 and the college closed in December of that year. "Greyhounds" was the nickname of the team. which competed as a member of the NAIA.

Discontinued Junior College Teams

? - 2012 2013 2014
*see note 1 below
2015 - 2017 2018 -
*see note 2 below *see note 3 below

Arizona Western College (Yuma, AZ) is one of the seven junior colleges in Arizona which terminated their intercollegiate football teams following the 2018 season.

*1 This design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side has a large "W" logo (as depicted below).

*2 This design has uniform numerals on its left side only the right side has a large "W" logo (as depicted below).

*3 This design has the "W" logo on its left side only the right side has uniform numerals (as on the left side of the 2015-2017 design).

Cayuga Community College (Auburn, NY) had a football team for just four years (1996 through 1999) which used the helmet design shown above during at least 1997 and 1998. "Spartans" was the team nickname.

Cowley Community College (Arkansas City, KS) had a football team through the 1983 season the team was called the "Tigers" and participated in the Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference. The above are apparently the last two helmet designs used by the team.

DAKOTA COLLEGE AT BOTTINEAU

Dakota College discontinued its football team following the 2019 season the team had first played in 2008 (the college also had a team in 1958 and earlier years).

? - 2014 2015 - 2016 2017 - 2018
*see note 1 below

Glendale Commmunity College (Glendale, AZ) discontinued its football program following the 2018 season the team had first played in 1967 and was nicknamed the "Gauchos".

*1 This design has uniform numerals on its left side and a "gaucho" logo on its right side (as represented below).

GLOBE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Globe Tech apparently discontinued its football team in mid-2016. I received very little information about this team while it was in existence and there may have been several other helmet designs used by the team during its last few years. The last design shown above was apparently in used during Globe's last game (vs Ellsworth C.C. in the Graphic Edge Bowl, December 6, 2015 at Cedar Falls, IA) and during at least one other game in 2015.

Grand Rapids C.C. announced the termination of its football team on January 9, 2012, citing several reasons including scheduling difficulties, budget concerns, "compliance problems with federal Title IX regulations", and "the sudden departure of [head football] Coach [Tony] Annese". The team had been a member of the NJCAA Midwest Football Conference and had compiled a 21-2 record during its last two seasons.

In 2010 and 2011 GRCC used dark blue helmets with yellow facemasks and with a logo representing the letters "GR", which were yellow with white outlines. I would appreciate a copy of this logo, which you may see in the photograph below:

The discontinuation of the Harper College (Palatine, IL) football team was announced on January 16, 2012, with "budget issues and scheduling difficulties" cited as reasons. The announcement also made reference to the recent disbanding of the football teams at Midwest Football Conference rival schools Grand Rapids Community College and Joliet Junior College.

The Harper team was nicknamed the "Hawks" and used the design shown above during at least its last three years.

Joliet Junior College (Joliet, IL) announced the elimination of its football team on November 9, 2011, citing "the high costs associated with operating the program and [the] need to balance gender equity among sports offered at the college due to Title IX requirements." The team had competed as a member of the Midwest Football Conference and the last two helmet designs used by the team are shown above.

The Lon Morris (Jacksonville, TX) "Bearcats" played for only two seasons (2010 and 2011). The college eliminated all of its intercollegiate sports teams in June 2012 as the school dealt with financial problems.

The College of Marin (Kentfield, CA) football team was discontinued following the 2008 season. The team was known as the "Mariners".

? - 2010 2011 - 2014? 2015 - 2016

Mendocino College (Ukiah, CA) announced the termination of its football team on February 7, 2017. Information about this team scarce during its last several seasons and it is possible that other helmet designs were used besides those shown above. "Eagles" was the team nickname.

? - 2009 2011 (early season) 2011
2010 2012 - 2013 2014? - 2015
2016 - 2018

I do not yet know the dates of existence for this team, but it apparently played during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, at least. The team nickname was "Lions" and the school is located in Bloomington, MN.

? - 2011 2012 2013
2015 - 2018 2019 -

Northland CTC discontinued its football team after the 2019 season the school did not field a team in 2014.

In 2013 Northland's helmet design featured the team name "Pioneers" and the head and shoulders of a pioneer figure (photo below) I would greatly appreciate a copy of this helmet logo.

This team, known as the "Trojans", played its last season in 2008. The helmet design shown above was in use during at least the 2008 season.

2010 ? - 2009 2012 2011 2013 -

2001 - 2004 2006 2005 2007
2008 2009 - 2011 2012 - 2014
2015 - 2016 2017 - 2018

Pima Community College (Tuscon, AZ) ended its intercollegiate football team after the 2018 season. The team had been nicknamed the "Aztecs".

Ricks College (Rexburg, ID) had a successful junior college team for many years until its absorption by the Brigham Young University system in 2001. The helmet design shown above was apparently in use for several years during the 1990s and may have been the last design used by the team. Silver helmets with several different logos were worn through 1991. The team was known as the "Vikings".

The Rock Valley College (Rockford, IL) team was cancelled on January 28, 2010, with academic deficiencies by the team cited as the reason. The team's last two known helmet designs are shown above. An earlier design (year of use unknown) appears in the photo below:

The governing board of Solano C.C. (Fairfield, CA) announced the termination of the school's football team on March 7, 2012. The team was nicknamed the "Falcons" and used the helmet design shown above during its last few seasons. I believe that this design had also been used with one blue stripe and with a blue-white-blue set of stripes at various times.

Taft College (Taft, CA) had a football team through 1993 the team name was "Cougars". The helmet design shown above was used by the team during at least the early 1980s.

Walla Walla Community College (Walla Walla, WA) played its last season of football in approximately 1993 the above design was in use during at least the 1986 season.

*1 The left side of this design is "blank" but a logo adorns the right side (as represented below).

"As part of its college wide budget reduction plan, West Valley College has discontinued its football program effective January 27, 2014." (- statement published on the website of West Valley College (Saratoga, CA)). The team nickname was 'Vikings' and 2013 was its last season.


News Highlights

Minnesota State Mankato one of three partners

Owatonna community celebrates new Minnesota State Mankato presence.

2009-02-19 Riverland Community College news release [2/18/2009]

Representatives from Minnesota State University, Mankato, Riverland Community College, South Central College, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the Owatonna community gathered at the Owatonna College and University Center (OCUC) yesterday to celebrate the historic collaboration between Owatonna and Minnesota higher education.

Honored guests Ruth Grendahl, vice chair, Board of Trustees, and Chancellor James H. McCormick of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system joined Minnesota State University, Mankato President Dr. Richard Davenport, Riverland Community College President Dr. Terrence Leas and South Central College President Keith Stover. Community leader Tim McManimon and others instrumental in the development of the OCUC also joined the celebration as well as system administrators, legislators, college faculty, staff and community members.

In April 2008, Gov. Tim Pawlenty signed into a law a bonding bill that allowed the Minnesota State College and Universities system to acquire the Owatonna College and University Center (OCUC) for $3.5 million.

"The Owatonna center brings to life a primary direction for the system's Board of Trustees, which is to increase access to higher education and provide opportunities for the people of Minnesota to succeed," McCormick said.

"I want to acknowledge the community for their unwavering interest in this center and applaud Riverland Community College, South Central College and Minnesota State University, Mankato for stepping up to meet the higher education needs of this region. This is an impressive partnership, and I look forward to the center's continued success."

On Dec. 31, 2008, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities finalized the purchase of the OCUC securing nine acres on which the 25,000-square-foot building sits plus an additional 18 acres. This acquisition will allow better service and offerings, increased academic program options for students, and enhanced community and workforce partnerships.

"This milestone for our system and state would not have occurred without the support and active work of the system office, our board of trustees, the governor's staff, legislators and community leaders," said Leas. "Owning the OCUC offers financial savings for the system and the state."

Public higher education partners Riverland Community College, Minnesota State University, Mankato and South Central College will provide classes. The partnership reduces cost barriers to learners and offers lower division liberal arts, career and technical education, and upper division and graduate-level studies in one, accessible location.

A 2006 study conducted by MGT Consultants, completed at the request of the area communities and the system, supported acquisition of the facility. MGT identified Owatonna as the largest community in the state of Minnesota not currently served by a designated Minnesota State Colleges and Universities site.

"This acquisition will assure continued access in the Owatonna community and a region experiencing a need for skilled workers," said McManimon, president of Profinium Financial in Owatonna.

The Owatonna College and University Center is the newest campus center of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system, which comprises state universities and community and technical colleges serving the higher education needs of Minnesota. The partnership includes Riverland Community College, South Central College and Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Riverland Community College, a member of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system, is a regional comprehensive community college inspiring learning for living through a personalized educational environment. Approximately 4,000 students are served, annually, through a wide range of credit-based educational opportunities. An additional 5,600 students are annually served in non-credit courses. Facilities are located in Albert Lea, Austin, and Owatonna, Minn. Riverland may be found on the Internet at www.riverland.edu.

South Central College is a Minnesota Community and Technical College with a history of academic excellence since 1946. The college has campuses in Faribault and North Mankato. More than 5,000 students are served annually through credit-based education at South Central College and an additional 16,000 are served through South Central College?s Center for Business and Industry.

Minnesota State University, Mankato is a comprehensive applied doctoral university with more than 14,500 students, 150 programs of study, approximately 1,800 faculty and staff, and more than 100,000 alumni worldwide. The university offers classes online and at its beautifully landscaped, 300-acre residential campus in Mankato at its new 7700 France site in Edina and at the Owatonna College & University Center.

The Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system comprises 32 state universities and community and technical colleges serving the higher education needs of Minnesota. The system serves about 250,000 students per year in credit-based courses and an additional 140,000 students in non-credit courses.


History

Northwest Technical College history dates back to the early 1960s, when Bemidji High School teacher Jake Outwin recognized that the region needed a workforce with the practical skills and knowledge necessary for professional opportunities. With the support of the community and the state of Minnesota, he led an effort to establish the Bemidji Area Vocational Technical Institute, a two-year college that began with two programs, carpentry and automotive mechanics.

That was 1965. Over the the past 50 years, the college evolved through several new names and gained new programs in medical, business, child development and other technological fields that met the increasing needs of its learners, the state and the nation. To lead those programs, creative and resourceful professionals brought incredible talent to the college and tirelessly worked to fulfill its mission.

The profile of NTC learners changed with time. To predominately young, local male high school graduates were added more young women, as well as students of many ages and ethnicities. Changes in the college physical plant and new technology advanced learning and teaching success. NTC continues to demonstrate its commitment to developing imaginative leaders who effectively address the challenges of life in a technological society, a pluralistic nation and a multicultural world.

Northwest Technical College
905 Grant Avenue SE, Bemidji, MN 56601-4907

A member of the colleges and universities of Minnesota State, Northwest Technical College is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer.

Northwest Technical College has been accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.


19.10: Viruses

Viruses are visible only under an electron microscope. They come in a variety of shapes, ranging from spherical to rod shaped. The fact that they contain either deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA)&mdashbut never both&mdashallows them to be divided into two major classes: DNA viruses and RNA viruses (Figure (PageIndex<1>)).

Figure (PageIndex<1>): Viruses. Viruses come in a variety of shapes that are determined by their protein coats.

Most RNA viruses use their nucleic acids in much the same way as the DNA viruses, penetrating a host cell and inducing it to replicate the viral RNA and synthesize viral proteins. The new RNA strands and viral proteins are then assembled into new viruses. Some RNA viruses, however, called retroviruses (Figure (PageIndex<2>)), synthesize DNA in the host cell, in a process that is the reverse of the DNA-to-RNA transcription that normally occurs in cells. The synthesis of DNA from an RNA template is catalyzed by the enzyme reverse transcriptase.

Figure (PageIndex<2>): Life Cycle of a Retrovirus

In 1987, azidothymidine (AZT, also known as zidovudine or the brand name Retrovir) became the first drug approved for the treatment of AIDS. It works by binding to reverse transcriptase in place of deoxythymidine triphosphate, after which, because AZT does not have a 3&primeOH group, further replication is blocked. In the past 10 years, several other drugs have been approved that also act by inhibiting the viral reverse transcriptase.

Raltegravir (Isentress) is a newer anti-AIDS drug that was approved by the FDA in October 2007. This drug inhibits the integrase enzyme that is needed to integrate the HIV DNA into cellular DNA, an essential step in the production of more HIV particles.

A major problem in treating HIV infections is that the virus can become resistant to any of these drugs. One way to combat the problem has been to administer a &ldquococktail&rdquo of drugs, typically a combination of two reverse transcriptase inhibitors along with a protease inhibitor. These treatments can significantly reduce the amount of HIV in an infected person.

Career Focus: Genetics Counselor

A genetics counselor works with individuals and families who have birth defects or genetic disorders or a family history of a disease, such as cancer, with a genetic link. A genetics counselor may work in a variety of health-care settings (such as a hospital) to obtain family medical and reproductive histories explain how genetic conditions are inherited explain the causes, diagnosis, and care of these conditions interpret the results of genetic tests and aid the individual or family in making decisions regarding genetic diseases or conditions. A certified genetics counselor must obtain a master&rsquos degree from an accredited program. Applicants to these graduate programs usually have an undergraduate degree in biology, psychology, or genetics.

Photo courtesy of the United States National Institutes for Health, commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Geneticcounseling.jpg.


Leadership / Mission

On behalf of all of the faculty and staff of Vermilion Community College, we would like to welcome you to our website. Please take a few minutes to navigate around our site and explore all that Vermilion has to offer. Whether you are a current high school student, a recent graduate, or a non-traditional student returning to higher education to hone or obtain new skills, Vermilion may well be the educational adventure for you.

Our beautiful location, perched on the very edge of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, offers you a million acres of unspoiled natural laboratory in which to experience our many unique degree programs, and a one of a kind setting for the liberal arts student looking to complete the first two years of their college education. Whatever your educational aspirations, Vermilion has a friendly and committed faculty and staff waiting to help guide you down the road to obtain your goals.

Vermilion Community College is a residential, comprehensive, community college where students from all walks of life come to be part of our family of learners. Founded in 1922, Vermilion is now one of five colleges in the Northeast Higher Education District that shares a common college interim president, Dr. Michael Raich. Under Dr. Michael Raich leadership and with the support of our vibrant community of Ely, Vermilion stands as a shining example of the benefits a small college offers today’s student small classes, engaged instructors who know their students, knowledgeable staff, and a top notch education.

I hope our website can begin to answer some of you questions, but please don’t hesitate to contact us and let our expert staff help you begin the education of a lifetime.

Interim Provost Chris Koivisto

[email protected]

Quicklinks

Vermilion Community College located in beautiful Ely, Minnesota.

We pride ourselves on our strong academic programs, our athletic experiences that we offer, our many and diverse student clubs, and of course, our friendly and helpful staff and faculty.

Our campus serves a total of about 700 students – 600 on campus and the rest online or at other sites. Our student body is made up of about 68 % male and 32 % female, with most of our students attending full time. The majority of our students are from the Midwest, yet we have international students as well – this year from countries as far away as Australia and Japan.

VCC costs are affordable, and we provide a living experience right on campus. You may prefer to live in the residence hall and not have to go outside during the winter months, or you may prefer to have a brisk wake-up call as you walk to classes from your duplex or college apartment. Either way, we can meet your needs.

Our mission focuses on the natural world, and you’ll get a taste of that as a student in Ely. From Natural Resources or Outdoor Leadership Programs to the Liberal Arts, and from taxidermy to dog sledding classes, you can study in any of your desired fields while getting out in the field. Our hands-on approach to learning helps students get a real flavor of the natural world that surrounds us.

Vermilion Community College will be recognized as a vital two-year residential college that serves the changing needs of its communities by providing a high-quality comprehensive learning environment.

Vermilion Community College educates people from all walks of life to become well-rounded, ethical citizens prepared to work, live, and learn in a changing world, especially the natural world that surrounds us.


Hormel Foods partners with Riverland Community College to launch Maintenance Trainee Program

With the lack of qualified candidates in the applicant pool over the last several years, Hormel Foods realized it was time to try something different. The company developed a new program where they offered an opportunity for their current production employees who showed initiative, mechanical aptitude and the desire to try a career in the maintenance field.

The company had over 25 employees show interest in the program five of whom were selected &mdash two for the mechanical program and three for the electrical program. With this new trainee program, the company pays the employees for their time in class as well as their time doing on the job training (OJT).

&ldquoThe goal of the program is that by the time the trainees finish their two years of schooling at Riverland Community College, they will also have finished learning a variety of on the job skills and will be ready to perform in a qualified mechanical or electrical position at the plant,&rdquo said Judy Callahan, human resources manager, Austin Plant. &ldquoThis is an excellent program where Hormel Foods is able to grow its own talent.&rdquo

In addition, Hormel Foods and Riverland Community College also partnered together to apply for funding from The Minnesota PIPELINE Project Dual Training Program. The Minnesota PIPELINE (Private Investment, Public Education, Labor and INdustry Experience) Project is an innovative approach to address current and future workforce needs. It serves as a catalyst for developing industry-based, employer-driven, dual-training programs throughout the state.

By leveraging Minnesota&rsquos success with registered apprenticeship and focusing on the targeted industries, the PIPELINE Project is assisting employers to change the question from &ldquoHow do we get workers with the skills we need?&rdquo to &ldquoHow do we give workers the skills we need?&rdquo Dual training, like apprenticeship, is an earn-as-you-learn approach where the employer invests in its employee by building a training infrastructure, developing career pathways and investing in the employee&rsquos education.

Hormel Foods employees participating in the program have shared their input on their experience.

&ldquoThe maintenance trainee program has benefited me tremendously because I&rsquom able to pursue a career that I&rsquom passionate about while still having time for my family,&rdquo said Mike Graber, current maintenance trainee.

Monroe Warren, another maintenance trainee shared, &ldquoWorking for Hormel Foods is a great opportunity, but being able to grow talent in a job I love is one of the best things that has happened to me. I am able to work side by side with people with so much knowledge who are teaching me so much. If not for this program, I could have never been able to do such great things. I want to say thank you to all the great people who helped me to be able to do this with my life.&rdquo


Watch the video: Music Program at Riverland Community College